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Is it Rude to ask Someone to Quiet a Child on a Plane?

child crying on airplane

A: If the child is an infant, try to be sympathetic. Intervening won’t help, but some earplugs might. When an older child is misbehaving (kicking the back of your seat, for example), then go ahead. Usually, talking directly to the parent—or even the child—will do the trick. If the problem persists, you should involve a flight attendant to keep the situation from escalating.

37: The percentage of passengers who would prefer to sit next to a smelly adult than a crying baby.

Source: Harris Interactive

Melanie Lieberman is the Editorial Projects Assistant and a member of the Trip Doctor News Team. You can follow her on twitter at @LittleWordBites.

Illustration © Images.com/Corbis

TSA Has Over $500,000 in Forgotten Pocket Change from 2012

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In fiscal 2012, travelers left $531,000 in pennies, nickels, and dimes at airport security checkpoints, according the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Nearly 95% of the loose change collected came from domestic flights, with $22,000 coming from LAX alone. Altogether, the TSA has amassed over $2 million in the last five years.

What is the TSA planning on doing with all the money?

Currently it sits mostly untouched in an “aviation security fund,” but Florida representative Jeff Miller last week issued a committee report recommending the unused coins go toward upgraded travel amenities for members of the U.S. military and their families while traveling.

Congress is set to vote later this week on Miller's bill.

Peter Schlesinger is a research assistant at Travel + Leisure, and a member of the Trip Doctor News Team. You can follow him on Twitter at @pschles08.

Photo credit: iStockphoto

FCC Gets On Board With In-Flight Phone Calls

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

The days of shutting down cell phones from takeoff to landing may soon be behind us. Next month, the Federal Communications Commission will address the proposal to lift the ban on in-flight phone use, which they call “outdated” and “restrictive.”

Now that long-standing safety concerns have been debunked, the FCC is looking to join France, the UAE, Singapore, and a number of other countries already allowing in-flight calls. This comes on the heels of the FAA’s recent decision to drop restrictions on other personal electronics last month.

Read More

Turkish Airlines Brings Startups Into the Spotlight for Flying Investors

Turkish Airlines is now catering to specific kinds of fliers—namely, investors. The airlines’ new in-flight entertainment, Invest on Board, highlights a selection of startup pitches from the online platform eTohum to help investors support the next big idea.

Eleven videos are currently available to watch on the Invest on Board website, and while most of the companies are based in Turkey, the service may expand to include international startups if investors take a liking to it. With in-air resources like this, along with WiFi availability and a lift of the ban on electronic devices, it looks as if airlines are working to keep you plugged in—no matter how many thousands of feet above the office you may be.

Maria PedoneMaria Pedone is on the digital team at Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter at @mariapedestrian.

4 Travel Tips from Virgin Atlantic’s Flight Attendants

 

T+L dropped in on Virgin Atlantic’s flight-attendant training and gleaned four travel pointers you can use, too.

Foods to Avoid: Onions, cauliflower, cabbage, and carbonated beverages can make you feel bloated at high altitudes.

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate: Drink three quarts of water: one before, one during, and one after your flight. Also bring a facial spray with essential oils (plain water is drying).

Healthy Hint: Polyphenol-rich fruit juices (cranberry; pomegranate) reduce the risk of blood clots. Ditto oily fish.

Don’t Forget: The night before you check out, place your shoes with your passport and wallet in the hotel’s safe. You’ll never forget anything in the safe again!

Kathryn O'Shea-Evans
Kathryn O'Shea-Evans is an associate editor at
Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter @ThePluckyOne.

 


Photo by istockphoto.com

Do I Need to Lock My Bag When I Fly?

luggage lock

Last year, 26 million bags were reported mishandled worldwide; of those, 12.9 percent were pilfered or damaged, according to global aviation consultancy SITA. It may sound like a lot, but that still comes down to just about one bag per 1,000 passengers. Want to reduce the risk? Be sure to get the right lock—only those with Travel Sentry or Safe Skies emblems are TSA-approved.

45: The percentage drop in mishandled bags worldwide from 2007 to 2012.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.


 

Photo by istockphoto.com

TSA Welcomes Southwest Airlines and Members of Military to PreCheck

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Keep your belt on!  

Southwest Airline’s frequent-flyer members need no longer undress to pass airport security. Today, the carrier became the eighth domestic airline to offer TSA PreCheck, a program to pre-approve travelers for expedited security screenings.  

The president of the US Travel Association, Roger Dow, calls the initiative “decidedly pro-traveler.” It’s meant to make travel easy, so that people fly—and fly often.

By the end of December, Pre-Check will be available to all members of the military at every airport in the country offering the service. At this time, military personnel can enjoy the perk at 10 domestic airports. 

Read More

American and US Airways Merger Takes Flight

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Next month, American Airlines and US Airways will join together, forming the world’s largest airline, thanks to an agreement with the Justice Department reached on Tuesday morning. 

Read More

Airport and Holiday Travel Twitter Chat on Wednesday, November 13th

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Going home for the holidays? Thanksgiving is one of the biggest travel days of the year and to prepare, we'll be discussing airport and holiday travel strategies, tips, and advice this Wednesday, November 13th from 2-3pm EDT.

Ask our panel of insiders for their expert advice!

The Hosts:

Mark Orwoll, T+L International Editor, @orwoll

Jennifer Flowers, T+L Travel News Editor and Trip Doctor team member, @TLTripDoctor

Read More

New Air Travel Rules Make Flying Easier for Disabled Passengers

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The Department of Transportation has added new rules to make air travel easier for passengers with disabilities. From ticket purchasing to check-in to the flight itself, the entire experience should be accessible within two years. Here are some of the changes you'll be noticing:

  • Airline websites will be easier to use for everyone: Becoming more accessible for individuals with disabilities—based on the Website Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)—websites will actually become more accessible for everyone with improved visuals and clearer forms to fill out.

  • Same goes for automated kiosks: On top of being at varying heights for those in wheelchairs, check-in kiosks will also meet WCAG criteria. Every new kiosk installed must be accessible, until 25 percent of the kiosks at that location are usable by all.

    Read More

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