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Get Ready to Scream! World’s First Gelato Museum Opens in Italy

201210-b-gelato-museumjpg

It may not have a rhyming slogan all its own, but the world screams plenty for gelato. This week, enthusiasm for the extra-creamy Italian treat will culminate at the grand opening of the world’s first Gelato Museum in Bologna, Italy. Yes, gelato is finally immortalized in its very own museum. And, it's no surprise that the grand idea came from Carpigiani, one of Italy's early gelato innovators.

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New Beer Gardens Grow in San Francisco

Biergarten

Is San Francisco the new Munich? With a crop of new German-style drinking establishments in the city, it would seem so. At the uber-popular, 100-seat Biergarten (above) in Hayes Valley, you can sip your brew while sitting on one of the authentic German beer garden benches. There’s plenty of outdoor seating at the new Southern Pacific Brewing Company (below), a big, beautiful brewery that opened in a warehouse in an industrial corner of the Mission earlier this year.

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Great Wine Bars in Paris

Paris Wine Bars: Legrand Filles et Fils

The recent rage for wine bars reflects a change in the way the French think—and drink.

I’ve been visiting Paris since the 1970’s. But on a recent trip, I noted something radically unfamiliar. At Verjus, a new hot spot by the Palais Royal, a roomful of people were sipping Chinon and Chenin Blanc by the glass, not a dinner plate in sight.

Wine bars have always seemed the antithesis of how the French experience wine. While Americans gravitate toward big-bodied creations with the kick of a cocktail, the French favor restraint, seeing it as a piece of a larger prandial puzzle. An aperitif in Paris has always meant a Lillet, a kir, maybe a beer. Wines by the glass were usually barely drinkable vin ordinaire.

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Snarky Foodies Unite: Upload Your In-Flight Meal

In-Flight Meal

For anyone who’s felt a certain despair when setting out for a transcontinental flight—after being offered nothing but a cardboard box of crackers, cheese and deli meat that most 2nd graders would find gastronomically unsatisfying—there is a vivid outlet for your culinary bitterness.

Airlinemeals.net actually started 10 years ago, when frequent flier Marco t'Hart decided to upload some shots of terrible meals he’s had (if not eaten) aloft, and invited other travelers to do the same.

Today the site has grown 26,000 images strong, and is reportedly getting more attention from airline catering companies, which are sifting through the reviews to help improve in-cabin dining—and which no doubt will enable coach-class food critics even more.

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Hong Kong Trend Report: Down on the Urban Farm

HK Farm

Out of all the places to have a farming renaissance, who would guess uber-urban Hong Kong? But it’s true: concerns about food safety in China coupled with a rising interest in the provenance and quality of ingredients has sparked action. HK Farm is a 4,000-square-foot rooftop farm in industrial Ngau Tau Kok started by a group of artists and designers, with plans to expand. Zen Organic is a former pig farm that a pair of siblings inherited and turned into one of the city’s most sought-after sources of produce. Down with pollution and in with the greens! 

Photo by Glenn Eugen Ellingsen / HK Farm

Top Notch Scotch at Montage Hotel Beverly Hills

Ten Pound at Montage Beverly Hills

Want a definition of great service? Sink into an armchair at £10, the semisecret Macallan scotch bar at the Montage Beverly Hills, and let your barman go to work. He’ll wheel out a mahogany cart stocked with Lalique crystal glassware, chilled soapstone rocks (for those who frown on dilution), and an array of rare single malts, with which he’ll prepare the best damn scotch you’ve ever had. Maybe it’s the distillery’s smoky, spicy 18-year Sherry Oak ($35). Or the Macallan 64 Years Old, a goblet of which will set you back $64,000, not including tip. You should tip well.

Photo by Jessica Sample

Travel Back in Time with Vintage Menus

Vintage Menus: Muse restaurant

While the pyrotechnics of Alinea’s molecular gastronomy and the tweezer-armed chefs at Noma fussing over strands of seaweed may garner all the accolades in the food world these days, other chefs are turning back the clock. They’re going back decades, even hundreds, of years.

Vintage-inspired menus—think Champagne-glazed Virginia hams, Waldorf pudding studded with nuggets of foie gras, poached salmon bathed in creamy French sauces—took off this year when restaurants across the country commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Titanic’s demise.

At Prime Meats in Brooklyn, diners paid $150 in April to taste the last meal served on the British ship, supposedly crafted under the consultation of Georges-Auguste Escoffier and Cesar Ritz. A Hindenburg dinner may follow.

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Q+A: Grizzly Bear's Ed Droste Talks Travel

Grizzly Bear band

Members of the band, from left: Ed Droste, Chris Bear, Chris Taylor and Daniel Rossen

Ed Droste—front man of the Brooklyn-based indie-rock band Grizzly Bear, whose long-awaited fourth album Shields comes out on September 18—reflects on some of his favorite destinations and findings from around the world.

Q: It’s been three years since the band’s last album, what can we expect from Shields?
A:
It’s charged, and sort of raw, energetic and exposed. I started out work shopping ideas in Todos Santos, Mexico with our drummer Chris Bear. We often go on little writing retreats together. We went there for a month and wrote ten songs, then the whole band reconvened in Marfa, Texas for a month to start recording.

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Win Free Beer (and a Trip to Denver)

How do we know when a city is serious about beer? When the tourism office shoots an entire video around the local craft brewers. When visitors rank it atop the list of best cities for microbrews. And when that city sets aside nine whole days to pay a sudsy tribute to hops and yeast.

That city is Denver, Colorado. The video is above. The ranking is part of our America’s Favorite Cities survey. And those nine magical days happen from October 5–13 during an event called (appropriately enough) the Denver Beer Fest, which finishes up (appropriately enough) with the three-day Great American Beer Festival.

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San Francisco Pop-Ups Settle for Brick-and-Mortar

Wise Sons Delicatessen

It’s a city of pop-ups. San Francisco has bred a myriad of mobile food entrepreneurs who blog, tweet and serve up everything from ramen to fish tacos to loyal customers willing to hit the sidewalk. That’s about to change—slightly. Recently, some pop-ups have gone permanent, shouldering leases and outfitting commercial spaces. A few of the city’s newest restaurant fixtures? Radio Africa Kitchen (below), which serves creative Ethiopian food, recently opened up shop in Bayview. Meanwhile, the super-popular ramen/boba tea spot Ken-Ken Ramen has launched in the Mission. If deli is your thing, don’t miss the outpost of Wise Sons Delicatessen (above)for some of the city’s best bialys and challah.

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