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Montenegro’s Guitar Hero Makes His Carnegie Hall Debut

Milos Karadaglic

No doubt Montenegro’s 28-year-old Miloš Karadaglić could get by on his dreamboat looks alone. They’re matched by a virtuoso guitar technique and deep musicality that make Miloš, as he’s known professionally, one of the most galvanizing classical instrumentalists to emerge in recent years. Born in Montenegro—“The most beautiful country in the world,” he says, with some justification—Miloš was eight when he picked up his father’s battered old guitar. By age 16, he was accomplished enough to win a scholarship to London’s Royal Academy of Music. Today, Miloš seems poised for a major international career. Deutsche Grammophon recently released his first recording, Mediterráneo; following club appearances at New York’s Living Room and at (Le) Poisson Rouge, and he made his Carnegie Hall debut this past weekend in the intimate Weill Recital Hall. Look for more dates in the future. We will be following this rising star.

Photo by Olaf Heine

Salzburg’s Hills are Alive with the Sound of Music (Finally!)

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After shunning the play for its portrayal of Austria's great support of the Third Reich during WWII, Salzburg is finally shelving its past. On October 23, the Salzburger Landestheater will debut The Sound of Music, the beloved Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical-turned-blockbuster film, for the first time in the city's history. Dutch actress Wietske van Tongeren leads in the role of Maria while German music star Uwe Kröger woos as Captain von Trapp.

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OKA! Opens: New Film Highlights Rarely Heard Music From Africa

In theaters today, OKA! is an adaptation of the memoir of an ethnomusicologist from New Jersey, Louis Sarno, who moved to the remote forests of the Central African Republic to record the music of the Bayaka Pygmies over 20 years ago, fell in love and stayed.

Kris Marshall (Love Actually) gives a fine performance as the ethnomusicologist, but it’s the local Bayaka ensemble cast and the lush African rainforest that are worth your attention here. The plot is familiar—a capitalistic politician wants to destroy the Bayaka’s forest home to make way for a logging company’s expansion—but don’t be quick to dismiss this as another Fern Gully rip-off. The beauty of this film is in the moments that aren’t trying to move the plot along—children singing in perfect syncopated rhythm together, a group of women making music in a river using the water as their only instrument, and the documentary-worthy wildlife shots.

If you're in New York you can catch it at the Angelika Film Center, and soon in other theaters nationwide.

Lyndsey Matthews is an online editorial assistant at Travel + Leisure

From Boston to Moscow, Cities for the Arts-Obsessed to Visit

Harpa in Reykjavik, Iceland

Boston: After opening the Art of the Americas wing by Foster & Partners, the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, continues its renovation with seven galleries devoted to contemporary art in the Linde Family Wing. First show: wood sculptures by Ellsworth Kelly on September 18. 465 Huntington Ave..

Montreal: Music director Kent Nagano leads the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony to inaugurate the concert hall (Sept. 7), designed by Toronto architects Diamond & Schmitt. Rufus Wainwright joins the orchestra in a program featuring his own songs (Oct. 5). 1600 Rue St.-Urbain.

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L.A.'s First-Annual Food & Wine Festival

Food and wine festivals are becoming a ubiquitous fixture in every self-respecting dining destination, but until recently, the City of Angels had little to call its own.

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Enter the first-annual Los Angeles Food & Wine (LAFW), presented by American Express Publishing (T+L's parent company): a four-day (October 13-16) festival that features more than 50 culinary events across four neighborhoods. From a California clambake in Santa Monica with chef Tom Colicchio, to a red carpet VIP event and pork and pinot noir party hosted by chef Todd English, to a musical performance by Train, the festival promises to levy L.A.’s megawatt star power while showcasing its considerable dining chops. We got the scoop from LAFW’s co-founder, David Bernahl.

Q: How did the LAFW come about?
A: There are all these rock star younger chefs that are really leading the culinary world right now, and we knew from experience that this is the best way to get people interested in food and wine. We set out two years ago to start creating something that was deserving of the city.

