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Spring 2013 Arts Calendar Highlights

spring performing arts

Coming attractions on the arts calendar: reinvigorated classics and celebrated traditions. Here, some of the highlights.

New York City: The two-month-long Season of Cambodia festival is a collaboration between the Phnom Penh–based nonprofit Cambodian Living Arts (a T+L Global Vision Award winner) and dozens of cultural institutions citywide. Dancers, sculptors, puppeteers, and others will showcase Khmer heritage, both traditional (Royal Ballet of Cambodia) and contemporary (rock band Dengue Fever). April 9–May 25.

Amsterdam: It’s an artistic double Dutch: both the Rijksmuseum and the Van Gogh Museum reopen this spring after major makeovers. The former, closed for 10 years, has added an Asian pavilion; Rembrandt’s Night Watch now takes pride of place among Vermeer’s pensive maidens and Yves Saint Laurent’s Mondrian dress. At the latter, van Gogh’s sunflowers and self-portraits come home again to Gerrit Rietveld’s Modernist building.

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Hip New Guidebook: Wildsam Field Guides

Wildsam Field Guide

The quirky new Wildsam Field Guide series will help put a decidedly hip spin on your next trip. There’s nary a photo; instead, you might find a personal essay by Rosanne Cash or an interview with a local letterpress printer (both in the Nashville edition). Hand-illustrated maps are organized by theme—adventure, music, history, food—and the “Bests” section is hyper-focused: one museum, one yoga studio. As creator Taylor Bruce puts it, “I don’t want three places to get a burger. I just want to know the favorite.” The Austin, Texas, edition is out this month—just in time for SXSW—to be followed soon by San Francisco, New Orleans, Seattle, and, of course, Brooklyn. $16.95 each.

Brooke Porter
Brooke Porter is an associate editor at Travel + Leisure.

 

Photo by John Lawton

4 Great Independent Bookstores

Coolest Bookstores: Lello

As transporting as any museum and nourishing as any local dish, these independent bookstores unlock the soul of a place.

Lello Bookshop (pictured), Porto, Portugal
The elaborate neo-Gothic façade of this former library barely hints at the opulence inside: carved wood, gilded pillars, ornamented ceilings, and a gorgeous red staircase lit by a stained-glass atrium. Its polyglot collection includes English translations of Portuguese lions Fernando Pessoa and José Saramago.

Heywood Hill, London
Creaky floorboards and stacks of new and old literature, history, gardening, and travel tomes lend the 77-year-old Mayfair landmark the air of a well-loved private library. Smartly dressed booksellers eagerly provide recommendations for patrons, who include Her Majesty the Queen.

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Travel Uniform: Thelma Golden

201303-b-thelma-goldenjpg

For the style-setting director of the Studio Museum in Harlem, packing is high art.

“My clothes reflect my passion for beautiful things,” says Thelma Golden, the director and chief curator of New York’s Studio Museum in Harlem and one of the most powerful women in the art world. Golden racks up frequent-flier miles visiting her London-based husband, designer Duro Olowu, and attending exhibitions in such far-flung destinations as Morocco and Senegal. She always packs camisoles and tights from Uniqlo’s Heattech line (from $13); black Minnie pants from J. Crew (from $90); and a careful curation of shoes. How many? “That’s complicated. Let’s just say as many as possible.”

• On view at the Studio Museum through March 10: Harlem Postcards, images from the storied neighborhood.

• “This coat is from my husband’s collaboration with JC Penney ($75).

• Flats, like these from Roger Vivier ($625), are a must. “We’ve all had three-mile hikes in airports.”

• The Large Metro tote from MZ Wallace ($195) is “even bigger than it looks, and has a fabulous shape.”

Photo by Jake Chessum

Q+A: Gael Garcia Bernal on Chile and Mexico

Gael Garcia Bernal

For his Academy Award-nominated film No, the Mexican star traveled to Santiago, Chile, to portray the young ad exec who helped oust General Augusto Pinochet in 1988. T+L caught up with the peripatetic actor.

