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Bywater, New Orleans: The South's Next Great Neighborhood

Bywater New Orleans: Booty's

This area is growing by the minute, while still preserving its cultural authenticity. Chef Jonathan Lestingi’s New American gastropub, Oxalis (3162 Dauphine St.), serves up terrific whiskey cocktails and shareable plates. Order the Cajun-spiced hot buttered rum popcorn. Baskerville (3000 Royal St.; by appointment), a nonprofit center, offers letterpress printing workshops; the presses themselves are works of art. Tigermen Den (3113 Royal St.) is an ever-evolving event space that hosts everything from art exhibits to weekly Sunday brunches with a ragtime band. Try the Peruvian-style ceviche or Puerto Rican yuca mofongo at Booty’s (pictured; 800 Louisa St.), which serves a global street food menu.

Video: New Orleans Travel

Appeared as “The United States of Awesome: The Bywater, New Orleans” in T+L Magazine

Photo courtesy of Booty's

Neighborhood Buzz: Nashville's 12 South District

12 South: Imogene & Willie

Music City’s once-gritty 12 South district is on the rise, with 1920’s bungalows reimagined as locavore restaurants and stylish shops. T+L walks the line.

Go full Willy Wonka at Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, an Ohio import where the wackadoodle flavors include Riesling-poached pear and goat cheese with red cherries. Worth two scoops: “biscuits & peach jam,” inspired by the classic dish at nearby Loveless Café. 2312 12th Ave. S.

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Locals' Guide to Carmel Market, Tel Aviv

Carmel Market Tel Aviv

How to taste your way through Israel’s capital of cool? We asked the habitués of this historic quarter of food stalls and cafés for their picks.

Naeel Husein, Produce Vendor: “I eat at Miznon almost every day. It’s close to Carmel Market and serves pitas stuffed with grilled meats and vegetables.” 30 King George St.; 972-3/631-7688. $

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What to Wear in a Florence Cafe

What to Wear in a Florence Cafe

Three reasons we’d rather be in Florence right now: flaky cornetti, bracingly strong espresso, and that inimitable Italian sensibility. Here, how to fit in—plus a few places to get your fix.

The Locations: Take in the scene at Chiaroscuro, home to 30-minute coffee-tasting classes; the wood-paneled Caffè Cibrèo, where Isidoro Vodola has been perfecting his drinks for 25 years; and Caffè Florian, which recently added an airy art gallery.

The Look: Leather handbag by Salvatore Ferragamo. Cashmere-and-silk scarf, Loro Piana. Leather iPad case, Etro. Cat-eye sunglasses, Persol. Calfskin wallet, Bulgari. Lipstick in Scarlett, Dolce & Gabbana. Nine-karat rose-gold ring, Pomellato.

Related Links:
Best Places to Eat Like a Local
America’s Coolest Coffeehouses
Saving the Vienna Coffee Houses

Photo by James Wojcik

Melbourne's Restaurants Pay it Forward

Melbourne Restaurants: Charcoal Lane

In Melbourne, the latest wave of buzzy restaurants and bars share a common menu item: virtue.

One more reason to love Australia’s second city: a string of new establishments that are on a mission to pay it forward—without force-feeding the matter. Boho-chic hangout Shebeen serves up a globe-trotting menu of craft beers and cocktails, then hands 100 percent of its profits to charities in developing countries. Order a Sri Lanka–made Sinha Stout, for example, to support Room to Read, which helps develop children’s literacy skills throughout Asia and Africa.

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How to Drink Maté

How to Drink Maté

The tealike beverage is a favorite Argentinean tradition (even Pope Francis loves it), but it comes with a set of unwritten rules. Juan Carlos Cremona, owner of La Martina de Areco (54-23/2645-5011), a café in San Antonio de Areco, outside Buenos Aires, explains the ritual.

1. In groups, a cebador (leader) is chosen to serve everyone. He or she heats water to just below the boiling point, then pours it into a flask.

2. The gourd—a dried squash or a wood-lined metal goblet—holds the ground yerba maté leaves. Purists use a sieve to remove twigs.

3. The cebador moistens the grounds to release the flavor, inserts a bombilla (straw), adds more water, and passes the gourd to the first drinker.

4. On your turn, sip with gusto. Some add sugar or honey, but real gauchos take it amargo—bitter. When done, say “gracias” and pass it along.

5. Hungry? Locals often enjoy their maté with galletas dulces (sweet pastries).

Related Links:
How to Order Wine with Dinner
17 Airline Snacks We Want to Eat Right Now
Trip Doctor: How to Bring Back Food Souvenirs

Food as a Jet Lag Cure

food as a jet lag cure

Q: Are there any foods that will help me fight jet lag? —George Frank, Brooklyn, N.Y.

A: Even more than foreign-transaction fees and data-roaming charges, jet lag is the bane of international travelers. Resetting your internal clock to a new time zone can be a days-long process. Fortunately, there are ways to ease yourself onto a new schedule—and what you eat and drink can play a key role.

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How Long is Too Long to Linger at a Table?

lingering in a restaurant

Most good restaurants in the United States expect to turn over a table two to three times each night—that means they anticipate a party of two will stay for about an hour and 45 minutes (four-tops are usually allotted two hours). So once you’ve paid your bill, try not to spend the next hour nursing your final sip of wine. Internationally, diners enjoy a more leisurely pace. In Italy, for instance, experts say it’s virtually impossible to overstay your welcome. In countries from Australia and China to Argentina, meals typically run a full two to three hours. If you don’t know the protocol, look to the waitstaff for cues. They’ll let you know when your time’s up.

Related Links:
Travel Etiquette Do’s and Don’ts
Worldwide Guide to Restaurant Tipping
Craziest Travel Confessions

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@timeinc.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.


Photo by iStockphoto

Best New Food Apps and Websites

Food Apps: Viator

Looking to book a Shanghai street-food tour or a Provençal cooking class? Let these new food apps and sites take care of the legwork.

Best For Tailored Recommendations: Peek

Like an OpenTable for guided activities and food crawls, Peek (free; iOS) provides direct booking service straight from the app or website. Its real strength lies in its carefully curated content—all outings are vetted by Peek staff or trusted tastemakers. Take a quick personality quiz for customized suggestions.

Why Foodies Love It: Unique offerings—a dinner cruise on the Thames in London; a coffee plantation visit in Maui—are the rule, not the exception.

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Airport Food Gets an Upgrade

Airport Food

Gone are the days of rushing through security and jumping straight onto your flight—you can thank the TSA for that. “Travelers are spending more time in airports than ever,” says Frank Sickelsmith, vice president of restaurant development for HMS Host, one of two major firms that turn airports into epicurean hangouts. The upside? “Now they can have a full sit-down meal instead of grabbing and going.” And that’s where innovators like Sickelsmith come in.

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