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What's on Stage: The Season's Best Operas

soprano Anna Netrebko as Anna Bolena

London: Fiona Shaw, the British stage and film actress (Petunia Dursley in the Harry Potter films), returns to the English National Opera to stage The Marriage of Figaro, Mozart’s classic bittersweet comedy (Oct. 5–Nov. 10).

Zurich: José Saramago’s novel Blindness was made into a film in 2008 starring Julianne Moore. Now German composer Anno Schreier, 32, has set it to music as Die Stadt der Blinden for the Zurich Opera (Nov. 12–Dec. 4).

San Francisco: Composer Christopher Theofanidis’s powerful work, Heart of a Soldier, commemorating the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks, is based on the life of Rick Rescorla, who helped guide thousands of people out of Tower 2 before it collapsed. Baritone Thomas Hampson plays Rescorla. (Sept. 10–30).

Minneapolis: The Minnesota Opera presents the world premiere of Silent Night, by the composer Kevin Puts, based on the film Joyeux Noël, about a Christmas Eve truce between soldiers in World War I (Nov. 12–20).

New York City: The multimedia project Portals features the violinist Tim Fain and video and choreography by Benjamin Millepied in Philip Glass’s seven-movement Partita for Solo Violin at Symphony Space (Sept. 24).

On September 26, the Metropolitan Opera opens its season with Donizetti’s rarely produced Anna Bolena, with soprano Anna Netrebko (pictured) as the ill-fated second wife of Henry VIII (through Oct. 28; also Feb. 1–4). Later, the company presents The Enchanted Island, a Baroque pastiche with music by Handel, Vivaldi, and Rameau and starring David Daniels and Joyce DiDonato (opens Dec. 31).

Photo by Brigitte Lacombe/Courtesy of the Metropolitan Opera

Destination Radio: Emirates Airline Launches a (Cool) New App

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With the invention of the iPod and the digitalization of music, listening to the radio seems to be almost prehistoric. Whenever I start a sentence with the phrase, “I heard on the radio today…” my friends are at first confused, then immediately flabbergasted that I would partake in such a seemingly unhip activity (I guess it’s my nostalgic nature, or the fact that I’m too lazy to play DJ all the time).

But radio has been making a comeback, especially when Pandora Radio was launched in 2005, introducing the masses to the digital (i.e. cool) version of its dashboard predecessor. And now, with the iPhone spurring on the creation of a plethora of apps, radio is back.

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Montreal Musician Shows and Tells

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Over the years, I’ve found one of the best ways to know a city’s best-kept secrets is to talk to its artists. I recently connected with one of Montreal’s rising stars—award-winning filmmaker and musician Daniel Isaiah, who's signed, appropriately, with music label Secret City Records.

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Istanbul's Jazz Festival Brings in Top Talent

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When one thinks of Istanbul, what comes to mind? Perhaps some beautiful mosques silhouetted against the sky, exotic bazaars filled with spices and silks, maybe even the strains of the adhan (or the Islamic call to prayer). But what about jazz?

The Turks are crazy about it. One of the biggest cultural events of the year, the 18th annual Jazz Festival is taking over the city this month (until July 19), featuring acts like Herbie Hancock (who’s leading a quintet in tribute of jazz diety Miles Davis), Paul Simon, Joss Stone, and more. Not to be missed is Angelique Kidjo, Dianne Reeves, and Lizz Wright’s collaboration called “Sing the Truth,” which will incorporate songs from legendary female jazz, folk, and R&B singers like Aretha Franklin, Odetta, and Lauryn Hill.

Click here for the complete lineup.

Kirsten Stamn is an ASME intern at Travel + Leisure.

Photo courtesy of the Istanbul Jazz Festival

John Turturro's New Film Is A Love Song to Naples

It's not often a film evokes the spirit of a city the way John Turturro's Passione captures the musical exuberance that pulses through Naples, Italy. We're not talking opera, but a blend of genres that reflects the cultures of the city's invaders as well as its more recent immigrants. Greeks and Spaniards, Arabs and Americans, Turks and French—their songs and melodies have thrived, mixed, and married in a cultural petri dish warmed by the southern Italian sun. And that, in a nutshell, is the whole point of the movie.

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