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Miami Art Week Kicks Off

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Miami Art Week kicks-off another year of buzzworthy fairs this week, drawing the international cognoscenti for the latest round of high-priced purchases and ritzy parties. It’s an especially notable time for a culture scene whose boundless growth has shifted the art world’s center of gravity toward South Florida—the glittering Pérez Art Museum Miami’s debut is the latest jaw-dropping splash, and hotels like The Betsy have a full slate of arts programming—exhibits, meet-the-artist events, and more.

As its cachet continues to rise, T+L sat down with Art Miami Director Nick Korniloff to get the scoop on the 2013 rendition. 

Q: What are the can't-miss exhibitions at Art Miami this year?

A: The 2014 edition of Art Miami will provide an unprecedented group of high-quality galleries from around the globe that will have a selection of works at the forefront of the contemporary market. The fair will have three distinct curated projects—Check Out (above), Think Big and Zoom In (below)—that clearly define the overall depth, diversity, and quality of the Art Miami Fair. Each project area incorporates large-scale sculpture, flat work, video, and new media. In addition, we will have a special exhibition of Banksy original works, including one piece from his recent NY residency program.

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(Travel) Agents of Change: PhoCusWright Announces Winners of its 2013 Travel Innovation Summit

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All sweat and nerves and butterflies last night, some 30 next-gen travel innovators eagerly awaited the results of this year's PhoCusWright Travel Innovation Summit. Which start-up would be crowned the industry's next change agent? After two days of schmoozing, courting VCs, and convincing the travel industry's top players they they were the Next Big Thing, only one young company would walk away with the coveted top prize: General Catalyst Award for Travel Innovation.

The competition was stiff—and the stakes high. A win all but guaranteed a steady stream of calls from investors.

“This year’s presenting companies are amongst the most exciting we’ve seen present to date at The Travel Innovation Summit,” said PhoCusWright vice president, research Douglas Quinby.

Not surprisingly, it was a tough decision for this year's panel of judges—made up top travel and technology experts—to choose from this already elite group of companies hailing from across the U.S., and as far away as Russia, Melbourne, and India. But there could only be one winner.

SafelyStay, an Atlanta-based start-up that powers safe and instant vacation rental reservations for online travel agencies, vacation rental marketplaces and property managers, walked away with the title, and $250K.

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Q+A with My Yacht Group Founder Nicholas Frankl

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The Formula One U.S. Grand Prix—where some of the world's fastest and most expensive cars will compete—kicks off tomorrow in Austin, Texas. People travel from all over the world to attend.

On the eve of the second-to-last race of the season, we thought we’d check in with Nicholas Frankl, die-hard F1 fan, founder of My Yacht Group, Olympian bobsledder (who has a friendly but competitive bobsledding rivalry with HSH Prince Albert of Monaco), and collector of many things—yachts, cars, and, yes, even refrigerator magnets.

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New Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts Features Martha Graham Dance Company

Beverly Hills opened the new Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts last month and has now inaugurated the venue, a former historic post office, restored, repurposed, and expanded, in grand style with performances by the Martha Graham Dance Company. It is no exaggeration to state that Martha Graham is and remains an icon of modern dance. And the company she launched in 1926 remains contemporary both because of Graham’s original aesthetic, idiom, and technique and also because it commissions work from today’s leading choreographers. But there’s a special link with Los Angeles, dance, and Graham. It was there in California that Martha Graham—so wholly identified with New York—studied with Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn, the influential and essential pioneers of modern dance.

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New Album Released by Yo-Yo Ma's Silk Road Ensemble

Fifteen years ago, the cellist Yo-Yo Ma, who was already busy with a full and demanding career as a recitalist, a soloist with orchestras, and chamber music, launched the Silk Road Project, a music collective inspired by the cross-cultural exchange along the ancient Silk Road route. As befits an ensemble that performs music diverse in style and from varied musical traditions, the group includes Western classical instruments—violin, cello, double bass—but also features instruments from throughout the Mediterranean, the Middle East, South Asia, and China: Galician bagpipe; a kamancheh, a Persian fiddle; tabla or Indian drums; and the pipa, an ancient Chinese plucked string instrument, among others. The aim was to foster contemporary music, incorporating varied and established traditions, and that they have.

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New Visitor Center Debuts at Macy's Herald Square

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New York City and Macy’s Herald Square recently unveiled a new Visitor Center, housed inside the world's largest store.

