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Manolo Blahnik Owners Are Now Selling…Milk?

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To drive past the soaring modern barns and lush pastures of Arethusa Farm Dairy in Litchfield, Connecticut, is to think: lucky cows. Light-years away from the rustic dairy farms that dot the nearby hills, Arethusa is the creation of Manolo Blahnik USA co-owners George Malkemus (president) and Tony Yurgaitis (vice president). These two sophisticated and urbane gentlemen have applied the same creative vision to—well—milk that the brand does to the curve of an insole or the proportion of an ankle strap. With the addition of a pristinely elegant creamery shop (822 Bantam Rd.; 860/361-6600) in nearby Bantam, ice cream, farmer cheese, Camembert, and yogurt are also for sale, providing a gastronomic experience as well as an aesthetic one. It’s all the proof we need that true style can be applied to anything.

Photo by Lee Clower

Three Celebrity-Hosted Vacations

celebrity chef Guy Savoy

Everyone has someone they admire—a certain chef, musician, or adventurer, perhaps. Here’s the chance to get up close and personal with your hero.

For the Foodie: The new gastronomic tour from renowned French chef Guy Savoy begins with lunch at his Paris restaurant (he’ll be there to greet you), where the menu is tailored to your next destination. This month, you’ll get whisked away on a jet to an oyster farm in Brittany; in November, you can create your own Cognac in Charente. The intimate trips end back where they started, with a meal hosted by the chef. From $7,000 (all-inclusive); Oct. 26–28 and Nov. 16–18.

For the Music Lover: At Hollywood, California’s Rock ’n’ Roll Fantasy Camp, you’ll form a band, get pointers from Kiss’s Paul Stanley, and take the stage at the Gibson Showroom. Leather pants not included. From $6,000 (includes most meals, a recording session, and evening activities); Nov. 10–13.

For the Space Junkie: Buzz Aldrin—the second man to walk on the moon—will speak to starstruck guests at Soneva Kiri by Six Senses Thailand, as part of the Exploratory Talkers’ Tables series. Doubles from $3,100, including meals; April 8, 2012.

Photo by Laurence Mouton

Five Inventive Fall Beer Flavors

the Bruery Autumn Maple beer

Small-batch breweries are mixing in inventive autumnal ingredients. Here, a taste of the season’s best.

Autumn Maple
Where to Try It: The Bruery, Placentia, Calif.
Tasting Notes: This Orange County brewery, in a former warehouse, has made headlines for its creative brews—including this sweet and spicy one made with 17 pounds of yams (yes, yams)—plus cinnamon, nutmeg, molasses, and maple syrup. 715 Dunn Way; 714/996-6258.

Fuego del Otoño
Where to Try It: Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales Café & Brewery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Tasting Notes: Head to the brewery’s laid-back restaurant for a sample of its annual fall release, a blend of anise, cinnamon, and Michigan-grown chestnuts that’s aged in oak barrels. The deep flavor also features the brand’s calling card—a smooth sourness, thanks to a special yeast. 311 S. Main St.; 734/913-2730.

Punkin Ale
Where to Try It: Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats, Rehoboth Beach, Del.
Tasting Notes: Pumpkin beer should complement pie, not taste like it. Luckily, founder Sam Calagione has mastered restraint: the taste of the fresh fall squash and hints of cinnamon and allspice are noticeable yet subtle—and are best enjoyed at the cozy brewpub. 320 Rehoboth Ave.; 302/226-2739.

Golden Delicious
Where to Try It: Captain Lawrence Brewing Co., Pleasantville, N.Y.
Tasting Notes: This gold-toned beer isn’t technically made with fruit—but a stint maturing in apple-brandy barrels at a cozy brewery lends it cider-like sweetness and a tart bite. 99 Castleton St.; 914/741-2337.

Babayaga
Where to Try It: At events throughout the Northeast.
Tasting Notes: Some of the barley malt in this stout—from the roaming brewery Pretty Things Beer & Ale Project—is smoked over rosemary. Who says the herb is just for hearty fall fare? 617/682-6419.

Photo by Lars Klove

London's Latest: Pop-Up Bar on a Parking Garage Roof

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Have you ever wondered what it may be like to sit and enjoy a drink from the top of a multi-storey car park? Probably not, but if you have then you can indulge your musings now through Sept. 30 at Frank’s Café atop a car park in South London's Peckham neighborhood. Classy!

