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How to Drink Maté

How to Drink Maté

The tealike beverage is a favorite Argentinean tradition (even Pope Francis loves it), but it comes with a set of unwritten rules. Juan Carlos Cremona, owner of La Martina de Areco (54-23/2645-5011), a café in San Antonio de Areco, outside Buenos Aires, explains the ritual.

1. In groups, a cebador (leader) is chosen to serve everyone. He or she heats water to just below the boiling point, then pours it into a flask.

2. The gourd—a dried squash or a wood-lined metal goblet—holds the ground yerba maté leaves. Purists use a sieve to remove twigs.

3. The cebador moistens the grounds to release the flavor, inserts a bombilla (straw), adds more water, and passes the gourd to the first drinker.

4. On your turn, sip with gusto. Some add sugar or honey, but real gauchos take it amargo—bitter. When done, say “gracias” and pass it along.

5. Hungry? Locals often enjoy their maté with galletas dulces (sweet pastries).

Related Links:
How to Order Wine with Dinner
17 Airline Snacks We Want to Eat Right Now
Trip Doctor: How to Bring Back Food Souvenirs

Food as a Jet Lag Cure

food as a jet lag cure

Q: Are there any foods that will help me fight jet lag? —George Frank, Brooklyn, N.Y.

A: Even more than foreign-transaction fees and data-roaming charges, jet lag is the bane of international travelers. Resetting your internal clock to a new time zone can be a days-long process. Fortunately, there are ways to ease yourself onto a new schedule—and what you eat and drink can play a key role.

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How Long is Too Long to Linger at a Table?

lingering in a restaurant

Most good restaurants in the United States expect to turn over a table two to three times each night—that means they anticipate a party of two will stay for about an hour and 45 minutes (four-tops are usually allotted two hours). So once you’ve paid your bill, try not to spend the next hour nursing your final sip of wine. Internationally, diners enjoy a more leisurely pace. In Italy, for instance, experts say it’s virtually impossible to overstay your welcome. In countries from Australia and China to Argentina, meals typically run a full two to three hours. If you don’t know the protocol, look to the waitstaff for cues. They’ll let you know when your time’s up.

Related Links:
Travel Etiquette Do’s and Don’ts
Worldwide Guide to Restaurant Tipping
Craziest Travel Confessions

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@timeinc.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.


Photo by iStockphoto

Best New Food Apps and Websites

Food Apps: Viator

Looking to book a Shanghai street-food tour or a Provençal cooking class? Let these new food apps and sites take care of the legwork.

Best For Tailored Recommendations: Peek

Like an OpenTable for guided activities and food crawls, Peek (free; iOS) provides direct booking service straight from the app or website. Its real strength lies in its carefully curated content—all outings are vetted by Peek staff or trusted tastemakers. Take a quick personality quiz for customized suggestions.

Why Foodies Love It: Unique offerings—a dinner cruise on the Thames in London; a coffee plantation visit in Maui—are the rule, not the exception.

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Airport Food Gets an Upgrade

Airport Food

Gone are the days of rushing through security and jumping straight onto your flight—you can thank the TSA for that. “Travelers are spending more time in airports than ever,” says Frank Sickelsmith, vice president of restaurant development for HMS Host, one of two major firms that turn airports into epicurean hangouts. The upside? “Now they can have a full sit-down meal instead of grabbing and going.” And that’s where innovators like Sickelsmith come in.

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World's Best Airlines for Food

airline food chefs

The winners, according to our annual reader poll.

Domestic

Virgin America 82.08
JetBlue Airways 74.18
Hawaiian Airlines 71.59

The demise of free meal service in economy class has meant the rise of better buy-on-board options. To wit: Virgin America earns raves for its on-demand dining via seatback touch screen and snacks from home-grown artisanal brands, such as San Francisco’s Humphry Slocombe ice cream. JetBlue is a favorite for its Terra chips and boxed meals (try the roast beef sandwich); starting in June, Mint seat fliers can sample a small-plates menu by New York’s Saxon & Parole. Hawaiian Airlines bucked the cost-cutting trend: it’s the only U.S. airline to still serve complimentary meals on domestic flights in coach. The onboard snack bar keeps it local, selling everything from Spam musubi to macadamia nuts.

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Next Great Neighborhod in Paris: Sentier District

Sentier Paris

Once a no-man’s-land overrun by wholesalers, the Sentier district, in the northern part of the Second Arrondissement, has become the city’s neighborhood du jour, pioneered by chef Grégory Marchand and his emerging Frenchie empire. Its new anchor: day-to-night hangout Edgar Hotel ($$$), whose casual lobby restaurant serves simple Scandi-tinged dishes such as smoked herring with beets and crème fraîche, and the world’s best frites. See below for a rue-by-rue primer.

All 13 rooms at Edgar Hotel, a former textile workshop, are by a different designer—from upholstery scion Pierre Frey Jr. (stripes; tonal linen) to Carole Caufman, style director of Petit Bateau (sorbet colors; clean lines). 31 Rue d’Alexandrie. $$

New grocery Terroirs d’Avenir has chef-worthy sources. Snap up the same strictly seasonal Kintoa pork, line-caught fish, organic cheese, and AOC charcuterie as all the best restaurants. 7 Rue du Nil; 33-1/45-08-48-80.

