/
Close
Newsletters  | Mobile

RSS Feed Travel News

What the Global Travel Alert Means for You

201308-hd-travel-warning-illojpg

The global travel alert that the U.S. Department of State issued at the end of last week has been met with a fair amount of criticism and head scratching. It’s vague. It’s frightening. And it’s not very clear what a traveler should do with this information.

The alert, which is valid through August 31, warns U.S. citizens about “the continued potential for terrorism attacks, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa.” It was prompted, according to news reports, by intercepted communications between al Qaeda operatives—chatter that Senator Saxby Chambliss, ranking member of the Senate Intelligence Committee characterized on NBC’s “Meet the Press” as “very reminiscent of what we saw pre-9/11.” Though Yemen is obviously a major area of concern right now (the U.S. has not only evacuated the embassy there, but urged all Americans to leave the country), the State Department’s alert is not restricted to any particular region. It even goes so far as to remind travelers of the possibility of attacks on “public transportation systems and other tourist infrastructure,” including subway, rail, and aviation services. (A threat that is underscored by a recent ABC News story about terrorists working to develop an as-yet-undetectable explosive liquid.)

Read More

100 Ways to Travel Better: We Want YOU!

201308-hd-travel-illojpg

Travel + Leisure is joining forces with CNN for 100 Ways to Travel Better, the definitive go-to resource for our best expert travel tips—and yours.
 
We want to know your tips and tricks for making the most of your trip—avoiding hidden fees, getting free upgrades, beating the crowds, and enjoying travel without all the stress.
 
You can share your tips from the road by going to CNN’s iReport page. There, we’re asking smart travelers to submit their best advice, along with a vacation photo.

Read More

Huge Fire Shuts Down Kenya’s Main Airport

201308-hd-nairobi-airportjpg

Travel to East Africa came to a halt this morning as fire raged for several hours at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, suspending international arrivals traffic on Wednesday. Most international flights were diverted to the coastal city of Mombasa.

Flames and a massive cloud of dark smoke could be seen from the center of Kenya’s capital city, as part of the airport—the region’s largest—became a blackened shell. Emergency vehicles were immediately dispatched only to be caught in rush hour traffic on the main road to the airport. Fire trucks were faced with low water supplies at the site of the blaze.

Read More

Do Lonely Planet Layoffs Signal the Death of Guidebooks?

201308-b-lonely-planet-guidebooksjpg

Maybe Jeff Bezos wants to buy Lonely Planet, too? This spring, BCC Worldwide sold the Melbourne-based guidebook company to a Tennessee media company for a reported loss of $130 million. Now comes news that Lonely Planet is planning to lay off some 70 to 80 employees at its Australian headquarters, a development that has sparked eulogies across the digital sphere (perhaps ironic, given the Internet’s role in guidebooks’ demise). The publisher has had to deny rumors that its printed guides are on their way out.

This is only the latest twist in what has been a decidedly rollercoaster couple of years for guidebooks. After Google bought, for $23 million, the stalwart Frommer’s brand of travel guides and then bled the books for content (see the new and improved Google Maps), it sold the brand back to Arthur Frommer himself in April. The 83-year-old recently announced that he would begin publishing guides again in October, introducing a short EasyGuides series aimed at attention-deprived audiences. As reported in the New York Times, he hopes to have roughly 80 titles published by the end of 2014. To call this plan ambitious is an understatement.

Read More

The Doctor Recommends: Must-Reads for the Week Ending August 2, 2013

201304-b-trip-doctor-readingjpg

According to Yahoo!, Borders bookstores, which went bankrupt in the U.S. in 2011, are now re-opening in Singapore. [Maria Pedone]

Two world records were broken at the annual Lorraine Mondial Air Balloons festival in eastern France, with over 400 balloons hitting the skies, via AP. [M.P.]

No knock-knock jokes for this Nantucket bar: a five-foot long shark was found in front of the door at Sea Dog Brew Pub, via Huffington Post. [M.P.]

In an attempt to contain rowdy foreigners, the Greek island of Crete is considering setting up designated tourist zones to keep its citizens safe, according to CNN. [Jennifer Flowers]

Read More

New Cruise Safety Disclosures

201301-b-carnival-cruise-line-cheers-programjpg

Starting today, Royal Caribbean International, Carnival, and Norwegian Cruise Lines—which represent nearly 90 percent of the cruise business in North America—will begin posting allegations of ship-board crimes on their websites, all in an effort to address concerns related to the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act (CVSSA). T+L reached out to Cruise Lines International Association for comment. Their take?

Cruising is one of the safest, most enjoyable vacation experiences for millions of people every year, and the crime rate on cruise ships is a small fraction of corresponding rates on land.

Read More

Trip Doctor: Norovirus on a Plane—What You Need to Know

201302-b-sick-flyingjpg

This morning’s news of a possible norovirus outbreak on a Qantas flight from Santiago, Chile to Sydney, Australia, has us all on edge. Known for wreaking havoc on cruise ships, the norovirus is not a typical worry for fliers. Should it be?

Read More

Trip Doctor: TSA’s Not-So-Great Report Card

201303-hd-expedited-securityjpg

Here’s some news that will make you squirm in your airplane seat: complaints filed against airport security workers have increased by 26 percent over the last three years, according to a new study the Transportation Security Agency released yesterday by the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

About half the cases—9,622 in all since 2010—had to do with attendance and leave (32 percent) and screening and security (20 percent). Shockingly, those screening and security offenses included allowing travelers or baggage to bypass screening, sleeping on the job, drug and alcohol use while on duty, mishandling of classified information, and inappropriate or sexual misconduct. The report also cited a case in 2011 where a transportation security officer at Orlando International Airport pled guilty of embezzlement and theft charges for stealing more than $80,000 worth of laptops and other electronics.

Read More

Tech Thursday: Hipmunk Gets a Last-Minute Upgrade

201308-hd-hipmunkjpg

We’ve long loved Hipmunk for its brilliant intelligent search capabilities, which help you find the least agonizing flights or the hotels that are best suited to your individual needs. Today, the app launches an update that once again changes the game: this time, it takes on the last-minute hotel booking sphere that has become quite the competitive space as of late.

Read More

El Celler de Can Roca’s New Gelato Shop

Rocambolesc Gelateria

The food world is buzzing about brothers Joan, Jordi, and Josep Roca, whose restaurant El Celler de Can Roca, in the Catalonian river town of Girona, was recently crowned No. 1 on the planet. But we’re sweet on their other spot nearby: Rocambolesc Gelateria. The pint-size ice cream shop, decorated with vintage machinery and pipes that look like candy canes, dispenses a rotating roster of soft-serve flavors (baked apple; tangerine sorbet) topped with such novelties as caramelized sheep’s milk and lychee-strawberry “cloud”—and not a sprinkle in sight.

Photo by Alvaro Leiva

Advertisement

Sign Up


Connect With Travel + Leisure
  • Travel+Leisure
  • Tablet
  • Available devices

Already a subscriber?
Get FREE ACCESS to the digital edition


Advertisement


Advertisement

Advertisement

Marketplace