Frank’s Cafe and Campari Bar is situated amidst the Bold Tendencies Sculpture Project atop a parking garage overlooking the city. (It's also part of the Henry Moore Foundation Year of Sculpture 2011). Designed by Practice Architecture, Frank’s Café and Campari Bar occupies a temporary building alongside the sculptures on the roof. And yes, parking is available.

Photo courtesy of Frank's Cafe and Campari Bar

Just Back: Chasing Summer on New York's Fire Island

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Its either unchecked hedonism or outright denial that led me to New Yorks Fire Island the weekend after summers unofficial demise. While most vacationers packed up their share-houses and kissed farewell to the spit of sand off Long Islands south coast over Labor Day, I was still dreaming of bike rides, summer ales, and one last coat of sun. It doesnt hurt that hotel prices fall off a cliff once beachgoers pack up their white (I paid $225 per night at Clegg's Hotel, while rates during summers apex can be double that). So I found myself at the Island Mermaid pulling on a straw filled with its signature Rocket Fuel (a dark rum piña colada with a Cruzan 151 sinker at the bottom and a pond of Amaretto floating on top) and stretching summer out as long as possible before the looming cold throws its death grip around New York City. I wasnt ready for fall, not yet.

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Hammer and Claws Blue Crab Feast Debuts in NYC

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Summer might technically end on September 21, but a few goodfolks are letting New Yorkers prolong the spirit: from September 23–25, the Hammer and Claws Blue Crab Feast will hit Chelsea for the first time, bringing an authentic, Maryland-style (steamed in beer, vinegar, and water, and dusted with Old Bay seasoning), all-you-can-eat blue crab feast right up to the Hudson Harbor. Tickets for each of the weekend’s four seatings cost $118, and include all the fixings—plus beer and cocktails. And it’s all for a good cause, no less.

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Espresso Meets Art: Anish Kapoor Designs Illy Cups

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It’s fitting that the artist behind Chicago’s iconic bean-shaped sculpture has now created an espresso cup. But not just any cup. Available as part of a limited-edition collection by Italian coffee brand Illy ($90 a pair), Anish Kapoor’s white porcelain demitasse has a slick, platinum interior. The saucer can be placed on top to produce a mini sculpture. One masterpiece with my espresso, please!

Photo courtesy of Illy

Korean Food Gets Mod Makeover in Seoul

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Leading Korea's new culinary wave is Jung Sik Dang, where chef Jung Sik Yim takes local ingredients to prepare dishes like kimchi consommé, pork jowl with yuzu, and even an amuse bouche with grasshoppers. Less experimental is Bistro Seoul, which presents Korean standards in an austere space. While Japanese and Chinese have long happily paid through their noses for expensive renditions of their cuisines, Koreans—like Thais—are just experiencing the phenomenon of taking familiar fare, gussying it up, and serving it in lovely locations. It’s not fusion, but modernization. You’re seeing this elsewhere in Asia—KL has some notable modern Malay restaurants. And while the Thais are kicking and screaming about this trend, other parts of Asia are embracing it.

Jennifer Chen is Travel + Leisure's Asia correspondent. You can follow her on Twitter at xiaochen6.

Photo of Jung Sik Dang courtesy of TomEats/www.tomeats.com

C’est l’amour! New York Welcomes Ladurée

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Yes, I'll confess. I'd never had a macaron until last night, when I braved the line, and the rain, for my first-ever taste of those light and lovely (and unequivocally French) treats by luxury Parisian patisserie Ladurée. No, I wasn't in the City of Love (though in love I fell…and hard). The brand’s newest outpost finally opened its doors to New York City, and America, last Tuesday, just in time for Fashion Week. And if that line, seemingly unabated since the opening, is any indication, this Upper East Side pastel-colored jewel is shaping up to be Manhattan’s next macaron mecca. (Move over, Bouchon Bakery!)

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Moscow: Where to Go Now

Bar Strelka

Set on an island in the heart of Moscow, the once-abandoned warehouses of the old Red October chocolate factory now house some of the city’s hippest galleries, restaurants, and rooftop bars.

For classic cucina italiana, check out Bontempi, a new locanda from Lombardy-born chef Valentino Bontempi. 12 Bersenevskaya Nab.; 7-495/223-1387; dinner for two $138.

With its spacious roof deck and innovative tapas (bocconcini and chile fritters), Bar Strelka—atop the Strelka design institute—draws a mix of local artists, intellectuals, and scenesters. 14 Bersenevskaya Nab.; 7-495/771-7437; drinks for two $25.

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