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Trip Planner: Cultural Savings in Europe

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Save a few euros on some of Europe’s best cultural offerings.

Berlin: The city (pictured above) celebrates its 775th anniversary this year with many free events: a history-themed festival transforms the Nikolai area into a medieval quarter; an open-air exhibition highlights the diversity of Berlin’s residents, past and present.

Vienna: Queue up at the Imperial Palace’s Hofburg Chapel Sunday mornings to hear the Vienna Boys’ Choir (standing room free). And in April, May, June, and September, the Vienna State Opera screens live performances on a giant LED screen in the opera house square.

Portugal: On the agenda for Guimarães, a UNESCO World Heritage site and one of this year’s European Capitals of Culture: performances from avant-garde theater troupe La Fura dels Baus, free to the public.

Photo by Lyndsey Matthews

"Cosmic Opera" Opens in New York

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As a Kabuki-dressed opera singer was convoyed atop a platform through the crowd wailing in an ear-piercing pitch, a packed Hammerstein Ballroom wrestled in anticipation. The mezzo-soprano’s Italian lyrics serenaded the audience over an original Stephan Moore composition before slipping into a familiar tune.

In my mind, in my head, this is where we all came from
The dreams we had, the love we shared, this is what we’re waiting for

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Lei it On Me: World’s Largest Flower Show Opens in Philly

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If you live outside the Sun Belt, chances are you’re ready for spring—for warmth, more daylight, and let’s face it, a little color thank you.  If you live in the Northeast, there’s a fix on the horizon: The Philadelphia International Flower Show, which opens at the city’s convention center this Sunday, March 4, and runs through March 11, 2012. And this year’s theme—Hawaii: Islands of Aloha—is a sure tonic for the winter-weary craving a dose of the tropics.

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Gaultier Exhibit Opens in Dallas

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It might come as a surprise to some that the first exhibition devoted to an appraisal of the career of Jean Paul Gaultier should take place in Dallas, but Dallas is a stylish town (the headquarters of Neiman Marcus) and one of only two U.S. venues for The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

The show, which just opened at the Dallas Museum of Art (through February 12; dma.org), presents 35 years of chic from the enfant terrible of Paris couture in an innovative—sometimes startling—display that includes 30 mannequins with animated faces and voices, including Gaultier himself, provided by audio-visual projection. Fashion comes alive!

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Opera Now: What to See This Season

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Last June, American contemporary-classical composer Nico Muhly, who is barely 30, electrified London audiences with the world premiere of his genre-busting opera Two Boys. That work, a disturbing detective story set in a world of sinister Internet chat rooms, comes to the Metropolitan Opera in 2013. But New York City is getting a chance to sample Muhly’s iconoclastic gifts, with his equally unconventional second opera, Dark Sisters, which currently has its premiere production by the Gotham Chamber Opera (through November 19). Dark Sisters moves next summer to the Opera Company of Philadelphia (June 8-18).

The new piece, which has a libretto by playwright Stephen Karam, follows one woman’s desperate attempts to escape from a polygamist Mormon sect. Fifty Nine Productions, the lighting and projections team responsible for integrating dramatic moving images into the Two Boys staging, creates images that range from stark landscapes of the American southwest to the re-creation of a sensational television news show, studio and telecast feed, side-by-side.

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T+L "Hearts" Jake Shimabukuro + NYC Concert Date


Recently, ukelele crossover star Jake Shimabukuro showed T+L around his hometown of Honolulu. Now, he lands on our turf to perform tracks from his latest album “Peace Love Ukelele” this Tuesday, November 15 at the Highline Ballroom in New York City. 212/414-5994. Don't miss his sweet rendition of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody."

Dead Sea Scrolls Exhibit Opens in New York City

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As the Dead Sea vies for a spot as one of the New7Wonders of Nature, the biggest archeological discovery it yielded has settled into a temporary new home. Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times premiered at New York’s Discovery Times Square on October 28—the same venue that has housed other historic exhibitions like Titanic and King Tut. It marks the most comprehensive collection of ancient artifacts from Israel ever organized in North America, including the oldest known copies of the Hebrew Bible and a scale recreation of part of the Western Wall. With a video feed broadcasting activity at Jerusalem’s iconic Temple Mount, it’s perhaps the closest experience to the religious pilgrimage as one can make without making the 5700+ mile journey.

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Postmodern Art and Pop Culture at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum

Homage to Levi-Strauss ziggurat dress

At London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, “Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970–1990” is a romp through two decades of excess and provocation—and the final installment in a series of seminal blockbuster shows that have included Art Deco, surrealism, and Modernism. The exhibition, curated by Glen Adamson and Jane Pavitt, is the first to cover the postmodern period in depth, tracing the movement’s origins as an architectural style to its influence on pop culture in art, film, graphics, fashion, and music. Expect to see bold colors and patterns, with ample servings of parody and irony. Among the 250 objects on display are the drawings for Philip Johnson’s AT&T building (1984) in New York City; a re-creation of Jenny Holzer’s illuminated billboard Protect Me from What I Want (1983–85); and stage costumes for Annie Lennox, Devo, and David Byrne (his big suit from the 1984 documentary Stop Making Sense). Exhibition surprise: a video room playing New Order’s 1986 single “Bizarre Love Triangle,” the epitome of the aesthetic overload of the eighties—and postmodernism (through Jan. 15, 2012).

Photo by V&A Images

Los Angeles Events: Pacific Standard Time

storage unit by Charles and Ray Eames at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Set your clocks. This fall the world shifts to “Pacific Standard Time,” the festival of exhibitions and performances highlighting southern California’s contribution to American postwar art and design. Involving more than 60 institutions, Pacific Standard Time gives a West Coast perspective to the period from the mid-1940’s to the 1980’s when the U.S. supplanted Europe as the center of the art universe. Highlights: “Crosscurrents in L.A. Paintings and Sculpture 1950–1970” (Oct. 1–Feb. 5, 2012), at the Getty Center, is a survey ranging from the sculpture of Billy Al Bengston and John McCracken to the conceptual Pop of Ed Ruscha and John Baldessari.

“Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980,” at the UCLA Hammer Museum (through Jan. 8, 2012), sheds new light on the dynamism of African-American expression in the turbulent 60’s and 70’s.

The Museum of Contemporary Art explores post-Vietnam political and social upheaval in works by Raymond Pettibon, Bruce Nauman, and others in “Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974–1981” (through Feb. 13, 2012).

“California Design, 1930–1965: Living in a Modern Way” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (through Mar. 25, 2012) includes furniture and decorative objects that epitomize California style.

Photo © 2011 Museum Associates/LACMA

A Meeting of the (Green) Minds at T+L's First Global Vision Awards Luncheon

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In our November issue, which just hit newsstands, you’ll find our seventh annual Global Vision Awards, which recognize the new leaders in responsible travel. This year, our winners included everything from Misool Eco Resort, a visionary property that’s responsible for setting up the first shark and ray sanctuary in Indonesia, to Rancho La Puerta, a luxury spa in Baja, Mexico that’s championing ecological restoration and education in the local community. In their own unique ways, these progressive thinkers represent the travel community’s best, most innovative solutions to some of the world’s most vexing problems: climate change, environmental degradation, cultural erosion, and economic inequality.

Last Friday, we invited our jurors and winners to New York City for our first-ever Global Vision Awards luncheon and round-table discussion, which took place at The Lambs Club in midtown’s Chatwal Hotel. Read on to see how the conversation unfolded.

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