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Dogpatch: San Francisco's Newest Creative Neighborhood

Dogpatch, San Francisco

Take a vibrant mix of Victorians and historic warehouses. Fill them with inventive boutiques and restaurants. Add an industrial waterfront district—and you’ve got San Francisco’s newest creative epicenter.

Yellow Building

The area’s beating heart is an 1890’s stable that now houses Piccino ($$)—a convivial restaurant dedicated to thin-crust pizzas and small plates—as well as an outpost of Modern Appealing Clothing, known for avant-garde fashions, and Dig, a wine shop and bar. Minnesota and 22nd Sts.

Workshop Residence

Head here for goods crafted by hand on-site, including silk crepe dresses from Paris-based designer Aurore Thibout and wood-and-leather wedges from local artisan Martha Davis. 833 22nd St.

Chocolate Lab

Cult brand Recchiuti Confections’ long-awaited café serves rich desserts such as mandarin-chocolate-mousse cake and lime-meringue tartlets. A few doors down is Little Nib, their new retail shop. 801 22nd St.

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World Peace on the Lower East Side: Beurre et Sel Cookie Shop Opens

Dorie Greenspan



Tiny, prolific cookbook author Dorie Greenspan has opened a tiny bakeshop, Beurre et Sel, in the Essex St. Market on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. With about the same square footage as a Midtown elevator, the bright and minimal space still packs a punch with an array of rich, buttery cookies. You can have your trendy cupcakes and doughnuts, I’ll take one of her divine World Peace cookies, please: bittersweet chips of Valhrona chocolate and flakes of fleur de sel in a dense chocolate sable cookie.

Ann Shields is a senior digital editor at Travel + Leisure.

Trip Report: Sleeping in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka

Three years after the country’s 26-year civil war ended, Sri Lanka’s recovery is well underway. I spent two weeks traveling in Sri Lanka at the end of January and was amazed by the changes taking place. Colombo, the capital, is unrecognizable. Old colonial buildings once enshrouded in barbed wire and concrete walls are now out in the open, with fresh coats of paint. A few major restoration projects have turned historic buildings into dining and shopping destinations.

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Crowdsourcing: What to Do When You’re on Cape Cod


View Cape Cod in a larger map

We asked true travel pros what to do on Cape Cod. Want to share your expertise? Join our community on Facebook at facebook.com/travelandleisure and at Twitter @TravlandLeisure.

“Go to Napi’s restaurant (7 Freeman St.), on a Provincetown side street. We usually order the “king’s feast for two”: bouillabaisse topped with a 1 1/4-pound lobster.” —Ricky Coombs, via Facebook

“A French native owns Wellfleet’s PB Boulangerie Bistro (15 Lecount Hollow Rd.) (no surprise: it’s beyond delicious).” —@jesslaniew

“After a beach day, a movie at Wellfleet Drive-In is a relaxing, Cape-style throwback.” —Carol Intravaia, via Facebook

“Nauset Beach (Orleans) is gorgeous! Look for the food shack on the sand for the best onion rings ever.” —@rabbilaufer

“Need a nightcap? The Chatham Squire has been a legend since 1968.” —Suzanne Corcoran, via Facebook

Photographer Todd Selby’s Latest Book

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It all started with a website, where photographer Todd Selby posted shots of his friends in their homes. Next came a project with Louis Vuitton, a spin-off book, and, most recently, a column in The New York Times T Magazine. It’s this latest development—scrapbook-y pages of playful illustrations, hand-written notes, and photographs of people in the food world—in which Selby seems to have found his calling. It even inspired his second book, Edible Selby, out this month. Here’s an inside look:

How did you end up focusing on food-related spaces? My first book, The Selby is In Your Place, did well, and I started thinking about what I wanted to do next. My passion has always been food and cooking and eating and restaurants and chefs, and I thought I could figure out a way to approach the food world in a new way.

How would you describe the book? It has a feeling of a photo book meets a cookbook, but more than anything it’s a travel guide. You can look through it and get fun ideas for places to visit.

How did you discover the places? The best stuff in the book was very much word of mouth. I talked to chef Ignacio Mattos at New York’s Il Buco Alimentari, and he knew all these people who were connected to Chez Panisse. From them I met this guy who told me about this fisherman who told me about the guy who does Japanese catering.