Expansive and colorful cocktail bar La Conserverie serves miso salmon bento boxes and neatly composed boissons, such as a refreshing fizz made with Plantation Original Dark Overproof rum, Becherovka (Czech herbal bitters), pear syrup, and lime. 37 bis Rue du Sentier.

Anglo-ish cafés are the trend of the moment, but Lockwood has something extra: by day, it’s a coffee shop serving biscuits and gravy; at night, the cryptlike downstairs bar opens, the Jimi Hendrix gets pumped, and the fried chicken and cocktails come out. (The chef is a Texan, and it shows.) 73 Rue d’Aboukir. $$$

Don’t let the Sentier’s endless parade of shiny sportswear put you off: 58M—a calm accessories boutique with Lanvin bags and Michel Vivien’s dignified-sexy heels—is just a few blocks south. 58 Rue Montmartre.

Doughnuts, cheesecake, pastrami on rye—Frenchie To Go serves American classics inspired by Grégory Marchand’s time cooking in New York. His Yankee-approved, deli-style secrets extend to a roster of house-made sauces (Russian dressing; harissa) and drinks (ginger beer; orange pressée). 9 Rue du Nil. $$

Video: The Upper Marais, Another Up-and-Coming Paris Neighborhood

Hotels
$ Less than $200
$$ $200 to $350
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$$$$ $500 to $1,000
$$$$$ More than $1,000

Restaurants
$ Less than $25
$$ $25 to $75
$$$ $75 to $150
$$$$ More than $150

Related Links:
Top Vacation Spots
Europe's Best Places to Eat Like a Local
How to Rent an Apartment in Paris

Photo by Matthieu Salvaing

Four Reasons to Explore Istria, Croatia Now

Istria

The Istrian Peninsula has all the knockout beauty of the Dalmatian Coast—without the crowds. We found four reasons to explore.

Because its islands and beaches are still a (relative) secret. Leave Venice to the cruise ships. Just across the Adriatic, Istria is laid-back and idyllic—and rocky beaches abound. In Kamenjak Park, near Pula, cliff-jumping into the sea is a pastime. Farther north, you’ll find the popular sunbathing spot Monte Beach, reached via steep stone steps, and the wildly beautiful Golden Bay. Board the crewed wooden cruiser Delfin, based in Rovinj, for daylong trips to outlying fjords and archipelagoes, with stops at St. Andrew (where you can visit a sixth-century monastery), lush St. Katarina Island, and the St. John lighthouse.

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Six Barcelona Restaurants to Try Now

Barcelona Restaurants: Pakta

Our abridged, meal-by-meal guide to where and what to eat now.

Breakfast: Fried egg with Potato at L’Eggs
Start the day with chef Paco Pérez’s gently fried hen’s egg at his new ou-centric spot in L’Eixample. It’s flecked with black garlic, draped in crisp jamón, and served on a pile of potato batons. $15.

Lunch: Meatball Escudella at El 300 del Born
At this historic El Born market turned cultural center, Jordi Vilà puts his own spin on Catalan classics. Here, he uses truffles to elevate deep bowls of traditional pork-meatball soup. $12.

Snack: “Rocadillo” at Roca Bar
The Roca brothers—the trio behind the acclaimed (and impossible-to-book) El Celler de Can Roca, in Girona—serve drop-in bites at this accessible offshoot in the Hotel Omm. We love the warm brioches stuffed with lightly smoked eel. $14.

Video: Barcelona Port Guide

Dinner: Sea Bass Ceviche at Pakta (pictured)
Albert Adrià’s happening spot specializes in Japanese-Peruvian Nikkei cuisine. A highlight of the 24-course tasting menu: this tangy white fish served raw with kumquats and leche de tigre (a citrus-based marinade). $124 for 24-course menu.

Dessert: “La Cirera” at La Pastisseria
At his L’Eixample boutique, pastry chef Josep Rodríguez Guerola displays sweet treats like jewels, such as the glazed cherry mousse on a crumbly base of almond and milk-chocolate cookies. $6.

To Go: Jamón in a Cone at Enrique Tomás
Spain’s leading purveyor of jamón ibérico sells ruby slivers of fatty, acorn-fed ham in grab-and-go form. At the Carrer de Pelai flagship in the Barri Gòtic, pick up a bamboo funnel filled with ham shavings for the plane ride home. $6.

Related Links:
Barcelona Travel Guide
T+L’s Definitive Guide to Barcelona
Locals’ Guide to Barcelona

Photo by Miquel Gonzalez

Insider's Guide to Provence From the Owner of Fig & Olive

Provence: Musée d’Art Classique

Every year, Laurent Halasz—founder and owner of the Fig & Olive restaurants in New York and California—returns to his childhood home of Mougins, on France’s Côte d’Azur, for scenic hikes and inspiration from his mother’s kitchen. Here, he takes us on a tour of the medieval hilltop village.

Eat: La Place de Mougins ($$$$), in a Provençal house, is such a pleasure. Last time I had beef consommé with foie gras and chocolate. For cocktails, don’t miss the classic Piscine, champagne on ice with strawberries, at L’Amandier ($$$). And I grew up on olive oil pressed locally at Moulin Baussy, in nearby Spéracèdes.”

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