Q: What stood out most about Chile?
A: It’s the only country where a dictator has been toppled democratically. A fantastic place to visit is the General Cemetery; the whole history is buried there and you can see how the classes are divided. And Chile faces the sea, so there’s a strong coastal culture.

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Trip Doctor: Istanbul's Best Walking Tours

Istanbul Walking Tours

Culinary Backstreets–Istanbul Eats: Go off the beaten path to under-the-radar restaurants, bakeries, and candy shops. From $125.

Sea Song: Itineraries from Sea Song, which has custom tours in 17 Turkish destinations, are crafted around themes—food; archaeology; sacred places; artisan traditions—and include unique experiences such as lunch at a historic Ottoman house. From $150.

Amy Send your dilemmas to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @afarles on Twitter.


Photo by Richard T. Nowitz/CORBIS

Crowdsourcing: What to Do When You're on the Las Vegas Strip

We asked true travel pros what to do near the Las Vegas Strip. Want to share your expertise? Join our community on Facebook at facebook.com/travelandleisure and at Twitter @TravlandLeisure.


View Las Vegas Strip in a larger map

“For a great view of the Bellagio fountains (and wonderful crêpes), stop by the Sugar Factory (3655 Las Vegas Blvd. S.).” —Michelle Nolan, via Facebook

“Don’t miss the olive-oil ice cream with grapefruit at José Andrés’s Jaleo, in the Cosmopolitan.” —Bhadri Kubendran, via Facebook

“Take a relaxing break from the Strip at the Mandarin Oriental.” @lassers

“The best people-watching is in the Crystals shopping arcade at City Center.” —Alex Walters, via Facebook

“Bundle up and hit the Minus 5 Ice Lounge (3770 Las Vegas Blvd. S.) at Monte Carlo—you drink out of ice glasses!” —Irina Adler, via Facebook

Public House (3355 Las Vegas Blvd. S.) is a new gastropub with an impressive selection of beers.” —Erin de Santiago-Domue, via Facebook

Georgia Lures Tourists with Zombies

Zombies

Southern belles and the Duke boys? So 20th century. Georgia is hoping to lure visitors with a different kind of Deep South character: zombies.

In its new guidebook, the state tourism board is touting the town of Senoia, a miniature, sweet-tea-soaked Hollywood: it has been the filming site for Fried Green Tomatoes, Driving Miss Daisy, Sweet Home Alabama and, as we write, the AMC television series The Walking Dead. The town, about a half hour from Atlanta, has apparently played the part of Woodbury, which in the series is home to survivors of a zombie apocalypse.

While the studios in Senoia are not open to the public, we can’t deny that you might see some plain-clothes zombies tooling around the town of 3,300, which also boasts some charming-looking B&Bs and The Buggy Shop Museum. Given the show’s popularity, could zombie-phile shops and cafés be on the horizon for downtown Senoia? Would Miss Daisy approve?

Photo: © Mike Kemp/In Pictures/Corbis

Grand Central Celebrates 100th Birthday

201301-a-grandcentral-lmjpg

On February 1, 1913 Grand Central’s stationmaster received the first set of keys to the Terminal. One-hundred years later, New York will celebrate the beloved landmark (and one of the world's most beautiful train stations) with a full day of activities including a rededication ceremony in the morning and the opening of “Grand by Design,” a multimedia exhibit of the terminal’s history by the New York Transit Museum that runs through March 15, 2013.


Lyndsey Matthews is an assistant digital editor at Travel + Leisure

Photo by Lyndsey Matthews

Free Online Photography Museum

Stieglitz

Arago is a new, free-access portal to all of the photography archives in France. At launch, the site included the collections of the Direction General des Patrimoines and public establishments under the Ministry of Culture–30,000 representative images from about 20 institutions. Arago will gradually expand to incorporate private collections as well as other public ones. The site is named after French politician and astronomer François Arago, who presented the Daguerrotype process to the Academie des Sciences in 1839, ensuring photography would be France’s gift to the world. Go on, browse—and be transported.

Tina Isaac is a contributor to TravelandLeisure.com.

Photo of Georgia O'Keeffe (1887–1986) by Alfred Stieglitz

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