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Arts and Ideas Flood New Haven at International Festival

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If you're looking for a quick family outing from Boston or New York between now and June 30th, hop a train to New Haven, Connecticut, and visit the International Festival of Arts and Ideas.

The two-week festival, which brought in $20 million, and more than 100,000 visitors last year, has a diverse program of concerts, dance performances, plays, art installations and culinary tours this year, taking place at more than two dozen venues around the city. Eighty percent of the festival events are free.

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Video: GloboMaestro Hits the New-York Historical Society

Exclusive GloboMaestro Video: Say hello to the new New-York Historical Society. For years New York City's oldest museum was perhaps best known for the placement of a hyphen between "New" and "York" in its title (a common usage during the museum’s founding in 1804). While steadfastly holding on to its own history, the New-York Historical Society has transformed into a cultural powerhouse thanks to a recent three-year $70 million renovation. Exhibitions are enhanced by shrewd uses of new technologies, from touch-screens to state-of-the-art video projections. Paintings, photographs, maps, and documents have never looked more attractive. It'll make you fall in love all over again with Gotham.

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Briana Fasone is an editorial assistant at Travel + Leisure.




Video courtesy of GloboMaestro
, the only web series where hotel concierges dish their insider destination tips.

Franc Art: Cash and Creativity at Basel 43

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At last count, there were 189 international art fairs, enough to keep the affluent and avant-garde in champagne and envy 365 days a year. But on the heels of Documenta and at the apex of the spring fairathon that started with Frieze NY back in early May, Swiss mothership Art Basel—which had its 43rd outing last week—is still the biggest, the brightest, the only fair the art crowd literally can’t afford to miss: last year, Gagosian sold $45 million-worth in the first 45 minutes alone, and, at last Wednesday's VIP preview, someone with a good eye and an even better balance-sheet snagged a Gerhard Richter for north of $20 million—a price-point generally reserved for auction houses.

That's because Art Basel is special: where its Miami Beach iteration has a “Woodstock for the Wealthy” vibe and Documenta is cloaked in anti-commercial intellectualism, Basel distinguishes itself as a serious forum for the exchange of ideas and cash. Which is why, over the weekend, 65,000 art-lovers rendez-vous'ed on the banks of the Rhine.

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Doc on Chinese Activist-Artist Opens Human Rights Watch Film Festival in NYC

The 23rd annual Human Rights Watch Film Festival kicked off Friday night with the New York premiere of journalist and first-time director Alison Klayman’s documentary Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry. Intriguing as much as it is troubling, the film—which won audiences over at Sundance this year—looks at the life of the artist and political activist who pushes China to grapple with its own social and political shortcomings, and challenges the government’s capricious, heavy-handed approach to silencing political dissent.

For the next two weeks Lincoln Center’s Walter Reade Theater will be festival HQ, hosting a series of new films (14 New York debuts), panel discussions with experts and filmmakers, and an exhibition by South African photographer Brent Stirton, which investigates rights abuses committed against residents living near Papua New Guinea’s Porgera gold mine.

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Gold Fever: London Debuts Once-in-a-Lifetime Exhibit

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There may be few places as exciting as London this summer.  First, there is that small, international sports event known as the Olympics, starting in late July.  Second, the London 2012 Festival, an olympiad of arts and culture of unprecedented scale—more than 25,000 artists from all 204 competing Olympic nations participating in 12,000 events and performances throughout the UK—spans the period June 21 to September 9 and involves the widest range of music, theater, dance, art, film, and then some. 

And while the Queen's jubilee year hovers over all these proceedings like a benevolent as well as royal presence, perhaps the most spectacular show in town is at the Goldsmith's Hall, a magnificent, neoclassical palazzo, northeast of St. Paul's Cathedral, where "Gold: Power and Allure, 4,500 Years of Gold Treasures from Across Britain" (through July 28) offers visitors a dazzling opportunity to consider the beauty and this most fabled, precious metal.

