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NYC Hoedown: American Ballet Theatre Celebrates "Rodeo"

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When American Ballet Theatre revives this week at New York City Center its production of Rodeo, it celebrates the 70th anniversary of a milestone: the first truly American ballet, with an evocative score by Aaron Copland, painterly sets by Oliver Smith, and the groundbreaking choreography of Agnes de Mille. De Mille’s dance combined classical ballet with Broadway and popular styles, including square dance, pantomime (cowboys ride imaginary horses and rope cattle), and an exuberant tap dance solo.

Tap dance in ballet?  In this Western love story, where a cowgirl falls in love with a champion roper who dazzles with a tap tour de force—de Mille’s novel use of tap dance was and remains a showstopper.  And in a lead up to the ABT’s performances of the landmark Rodeo, ABT dancers, including Craig Salstein, who performs the role of the champion roper, gave tap dance lessons to 100 New York City public school children at South Street Seaport.

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Frieze Art Fair Opens in London

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In London this weekend? Don't miss the 10th annual Frieze Art Fair (Oct. 11 - 14), in Regent’s Park. With 170 participating contemporary art galleries from 34 countries (not to mention the splashy May launch of a sister fair in New York), this is its most international year yet. One major highlight: the inaugural Frieze Masters, a sort of fair-within-a-fair exhibiting works that date back to ancient times—an unprecedented move for Frieze, which has to date focused solely on living artists. Set on Gloucester Green in a temporary structure designed by New York–based architect Annabelle Selldorf with transparent walls and silver birch trees, it's all about old meeting new.

—Christine Ajudua is Travel + Leisure's London correspondent.

Credit: Gaetano Gandolfi (Bologna 1734 -1802 Bologna); Venus ordering armour for Aeneas at Vulcan's forge

Secrets of New York City's Chelsea Galleries

Leonardo Drew Chelsea gallery

We recently took a spellbinding 90-minute tour of Chelsea with David Behringer, founder of The Two Percent Gallery Tours (917/727-7687; $200 with a private group of three or less). The focus was his five favorite exhibitions—a godsend for art-world rookies—but also included some little-known facts about the area (for example: did you know 19th-street is filled with starchitecture by everyone from Frank Gehry to Jean Nouvel? And that the Oreo cookie was born in Chelsea market in 1912?). For more Behringer's favorite gallery stops, check out this Weekend Getaway. Here are some of the gallery highlights:

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Pacific Northwest in Time-Lapse

I’m a sucker for time-lapse photography. I’m also a sucker for the Pacific Northwest. Combine the two and you have this mesmerizing work—some 260,000 stitched-together pics—from Portland-based photographer John Eklund, who was kind enough to let us share it.

Rich Beattie is the executive digital editor at Travel + Leisure.

Fashion Documentary Shows the World as a Runway

When Diana Vreeland was making her first forays into her career as a fashion editor, she wrote her dear readers the now oft-quoted suggestion, “Why don't you paint a map of the world on all four walls of your boys' nursery so they won't grow up with a provincial point of view?” All things considered, this was one of her more realistic tips, as compared to her enquiring why we don’t wear violet velvet mittens with everything or rinse our children’s hair in dead champagne.

In “Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel,” a fashion documentary in theaters today, Sept. 21, Ms. Vreeland’s ascendance from middle-school dropout to the most iconic fashion editor to date is largely attributed to her extravagant global vision. Never one to be confined, Ms. Vreeland saw no reason not to use the world as a catwalk and spearheaded legendary shoots, such as the 26-page spread of a fur-swaddled Veruschka scaling the mountains of Japan with a seven foot tall sumo wrestler. No one reads magazines just to see their own backyard, so why not blast them with images of France? Egypt? Or—her personal favorite—Russia?

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Paris Cabaret Opens in London

Paris’s oldest cabaret is popping up in London this fall, performing Forever Crazy within a purpose-built venue on South Bank, behind the National Theatre, between September 18 (it kicks off during Fashion Week—the dancers’ shoes are custom-designed by Christian Louboutin) and December 16.

NYC’s New Park Concept: Underground

First there was the High Line, an elevated park that brought new life to a rusty, unused-for-decades elevated subway rail on Manhattan’s west side. Well now there’s an idea floating around that would turn the whole concept upside down, literally. A subterranean park created from the long-abandoned Williamsburg Trolley Terminal, on Delancey Street in NYC’s Lower East Side. The station hasn’t been in service, or even used, since 1948.

The brain child of Dan Barasch and James Ramsey, this park—the Lowline—would be the first of its kind, and one of the very few green spaces on the LES. The first reaction people have, aside from fascination, is the more rational, “But how the heck are you gonna get plants to grow underground, away from the rays of the sun.”

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Call for Entries: 2013 Travel + Leisure Design Awards

Thoughtful design makes travel better, shaping everything from fashion and luggage to hotel rooms and city skylines. Now we want to know what inspires you.

The 2013 Design Awards winners, representing 12 categories, will be chosen by a panel of outstanding experts in their fields. Jury members include architect Deborah Berke; chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson; designer Reed Krakoff; Deyan Sudjic, director of London’s Design Museum; Stephen Burks, design director for Readymade Projects; interior designer Alexandra Champalimaud; and author and style maven Amy Fine Collins.

Last year’s winners included 25hours Hotel HafenCity in Hamburg, Germany (Best Large Hotel); Harpa Reykjavík Concert Hall & Conference Center in Reykjavík, Iceland (Best Performance Space); and Sur Mesure par Thierry Marx and Camélia restaurants at Mandarin Oriental, Paris (Best Restaurant).

If you’re excited about something that we should consider for the 2013 awards, please drop us an email at designawards@aexp.com or fill out an application here. The deadline for nominations is Monday, October 1.

The winning entries will be published in our March 2013 issue.

What to Do in the Host Cities of the Republican and Democratic Conventions

Republican Convention & Democratic Convention
cities

Three things you didn’t know about the host cities of this month’s political confabs.

Tampa, Florida

It’s the birthplace of the Cuban sandwich, invented in the suburb of Ybor City in the 19th century by cigar-factory workers, who stuffed flaky white bread with ham, pork, salami, Swiss cheese, mustard, and pickles. Try one at the Columbia (2217 E. Seventh Ave.; $), Florida’s oldest restaurant.

Set on the waterfront, Bayshore Boulevard has the world’s longest continuous sidewalk, measuring 4 1/2 miles. It’ll take you by the marina and some of the city’s most historic houses.

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The Kids Will Love: James Turrell's New "Skyspace" Installation

James Turrell's Skyspace

No, a UFO hasn’t landed on Houston’s Rice University campus—it’s the latest Skyspace from artist James Turrell. Named the Suzanne Deal Booth Centennial Pavilion (for a Rice alumna and Turrell’s former assistant), the ethereal installation frames the sky through an aperture in a thin steel roof; at dawn and dusk, colored lights transform the structure, creating a mesmerizing effect. The space also hosts concerts—fitting, since the renowned Shepherd School of Music is next door.

Photo by Casey Dunn for Texas Monthly

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