/
Close
Newsletters  | Mobile

RSS Feed Arts + Culture

British Composer Thomas Adès Takes New York by Storm

201210-b-hd-tempest-1jpg

One of the most highly anticipated events of the New York cultural season—The Tempest by British composer Thomas Adès—blows onto the stage of the Metropolitan Opera this week.  The work, based on the Shakespeare play about betrayal, retribution, and the redeeming power of love, had its premiere in 2004 at London’s Royal Opera House and garnered for the 32-year-old Adès critical acclaim and popular success. Since then, the contemporary work has made a strong bid for a place in the operatic repertoire, and after productions in Germany and the American premiere by the Santa Fe OperaThe Tempest arrives in New York, in a staging by Robert Lepage.

Read More

Dogpatch: San Francisco's Newest Creative Neighborhood

Dogpatch, San Francisco

Take a vibrant mix of Victorians and historic warehouses. Fill them with inventive boutiques and restaurants. Add an industrial waterfront district—and you’ve got San Francisco’s newest creative epicenter.

Yellow Building

The area’s beating heart is an 1890’s stable that now houses Piccino ($$)—a convivial restaurant dedicated to thin-crust pizzas and small plates—as well as an outpost of Modern Appealing Clothing, known for avant-garde fashions, and Dig, a wine shop and bar. Minnesota and 22nd Sts.

Workshop Residence

Head here for goods crafted by hand on-site, including silk crepe dresses from Paris-based designer Aurore Thibout and wood-and-leather wedges from local artisan Martha Davis. 833 22nd St.

Chocolate Lab

Cult brand Recchiuti Confections’ long-awaited café serves rich desserts such as mandarin-chocolate-mousse cake and lime-meringue tartlets. A few doors down is Little Nib, their new retail shop. 801 22nd St.

Read More

Costume Retrospective Opens at London's V&A

201206-b-hd-hollywood-costume-exhibit-kate-winslet-titanicjpg
Calling all (fashion-loving) cinaphiles: the most iconic outfits in film history are on display at The V&A’s autumn exhibition, “Hollywood Costume” (October 20, 2012 to January 27, 2013). Exploring the central role costume design plays in storytelling, the retrospective brings together clothes worn by unforgettable characters, from Indiana Jones and Jack Sparrow to Scarlett O’Hara and Holly Golightly.

Photo by 20th Century Fox / Paramount / The Kobal Collection

NYC Hoedown: American Ballet Theatre Celebrates "Rodeo"

apng

When American Ballet Theatre revives this week at New York City Center its production of Rodeo, it celebrates the 70th anniversary of a milestone: the first truly American ballet, with an evocative score by Aaron Copland, painterly sets by Oliver Smith, and the groundbreaking choreography of Agnes de Mille. De Mille’s dance combined classical ballet with Broadway and popular styles, including square dance, pantomime (cowboys ride imaginary horses and rope cattle), and an exuberant tap dance solo.

Tap dance in ballet?  In this Western love story, where a cowgirl falls in love with a champion roper who dazzles with a tap tour de force—de Mille’s novel use of tap dance was and remains a showstopper.  And in a lead up to the ABT’s performances of the landmark Rodeo, ABT dancers, including Craig Salstein, who performs the role of the champion roper, gave tap dance lessons to 100 New York City public school children at South Street Seaport.

Read More

Frieze Art Fair Opens in London

201210-b-frieze-london-2012jpg
In London this weekend? Don't miss the 10th annual Frieze Art Fair (Oct. 11 - 14), in Regent’s Park. With 170 participating contemporary art galleries from 34 countries (not to mention the splashy May launch of a sister fair in New York), this is its most international year yet. One major highlight: the inaugural Frieze Masters, a sort of fair-within-a-fair exhibiting works that date back to ancient times—an unprecedented move for Frieze, which has to date focused solely on living artists. Set on Gloucester Green in a temporary structure designed by New York–based architect Annabelle Selldorf with transparent walls and silver birch trees, it's all about old meeting new.

—Christine Ajudua is Travel + Leisure's London correspondent.

Credit: Gaetano Gandolfi (Bologna 1734 -1802 Bologna); Venus ordering armour for Aeneas at Vulcan's forge

Secrets of New York City's Chelsea Galleries

Leonardo Drew Chelsea gallery

We recently took a spellbinding 90-minute tour of Chelsea with David Behringer, founder of The Two Percent Gallery Tours (917/727-7687; $200 with a private group of three or less). The focus was his five favorite exhibitions—a godsend for art-world rookies—but also included some little-known facts about the area (for example: did you know 19th-street is filled with starchitecture by everyone from Frank Gehry to Jean Nouvel? And that the Oreo cookie was born in Chelsea market in 1912?). For more Behringer's favorite gallery stops, check out this Weekend Getaway. Here are some of the gallery highlights:

Read More

Pacific Northwest in Time-Lapse

I’m a sucker for time-lapse photography. I’m also a sucker for the Pacific Northwest. Combine the two and you have this mesmerizing work—some 260,000 stitched-together pics—from Portland-based photographer John Eklund, who was kind enough to let us share it.

Rich Beattie is the executive digital editor at Travel + Leisure.

Fashion Documentary Shows the World as a Runway

When Diana Vreeland was making her first forays into her career as a fashion editor, she wrote her dear readers the now oft-quoted suggestion, “Why don't you paint a map of the world on all four walls of your boys' nursery so they won't grow up with a provincial point of view?” All things considered, this was one of her more realistic tips, as compared to her enquiring why we don’t wear violet velvet mittens with everything or rinse our children’s hair in dead champagne.

In “Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel,” a fashion documentary in theaters today, Sept. 21, Ms. Vreeland’s ascendance from middle-school dropout to the most iconic fashion editor to date is largely attributed to her extravagant global vision. Never one to be confined, Ms. Vreeland saw no reason not to use the world as a catwalk and spearheaded legendary shoots, such as the 26-page spread of a fur-swaddled Veruschka scaling the mountains of Japan with a seven foot tall sumo wrestler. No one reads magazines just to see their own backyard, so why not blast them with images of France? Egypt? Or—her personal favorite—Russia?

Read More

Paris Cabaret Opens in London

Paris’s oldest cabaret is popping up in London this fall, performing Forever Crazy within a purpose-built venue on South Bank, behind the National Theatre, between September 18 (it kicks off during Fashion Week—the dancers’ shoes are custom-designed by Christian Louboutin) and December 16.

NYC’s New Park Concept: Underground

First there was the High Line, an elevated park that brought new life to a rusty, unused-for-decades elevated subway rail on Manhattan’s west side. Well now there’s an idea floating around that would turn the whole concept upside down, literally. A subterranean park created from the long-abandoned Williamsburg Trolley Terminal, on Delancey Street in NYC’s Lower East Side. The station hasn’t been in service, or even used, since 1948.

The brain child of Dan Barasch and James Ramsey, this park—the Lowline—would be the first of its kind, and one of the very few green spaces on the LES. The first reaction people have, aside from fascination, is the more rational, “But how the heck are you gonna get plants to grow underground, away from the rays of the sun.”

Read More

Advertisement

Sign Up


Connect With Travel + Leisure
  • Travel+Leisure
  • Tablet
  • Available devices

Already a subscriber?
Get FREE ACCESS to the digital edition


Advertisement


Advertisement

Advertisement

Marketplace