David Lamb, the managing director of the World Gold Council, gives T+L an overview of the splendid display:

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France Kicks Off WWI Centennial with Picasso at the Pompidou

Centre Pompidou Metz: Picasso

The Centre Pompidou Metz is marking the centennial of WWI with “1917,” a new exhibition running through September 24. It’s the kickoff event in a series of international commemorations of the Great War and will feature Picasso’s largest work (pictured), a 33-foot-by-33-foot canvas stage curtain made for the controversial ballet “Parade.” Don’t miss Chagall, Rodin, Klee, and the two hundred other artists represented in this highly anticipated retrospective.

Tina Isaac is Travel + Leisure’s Paris correspondent.

Photo by Alamy

Video: GloboMaestro Goes to The Paris Theatre

Exclusive GloboMaestro Video: Few cinemas are as iconic as the films they show, but The Paris Theatre, America's oldest continuously operated art-house cinema, is itself a celebrity. The cinema, located just a stone's throw away from The Plaza Hotel, was opened by Marlene Dietrich in 1948 and remains one of the New York's last single screen theaters. You won't catch this summer's blockbuster here (the theater shows only movies shot on film), but you'll be sure to see some of the finest independent and foreign films. While only one flick is shown each week, this cinephile wonderland never ever plays any pre-show ads.

Video courtesy of GloboMaestro, the only web series where hotel concierges dish their insider destination tips.

 

Crowdsourcing: What to Do When You're Near the Ritz London

Ritz London

We asked true travel pros what to do near The Ritz London, Piccadilly's grande dame for over a century. Want to share your expertise? Join our community on Facebook at facebook.com/travelandleisure and at Twitter @TravlandLeisure.

Zara Home’s (129 Regent St.) pretty and affordable bed linens are a must-buy. I’m anxiously hoping they’ll open in the U.S.” —Carolyn Ernst, via Facebook

“You’ll find free choral recitals (and an amazing flea market on Tuesdays) at St. James’s Church (197 Piccadilly).” —Sunshine Flint, via Facebook

The Only Running Footman, near Berkeley Square, is my favorite pub for people-watching—it’s packed with locals after work.” —Georgia Aarons, via Facebook

“I recommend the Wolseley for great cream teas, and the deck chairs in Green Park on a sunny day.” —Zoe Bramley, via Facebook

“Check out Paxton & Whitfield (93 Jermyn St.); they’ve sold crave-worthy cheeses since 1742.” —@tammypeters

Fakhreldine (85 Piccadilly) is the place for high-end Lebanese food and an iconic park view.” —Julie Brennan, via Facebook

Photo courtesy of The Ritz London

The 78 Project: Time Travel at 78 RPM

If the Alan Lomax collection had a time travel section, that’s where you’d find the 78 Project. Rather than just observing and preserving present-day culture, the project combines technology and traditions from the past with modern musicians—an active exploration of antiquity that’s more mad scientist than history professor.

Filmmaker Alex Steyermark and Lavinia Jones Wright (with the support of executive producer Erik Nelson) created the project, and serve as its field recording team, but the PRESTO recorder—a later model of the device that Lomax used for his Library of Congress recordings in the ‘30s—is the one who’s really in charge.

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New York City's Hopping Beer Scene

Top Hops Beer Shop

With Beer Here: Brewing New York’s History opening May 25 at the recently renovated New-York Historical Society (in which you’ll learn that home-brewing has been around in New York City since the 17th century), now is the perfect time to check out some of the city’s newest brew-centric spots.

Top Hops Beer Shop (pictured): A former distributor for Anheuser-Busch/In Bev, owner Ted Kenny is the mastermind behind this Lower East Side beer emporium. The 700- bottle selection fills refrigerators in the back, while the custom wood-and-polished aluminum bar up front offers 20 beers on tap (tip: order a flight). The menu is limited, so don’t come hungry—just really thirsty. 94 Orchard St.; 212-254-4677.

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