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Q&A with Amsterdam's Hester van Eeghen

Amsterdam's Hester Van Eeghen bag

This Dutch designer has become a cult favorite thanks to her brightly colored leather bags, wallets, and shoes. Here, the plugged-in local shares her top hometown picks.

Q: Favorite restaurant?
A:
Proef (12 Gosschalklaan; 31-20/682-2656; dinner for two $120), a small, no-nonsense restaurant that’s organic and fresh, both in its menu and its urban-farmhouse-style décor. Try the beet ravioli. Book ahead.

Q: Must-visit jewelry store?
A: BLGK Goldsmiths
(28 Hartenstraat; 31-20/624-8154) carries metal jewelry that honors the natural shape of gemstones; I’m inspired by the window display alone.

Q: Top cultural spot?
A:
The Museum of Bags & Purses (573 Herengracht; 31-20/524-6452) has a collection of 4,000-plus pieces that offers a fascinating historical overview of my favorite accessory.

Q: Best mode of transportation?
A:
My husband and I bike everywhere. I love the bicycles from Vanmoof; they’re lightweight and rust-resistant, and have a built-in lock. You can rent them at Cyclelution (258 Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal; 31-65/363-1973; $10 for two hours).

Photo courtesy of hveus.com

Musician (and World Traveler) Morley Debuts New Album

A Jamaica, Queens native, singer-songwriter Morley makes music that is global, to say the least. Her latest album, Undivided (due out today, April 3rd), was recorded hot off the heels of a year of travel and takes cues from the music of the Sahara and Morocco. Morley’s brand of internationally influenced pop has been pegged by some as the missing link between Sade and Joni Mitchell, touting love and tolerance to hip-hop beats and acoustic guitar. And well, we love it.

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Reopening Art Gallery: The Palais de Tokyo in Paris

Palais de Tokyo artwork

When the Palais de Tokyo reopens this month, three times bigger than before, the self-described “anti-museum par excellence” will be one of Europe’s largest contemporary art spaces. The inaugural Triennale exhibition (April 20–Aug. 26) features works by a global range of talents, including Ghanaian sculptor El Anatsui and New York–based Rirkrit Tiravanija.

Roar, K, a papier-mâché mask by South Korean artist Seulgi Lee, on view at the Palais de Tokyo.

Mask by Seulgi Lee, Photo by Aurèlien Mole / Courtesy of Palais de Tokyo

A Local’s Guide to Hamburg, Germany

Hamburg, Germany

David Einsiedler, shop owner, and his dog Laban
“I own a vintage furniture store called Ply, so I’m a bit design-obsessed. Tide is a small, beautiful café lined with driftwood from the North Sea; I also go to the modern Klippkroog for regional food like Rollbraten (rolled roast).”

Nadira Nasser, costume designer
“Speicherstadt, the old warehouse district, is filled with museums now. At Miniatur Wunderland, the ‘chocolate factory’ exhibit actually produces a tiny piece of Swiss chocolate for you while you wait.”

Andrea Schneider (pictured), book cover designer
“HafenCity is the next great neighborhood, with many new buildings, including the concert hall Elbphilharmonie, scheduled to open in 2014. It’s right on the river Elbe; I like to watch the container ships coming in and out.”

Kevin Reschka, operations manager of an automotive company
“Sometimes after basketball we go to 3 Freunde for their inventive cocktails. My favorite is the Filmriss Deluxe, with vodka, vanilla liqueur, sparkling wine, passion fruit, and lime.”

Photo by Christian Kerber

Ludovic Morlot talks Seattle Symphony

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French conductor Ludovic Morlot's appointment as music director of the Seattle Symphony is one of the most exciting in the world of classical music. The 38-year-old Morlot has ideas—lots of them—from expanding repertoire to building 21st audiences for live music.  He talks with T+L in this, his first season in Seattle, which began in fall 2011 and included throwing out the first pitch at a Seattle Mariners baseball game. (For more on Seattle, see "Seattle State of Mind" by Gary Shteyngart in the March 2011 issue of Travel + Leisure).

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Savannah's New SCAD Museum of Art

SCAD Museum of Art

With its annual film festival and steady influx of visiting talent, the Savannah College of Art and Design has helped turn the genteel port town into a creative magnet. The institution’s latest achievement: the cutting-edge $26 million addition to the SCAD Museum of Art (601 Turner Blvd.; 912/525-7191). The design of the gleaming steel-and-glass space—housed in a restored railway depot—was led by SCAD alumnus and dean Christian Sottile, and former Vogue editor-at-large (and university trustee) André Leon Talley lends his expertise, curating shows for his namesake gallery. Currently on view (through June 17) is "Life's Link," showcasing works by conceptual artist Fred Wilson.

Photo by Bran Rankin/Courtesy of SCAD. “Portrait of Lady Elizabeth Strickland” by Sir Peter Lely/Courtesy of SCAD Museum of Art Permanent Collection

Composer Mason Bates talks Mass Transmission

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The San Francisco Symphony, with Michael Tilson Thomas its music director, has been celebrating its centennial throughout the 2011-12 season in a special, generous, and, for music-lovers, innovative fashion: first, it invited six of the leading U.S. orchestras to perform before San Francisco audiences, and, now this week (March 27-30) in New York's Carnegie Hall, the SFS brings a festival entitled American Mavericks, which features the music of pioneers of the ever evolving American sound from the 20th and young 21st century: Charles Ives to Meredith Monk, Aaron Copland to Steve Reich, Aaron Copland to John Adams.  Among four premieres is Mass Transmission by 35-year-old composer Mason Bates. T+L talks with Bates about the score, which features electronics, the sonic possibilities of which he has become expert, both as a composer and as DJ Masonic, his alter-ego. See the interview after the jump.

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Trend Alert: Spain's "Walking Gallery"

Spain's Walking Gallery: grandma

It’s an idyllic summer day along the Mediterranean Sea. You’ve nestled in your slice of earthly heaven, a small, sunny patch of sand, when a giant portrait of a cranky-looking grandma rises from the water and lurches toward you.

Is this a flash mob? An international episode of the U.S. hidden camera series: What Would You Do? What in the hell is going on?

It’s Spain’s Walking Gallery, where artists march around a city for several hours with their creations strapped to their bodies or hanging from handlebars.

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On Our Radar: Savannah Music Festival

Savannah music Savannah is one of those mysterious places that I imagined coming to life in the dusty pages of antiquarian books. Other than what I saw in Clint Eastwood’s colorful depiction of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil and some Civil War trivia, I didn’t know much about it. So when the opportunity arose to check out a new music festival, Savannah Stopover, I jumped at the chance to experience the Southern legend firsthand.

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Brits Abuzz Over British Airways Pop-Up

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It’s pop-up galore these days, but this one caught our eye: From Apr. 4–17, British Airways will host FlightBA2012 in Shoreditch. The event is a culmination of last year’s airline-sponsored search to find three “Great Britons,” rising stars from different creative fields. Their mentors? Celeb chef Heston Blumenthal, YBA Tracey Emin, and actor/writer/director Richard E. Grant.

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