Over the past two years, NYC visitor numbers have broken records, with 52 million in 2012. To help accomodate tourists, one of the city's most-visited (and shopped at) sights, Macy’s Herald Square, has stepped up with partner NYC & Company to unveil a revamped, user-friendly visitor center.

Flanked by curved staircases on either side, the white-tiled mezzanine sits above cosmetic brands like Chanel and Dior. Four touch-screen kiosks resembling giant iPhones allow visitors to plan their next move, with extensive attraction, dining, and nightlife listings. Nine languages are available—including Mandarin and Portuguese—while Google Maps provides step-by-step directions that can be printed on the spot. By Nov. 1st, you'll even be able to purchase attraction tickets (Empire State Building Observatory; Circle Line cruises) directly through the kiosks.

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New MoMA Exhibit Highlights Surrealist Painter, Magritte

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If you’re on the hunt for a thought-provoking dip into the Surreal, you can’t miss Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary exhibit at the MoMA (running through January 12, 2014). Curated by Anne Umland, the exhibit covers what the famed Belgian painter described as the most defining period of his career from 1926-1938.
 
The exhibit features many of his most acclaimed works including “Le Trahison Des Images” (pictured) wherein he notoriously paired his painting of a pipe with the beautifully scripted words “Ceci n’est pas une pipe” (“This is not a pipe”). After you absorb the whimsically provocative contradictions in his narrated paintings, check out “Les Amants” to peek at his popular portrait of two lovers kissing.

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Frieze and 1:54, World's First Contemporary African Art Fair, Open in London

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This week, the culturati makes its annual pilgrimage to Regent’s Park for the 11th Frieze London (Oct. 17-20), with pieces from 152 contemporary galleries from around the globe plus specially commissioned performances, pop-up restaurants, and let’s not forget the party scene. In an unprecedented partnership, British fashion house Alexander McQueen is a sponsor this time around; artworks curated by local gallerist Sadie Coles will be displayed at the brand’s London stores throughout the fair.

Of course, there’s also the second edition of Frieze Masters, the historically minded spin-off, and a full schedule of satellites. Among this year’s standouts, in collaboration with Tanzanian architect David Adjaye, Somerset House has unveiled 1:54 (through Oct. 20), the world's very first contemporary African art fair. Founded by Touria El Glaoui, daughter of Moroccan painter Hassan El Glaoui, it’s a platform for more than 70 artists—from DRC painter Chéri Samba (see La Vraie Carte du Monde, above) to Benin’s Romuald Hazoumé, with his colorful tribal-inspired “masks” made from discarded jerricans, and Gonçalo Mabunda, who turns AK47s and rocket launchers deactivated after Mozambique’s civil war into whimsical, Modernist thrones.

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Hot Tickets: Fall 2013 Museum News

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Thanks to dramatic transformations, these five world-class museums are casting a whole new light on their collections.

Amsterdam: After a 10-year renovation, a grand atrium now greets visitors to the Rijksmuseum (pictured). More than 8,000 objects, including masterpieces by Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Hals, have been rearranged as a historical survey. —Raul Barreneche

Honolulu: The extraordinary story of how Pacific Islanders developed their diverse cultures is told—with canoes, costumes, musical instruments, and more—in the renovated Pacific Hall, debuting this month at the Bishop Museum. —Peter Webster

New York City: Housed in a pavilion built for the 1939 World’s Fair, the Queens Museum reopens in November at twice its original size. One of the first shows, “The People’s UN,” nods to the building’s former role as host to the General Assembly.—Peter Webster

Mexico City: The Museo Jumex, displaying artists both Mexican (Gabriel Orozco; Carlos Amorales) and global (Olafur Eliasson; Tacita Dean), expands into David Chipperfield’s sawtooth-roofed building in November. —Raul Barreneche

Cleveland: Come December, the Cleveland Museum of Art will unveil the last of three wings by Rafael Viñoly, showing works that range from Chinese bronzes to Impressionist paintings. —Peter Webster

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Salem Witches Curse Shutdown

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While international tourists are shaking their collective fists at the closed gates of National Parks, another faction within the travel industry is grappling with the ugly effects of the government shutdown: witches, warlocks and their looky-loo friends in Salem, Mass.

After all, October is usually an extra-magical time of year for the hometown of the infamous 1692 witch trials. The month-long “Haunted Happenings,” which includes a psychic fair and witchcraft expo, conjures up about $30 million in revenue for the town, according to a recent AP article.

But here's the fly, or frog, in the ointment: Salem’s visitors center—the nerve center for the event—is run by the currently defunct National Park Service.

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