What was one of your favorite finds? Hartwood in Tulum. The chef ended up being on the cover. I would call this a chef’s fantasy. It was so DIY—just the him and his wife creating the ultimate chef’s table, piled high with vegetables from the jungle.

What was your most memorable meal from the road? This old man has a restaurant on a cliff in Mallorca, and he makes paella over a fire. You can only get there by boat. Actually, you can also hike down to it, but the chicer way is to take a boat. He’s had it since the 70’s. One of the people there said Halle Berry and Tom Hanks had recently visited, so it’s not a secret anymore.

What about back home in New York? I’m an investor with Mission Chinese, and I’m obsessed with the catfish soup. It has pink peppercorn, so it’s a bit numbing; I just get into this zone where I’m eating it and I’m sweating, and it’s just incredible. I also love the bakery Four and Twenty Blackbirds in Brooklyn. The sad thing is I’ve seen what they put in the pies. With pastry it’s better to never know. I got the pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving this year; if you’re not on the waiting list right now then forget it.

2012-headshot-brooke-porterjpg Brooke Porter is an Associate Editor at Travel + Leisure

Photo of Todd Selby courtesy Hadassa Haack

Trend Watch: Community-Supported Restaurants

Community-Supported Restaurant: Lenoir

First came food co-ops, then CSAs, then buy-your-own-raw-milk clubs. Next up: community-supported restaurants. A natural next step in the increasing obsession with hyper-local food, CSRs allow customers to become small investors in local eateries, giving them perks such as free meals—as well as a vested interest in seeing the restaurant succeed. For travelers, dining at a CSR means eating somewhere that is truly rooted in the surrounding community. We think these six new CSRs are worth checking out. If you agree, you can always buy in.

Rock Hill, South Carolina: Lell’s Café
This two-year-old spot features hearty, down-home cooking (bacon and pimento cheese sandwich; vanilla-bourbon sticky-finger French toast) made with seasonal Carolina ingredients. It opened with no bank loans, just the support of community investors.

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Photographer Annie Leibovitz Takes a Shot

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Photographer Annie Leibovitz has captured volumes through the prism of her camera lens during a storied career shooting rock stars, celebrities, and politicians for venerable publications like Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. But a photo campaign for a whiskey? That’s a first for Leibovitz, who was commissioned by Macallan for the third instillation of their Masters of Photography series, capturing portraits of Scottish Actor Kevin Mckidd (Grey’s Anatomy) across Manhattan. The images will be featured on four limited edition single casks—Library, Gallery, Bar, Skyline—aged between 16 and 23 years. But you’ll have to loosen the purse strings if you want a bottle from this rare batch; the 1,000-bottle collection retails for a hefty $2,750 a pop.

Nate Storey is an editorial assistant at Travel + Leisure.

Images courtesy of The Macallan.

Get Ready to Scream! World’s First Gelato Museum Opens in Italy

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It may not have a rhyming slogan all its own, but the world screams plenty for gelato. This week, enthusiasm for the extra-creamy Italian treat will culminate at the grand opening of the world’s first Gelato Museum in Bologna, Italy. Yes, gelato is finally immortalized in its very own museum. And, it's no surprise that the grand idea came from Carpigiani, one of Italy's early gelato innovators.

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New Beer Gardens Grow in San Francisco

Biergarten

Is San Francisco the new Munich? With a crop of new German-style drinking establishments in the city, it would seem so. At the uber-popular, 100-seat Biergarten (above) in Hayes Valley, you can sip your brew while sitting on one of the authentic German beer garden benches. There’s plenty of outdoor seating at the new Southern Pacific Brewing Company (below), a big, beautiful brewery that opened in a warehouse in an industrial corner of the Mission earlier this year.

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Great Wine Bars in Paris

Paris Wine Bars: Legrand Filles et Fils

The recent rage for wine bars reflects a change in the way the French think—and drink.

I’ve been visiting Paris since the 1970’s. But on a recent trip, I noted something radically unfamiliar. At Verjus, a new hot spot by the Palais Royal, a roomful of people were sipping Chinon and Chenin Blanc by the glass, not a dinner plate in sight.

Wine bars have always seemed the antithesis of how the French experience wine. While Americans gravitate toward big-bodied creations with the kick of a cocktail, the French favor restraint, seeing it as a piece of a larger prandial puzzle. An aperitif in Paris has always meant a Lillet, a kir, maybe a beer. Wines by the glass were usually barely drinkable vin ordinaire.

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