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6 Places to Eat in Paris

Places to Eat in Paris: Claus

Our abridged, meal-by-meal guide to where to eat now.

Breakfast

Oeuf à la coque at Claus: The perfectly cooked four-minute organic egg at this book-ahead épicerie-café comes in an adorable hand-sewn chick-shaped cozy. 14 Rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau, First Arr.; no dinner. $

Lunch

Turbot rôti at Les Jalles: A chic crowd fills the Deco-tinged spot for such modern bistro dishes as oven-roasted turbot, which comes with salsify, marrow, and potatoes au gratin. 14 Rue des Capucines, Second Arr. $$$

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Best Pizza in Chicago

Best pizza in Chicago: Coalfire

Deep dish is but one slice of the scene in Chicago, winner for Best Pizza in our America’s Favorite Cities survey. We tapped resident Heather Sperling, an editor at tastingtable.com, for her favorites.

Coalfire (pictured), in West Town, is my go-to for a meaty pie. I love the margherita pizza topped with ’nduja, an oily, spicy Calabrian-style sausage.”

“Perfectly chewy, blistered pizza is baked in a brick oven at Lincoln Park’s Pizzeria da Nella. The owner comes from a long line of Italian pizzaioli.”

“Pan-style fanatics flock to Burt’s Place, in the suburb of Morton Grove. It’s legendary for its buttery, caramelized crust.”

Check out all of America's Best Cities for Pizza.

Photo courtesy of Coalfire Pizza

Après-ski? Après Vous: 5 Great Après-ski Traditions on the East Coast

Whiteface Lodge

Last month I reported on great après-ski traditions at resorts out West. Don't worry, East Coasters, here are four top-notch resorts closer to home, each with an après-ski scene to rival anything in the Rockies.

 
In the Adirondack region of New York, Whiteface Lodge's signature après-ski drink is the Campfire, a soothing blend of bourbon, local apple cider, scotch, and sage. Where better to enjoy a liquid Campfire than by an actual campfire? The Lodge agrees, and has built two large lean-tos around a fire pit. Cushy seating, blankets, and mountain views allow guests to relax under the stars while still enjoying the comforts of resort life. And a direct phone line to the hotel concierge means that a Campfire by the campfire need never be far away.

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Classy Cocktails from Hotel Bel-Air: Tips from a Top Mixologist

At the Hotel Bel-Air in Beverly Hills, head bartender Allen Allam will teach you secrets of the Japanese hard-shake method for mixing bespoke cocktails. During an hour-long class in the lustrous bar lounge, learn the recipe for such signature drinks as Dragon's Fire and Monroe's Passion, a potent fusion of ginger juice, fresh passion fruit puree, Thai chili syrup and Barcardi 151 rum. (Actress Marilyn Monroe was a regular at the Bel-Air.) Other tricks of the bar trade are also revealed. Allam demonstrates techniques for stirring and garnish cutting, as well as how to employ essential barware like slow-frozen Clinebell ice, stainless steel muddlers and gold-plated strainers. Beverage director Rob Harpest provides colorful cocktail history commentary as Allam pours. Afterwards, slip into one of the lounge's banquettes under larger-than-life celebrity portraits to further your liquid research. From $100 per person, minimum six per class, 14-day advance reservation required.

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Smile! There's a New Trend in Medical Tourism

smile

New evidence suggests dental tourism is skyrocketing, with a now estimated one million people traveling outside their home country for affordable dental treatments and enhancements. According to medical travel resource Patients Without Borders, most tooth tourists are from the U.S., with Europe a close second—with the majority seeking implants, crowns, root canals, and smile makeovers.

And while Hungary, Poland, Thailand, India, and Singapore are fast emerging as top spots for dental work, some are traveling to the U.S. for treatments. Call it Reverse Dental Tourism. And it makes sense, given Americans' worldwide reputation for flaunting mouthfuls of pearly whites. But these aren't your average bargain-hunting snaggle-toothed tourists.

