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"It's So Miami": Why the Florida City's New Slogan May Mean More Than City Officials Intended

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With a spritely klatch of scantily-clad models flying around a pop-up pool party, slapping around beach balls and cavorting to a live deejay's techno music, Florida’s most hyperactive playground kicked off a fitting new tourism campaign, “It’s So Miami,” on a recent balmy afternoon in New York City’s Union Square. The slogan is clearly more about reinforcing the Latin-infused city’s authority as America’s preeminent destination for escapism than proffering anything newfangled or undiscovered. But the irony of Miami’s decision to double down on its hedonistic caricature is that the city truly is emerging as a genuine cultural hub with gravitas and depth.

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Rock Bund: Shanghai’s Hot New Neighborhood

Shanghai neighborhoods

Shanghai urban planners rival their New York real estate agents in their imaginative renaming of neighborhoods. Some have been flops: Sinan Mansions and the South Bund are still largely deserted, the latter despite the industrial-chic Waterhouse and a solid restaurant by Jason Atherton. I’m now hearing that the area around the Rockbund Art Museumis shaping up to be an emerging ‘hood. (It’s called, rather unimaginatively, Rock Bund.)

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Mozart Takes Wing at New York’s Lincoln Center

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Mostly Mozart, the 46-year-old summer festival at New York City’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, is in full swing and more vibrant than ever.  Significantly, this year’s edition marks the tenth anniversary season of French conductor Louis Langrée as music director who, along with Jane Moss, artistic director, has been responsible for revitalizing Mostly Mozart, in particular, its heartbeat, the festival orchestra. He's credited with raising its playing standards and adding inventive programming that features soloists, both established and debut artists, period instrument bands, and contemporary music ensembles.

Year to year, the mix may include dance, sound installations, film, video.  This year, Mostly Mozart takes up the theme of birds, “the originators of song and an inspiration for countless composers,” according to Moss, as a point of departure for a range of programming.  Indeed, in the age of twitter, birdsong may never sound as pure.  T+L spoke with Louis Langrée earlier in the season during a stopover in New York en route to Paris about Mostly Mozart, a conductor’s role, American audiences, and why the festival remains popular with travelers and New Yorkers alike.

Q: What are your thoughts on your 10th anniversary? 

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Travel + Leisure Global Bazaar Launches New Store

The Travel + Leisure Global Bazaar is still weeks away—so there’s plenty of time to buy those tickets! But for those who just can’t wait to get a taste of the world, you’re in luck. We just opened the online T+L Global Bazaar Store, powered by L-atitude. Stocked with tons of accessories from around the world, it’s a dreamy shopping experience for any seasoned traveler.

What can you expect to find in the store? Items similar to those that you’ll find at the actually event next month—from one-of-a-kind woven pillows to Turkish and Indian jewelry to Mexican beach bags. So pop on in, browse around, and bring a little piece of the world into your home. Happy shopping!

The Travel + Leisure Global Bazaar takes place September 28–30, in NYC's Lexington Armory. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.

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Joshua Pramis is the social media editor and resident tech aficionado at Travel + Leisure. Follow him on Twitter: @joshuapramis

Which Keeps You Drier in the Rain, Walking or Running?

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Walking umbrella-free in the rain may be romantic when the temperature is warm and you’re not headed to a job interview or fancy restaurant. But how should you respond if you’re caught in a shower and want to stay as dry as possible?  Common sense may tell you to run, but how can you be absolutely sure?

The BBC (bless them) dumbs down an article from the European Journal of Physics about whether or not to run in a downpour. The physicist who conducted a recent study, Dr. Franco Bocci, concludes that running as fast as you can is best in most situations. 

However, it gets complicated if you want to be exacting, as physicists often do.

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Photographer Ahae Adds to South Korea's Cultural Revolution

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Actually—and without even mentioning the established international success of the Lee Ufans and Nam June Paiks of the world—it’s been a banner few weeks for art in South Korea: First this guy assembled a functional satellite, for the equivalent of $500, basically in his basement, and will be launching it into space in the name of Achieving One’s Artistic Dreams. Then underground hip-hop artist PSY released what is, seriously, the best summer video. Ever. Now, septuagenarian businessman-turned-amateur-photographer Ahae is doing his bit for the Land of the Morning Calm. Having previously soothed viewers in New York, London, and Prague, his one-man show, Through My Window, has alighted in a purpose-built pavilion in the Tuileries Gardens, adjacent to the Louvre—the first such structure ever allowed there—where it will be on view through August 26th.

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Families Flock to the Seattle Great Wheel

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Consider it Seattle's equivalent of the London Eye. Nearly three times shorter than the legendary 605-foot Seattle Space Needle, the city's newest landmark, the Seattle Great Wheel, delivers panoramic views of the Emerald City that will lift you—and your family—off your feet. 

Located on Pier 57, its 42 climate-controlled gondolas offer a 15-20 minute spin on the waterfront. Each gondola rotates three times, and can accommodate up to six adults or eight children. 

The $20 million attraction is the brainchild of Seattle entrepreneur Hal Griffith who, for more than 30 years, has envisioned a Seattle Ferris wheel.  The attraction is also a part of the efforts to improve Seattle’s waterfront, which includes replacing the Alaskan Way Viaduct with an underground tunnel. 

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75 Years of Tanglewood In Your Ear

201208-b-leonard-bernstein-tanglewoodjpgAs part of its 75th anniversary season, Tanglewood, the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra located in Western Massachusetts, is celebrating in grand and generous style by offering an extraordinary gift to listeners: the Tanglewood festival and the BSO is presenting 75 free digital streams of performances from a storied 75-year history and unique audio archive.  One stream is offered each day of the season (through September 2) at Tanglewood.org.  The daily gratis performance is available starting at 8 a.m. EST for 24 hours; after the stream has ended, listeners can purchase it as a download.  What’s more, you can listen at a desktop computer, through a home music system, or mobile device—all you need is internet access.

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Escape the Crowds: 4 Great Sidetrips from London

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If you’ve taken the plunge in London for the Olympics and are thinking you might need a quick break from all the festivities (or are just looking for an easy getaway from England’s largest city), Black Tomato’s Tom Marchant has four fantastic 48-hour European getaways that will leave you rejuvenated and ready to re-join the party on your return.

Venice
The romance, the glamour… the paddling? The water-based city is full of majestic cathedrals, beautiful squares, culture, carnivals and top-notch cuisine. A private kayaking tour is a great way to really experience the canals—the arteries of the city. Flights from London are very frequent and no more than 2 hours, making it an ideal weekend break.

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China Invades the Northeast: 5 Not-to-Miss Exhibits

Then & Now: Photographs of Northern China

In 1908-9, art collector and explorer, Sterling Clark, and naturalist, Arthur deCarle Sowerby, spent 17 months caravanning across Northern China. With a team of scientists and specialists, the explorers were on a mission to collect artifacts and biological material from a territory that until then remained a blank spot for scientific inquiry on the world map. The rich findings of their odyssey have given rise to three exhibitions at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and one at the Explorers Club in New York City

Through Shên-Kan: Sterling Clark in China (until Sept. 16), documents the crossing through China–preserved animals discovered during the trek, photographs, equipment, and paperwork from the journey are on loan from the Smithsonian and gathered from the Clark’s own collection—much of which have never before been seen by the public.

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