Dr. Michael Apa, a partner in New York-based Rosenthal-Apa Group and pioneer in Facial Aesthetic Design, is one of the world's top cosmetic dentists. Beyond catering to celebrities such as Matt Dillon, Chloë Sevigny, and the Trumps, he also services many of the Middle East's royal families, who pay upwards of $30,000 for his mouth makeovers—and who decamp to New York City for weeks at a time. As a result, Dr. Apa not only helps people looks years younger with porcelain veneers and facial asymmetry adjustments, but his practice also acts as de facto concierge and travel advisor. He was recently honored with a Five-Star Diamond Award from the American Academy of Hospitality Science for being "One of the Finest Dentists Worldwide." Travel + Leisure recently caught up with the doctor in NYC:

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Q+A: Gael Garcia Bernal on Chile and Mexico

Gael Garcia Bernal

For his Academy Award-nominated film No, the Mexican star traveled to Santiago, Chile, to portray the young ad exec who helped oust General Augusto Pinochet in 1988. T+L caught up with the peripatetic actor.

Q: What stood out most about Chile?
A: It’s the only country where a dictator has been toppled democratically. A fantastic place to visit is the General Cemetery; the whole history is buried there and you can see how the classes are divided. And Chile faces the sea, so there’s a strong coastal culture.

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Eataly Extends Its Culinary Reign

Eataly

Ever since Oscar Farinetti opened Eataly, his innovative Italian food and wine market in Turin, Italy, he has been teaming up with chefs worldwide to create new locations throughout Italy, Japan, and the United States.

Folks may have heard about the Eataly in the Flatiron District of New York City, a 50,000-square-foot, multi-level space with the finest Italian produce, meat, bread, cheese, etc., an Italy travel agency, home goods shop, and more. (The focaccia alone is worth the trip.)

This past June, another Eataly, opened in Rome, located in a former railway station at Ostiense. The 170,000-square-foot, four-story building contains 18 restaurants, a cooking school, and wine and food stores stocked with Italian artisanal produce. There is also a beer cellar with artisanal beers by Birra del Borgo and Teo Musso's Baladin.

In the United States, be on the lookout for Eataly’s Chicago location, scheduled to open autumn 2013.

Maria Pedone is a digital editorial intern at Travel + Leisure.

Photo by Fabrizio Zanelli.

City Guides for Coffee Lovers

Best Coffee city guides

I’m guilty of both a caffeine addiction and a picky palate, so easily tracking down coffee spots is fairly critical to my enjoyment of a city. It’s not rocket science abroad, where quality shakeratos and Nesfrappes are the lay of the land, but domestically, we’re still getting our sea legs when it comes to a good cup of Joe. That’s where the Best Coffee city guides come into play: the collection of iPhone, Android, and iPad apps points travelers in the direction of reputable cafes, provides tips on what to order at each spot, and—for the uber geeky among us—denotes the types of beans, grinders, and machines employed there.

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Crowdsourcing: What to Do When You're on the Las Vegas Strip

We asked true travel pros what to do near the Las Vegas Strip. Want to share your expertise? Join our community on Facebook at facebook.com/travelandleisure and at Twitter @TravlandLeisure.


View Las Vegas Strip in a larger map

“For a great view of the Bellagio fountains (and wonderful crêpes), stop by the Sugar Factory (3655 Las Vegas Blvd. S.).” —Michelle Nolan, via Facebook

“Don’t miss the olive-oil ice cream with grapefruit at José Andrés’s Jaleo, in the Cosmopolitan.” —Bhadri Kubendran, via Facebook

“Take a relaxing break from the Strip at the Mandarin Oriental.” @lassers

“The best people-watching is in the Crystals shopping arcade at City Center.” —Alex Walters, via Facebook

“Bundle up and hit the Minus 5 Ice Lounge (3770 Las Vegas Blvd. S.) at Monte Carlo—you drink out of ice glasses!” —Irina Adler, via Facebook

Public House (3355 Las Vegas Blvd. S.) is a new gastropub with an impressive selection of beers.” —Erin de Santiago-Domue, via Facebook

NYC Restaurant Hosts Ultra-Luxurious Culinary Ski Trips to French Alps

luxury food

Sometimes we all need a little more luxury in our life. Maybe even a lot more luxury. That’s what Donna Lennard, owner of New York’s il Buco restaurant group, must have had in mind when she announced her latest culinary endeavor—a food, wine, and ski adventure at private chalets in the heart of France's Alpine resort town Courchevel. This ultra-extravagant vacation is also ultra-expensive (sticker shock: $50,000-$150,000 per chalet per week).

Why so pricey?

For starters, it's in a great location. Courchevel is part of the famed Les Trois Vallées region, which is the world's largest connected ski area and offers hundreds of miles of ski runs that connect three Alpine valleys.

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