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The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending April 19, 2013

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ABC News's Genevieve Shaw Brown gets the scoop on a new program called Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUP, for short), that brings therapy dogs to LAX to help ease the nerves of wary travelers. (Nikki Ekstein)

Want a discount at your favorite restaurant? Put away your phone! CNN Money's Erin Kim reports on phone-free dining. (N.E.)

Here's a fascinating interactive graphic from The New Yorker that breaks down the average income for residents surrounding each of the five boroughs' subway stops. (N.E.)

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The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending April 12, 2013

Fans of the Ping Island rescue operation scene in Wes Anderson's Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou will love these Tokyo Times photos of the abandoned Fujiya Hotel in Shimoda. (Matt Haber)

Coffee fanatics should check out David Farley's Afar piece "Coffeland," in which the author went to southern Ethiopia to learn more about coffee culture. (M.H.)

Vanity Fair's William Langewiesche goes inside the mind of Felix Baumgartner, the daredevil who undertook the highest free-fall in history last October. (M.H.)

Real life princess (and mother-to-be), the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton will soon be the godmother of a new cruise ship, the Royal Princess, reports Chloe Berman of Travel Weekly UK. (Peter Schlesinger)

The Twitterverse is now expanding into music. According to Mashable's Chris Taylor, the social network is launching an app today after its acquisition of the music discovery site We Are Hunted. All the more tunes for your weekend getaway. (Maria Pedone)

Jay-Z's "Open Letter" says all it takes to go to Cuba is an OK from the President, but CBS News travel editor Peter Greenberg isn't about to let you believe it. Over on his blog, he sets the record straight for those who aren't buddies with the First Family (or prefer to do things legally). (Nikki Ekstein)

Travel Weekly's Michelle Baran takes an in-depth look at the rise of culinary travel in the last decade. (N.E.)

Introducing Celebrity's Global Insiders, Powered by Travel + Leisure

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If you're reading this, chances are you're a fan of Travel + Leisure and our sibling publications, Food & Wine and Departures. Now, all three publications are teaming up with Celebrity Cruises to turn passengers into expert travelers.

American Express Publishing and Celebrity Cruises are proud to announce a collaboration that will provide Celebrity's guests with insider facts, travel tips, and amazing finds from around the world thanks to Celebrity's Global Insiders, a group of experts in everything from food to fashion.

Meet Celebrity's Global Insiders:

° Kate Betts, an award-winning magazine editor and the author of Everyday Icon: Michelle Obama and the Power of Style. Betts is a contributing editor at Travel + Leisure and Time and was previously the editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar, and the fashion news director of Vogue.
° Julia Dimon, a journalist, TV correspondent for Outside Today, and nationally syndicated columnist. Dimon has been featured as a travel expert on ABC, NBC, MSNBC and in The New York Times, among other publications.
° Jack Ezon, president of Ovation Vacations, a company specializing in luxury travel experiences. He appears on the Travel + Leisure A-List and is one of the most influential travel advisors in the U.S.
° Marc Murphy, executive chef and owner of Benchmarc Restaurants, Landmarc and Ditch Plains, as well as Benchmarc Events by Marc Murphy. Murphy also is a judge on Food Network’s top-rated show, Chopped.
° Alisa Ng, founder and CEO of L-atitude.com, a curated online marketplace for travel and fashion enthusiasts. Ng launched the site in 2010, and it has since become an e-commerce partner for Travel + Leisure, and was included in “Best of the Web” features in InStyle, Departures and Town & Country.
° Adam Sachs, a freewheeling travel, food and lifestyle writer. Sachs is a contributing editor for Travel + Leisure and Bon Appetit, and also writes for GQ, Details, and T, among other publications.

T+L's editors will also be creating destination guides packed with details and information about Celebrity's worldwide destinations. The destination guides will cover 150 of Celebrity Cruises’ ports of call and include insider tips, local hidden gems, and “must see” experiences at each destination. Celebrity will feature the content on its web site, in brochures, and onboard.


Photo courtesy of Celebrity Cruises

Crowdsourcing: What to Do When You're Near French Laundry in Napa


View Napa Valley in a larger map

We asked true travel pros what to do near the French Laundry, in Napa Valley, California. Want to share your advice? Join our community on Facebook at facebook.com/travelandleisure and at Twitter @TravlandLeisure.

“Ask for one of the redone suites at Auberge du Soleil ($$$$). The hotel has a gorgeous pool and views.” —Michelle Finkelstein Murre, via Facebook

“The burger at Farmstead ($$$) is the most delicious I’ve ever tasted; ditto the chocolate pie.” —Tosh Giles, via Facebook

“You MUST visit the candlelit Del Dotto wine caves (1445 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena) and do a barrel tasting!” —@allierose12

“I head to Oakville Grocery Co. for the best picnic fixings in Napa.” —Sam Rudd, via Facebook

“At the French Laundry ($$$$), I love to stop by the garden across the street and talk to the chefs as they snip herbs.” —Elizabeth Hansen, via Facebook

The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending April 5, 2013

We all know airport food isn't what it used to be—and that's a good thing. CNN's Beth Kaufman takes things a step further by ranking the best bites at terminals across the country, from FLL to LAX. (Nikki Ekstein)

Calling all futurists! Each year, the Crystal Cabin Awards highlight the best ideas for in-flight innovation. You might not see any of them at 35,000 feet just yet, but Skift picks out the most viable (and interesting) finalists before the winners are announced next week. (N.E.)

No outlet? No problem. These eight solar-powered mobile chargers presented by Mashable's Matt Petronzio make sure you don't miss a tweet. (Maria Pedone)

Coming soon to Colorado: My 420 Tours, vacation packages for marijuana tourists. Bloomberg Businessweek's Eric Sptiznagel talks to Matt Brown and James Walker, 420's founders. (Matt Haber)

Ever wonder what all the different lights atop The Empire State Building signify? New York's Emma Whitford explains all. (M.H.)

What does it really mean when someone shouts "Is there a doctor on the plane?!" The Atlantic's Celine Gounder looks at Medical Emergencies at 40,000 Feet. (M.H.)

Troy Knapp, aka, the Mountan Man who lived—and robbed cabins—in the wilds of southern Utah was finally caught by the authorities this week after nearly a decade off the grid and on the lam. Men's Journal's Jacob Bayham was already profiling the wilderness-savvy fugitive for the magazine. (M.H.)

"I always drink to world peace." The New York Times Magazine has a nice interactive map of Times reporters' favorite places to drink worldwide. (M.H.)

Smarter Travel's Caroline Costello muses on the pros and cons of tipping. (Peter Schlesinger)

Arthur Frommer reacquires the rights to his namesake brand from Google. Skift's Jason Clampet has some details. (P.S.)

Got a recommendation of your own? Share it in the comments.

Insider Secret: Travel in May for Great Values

May is shoulder season in many popular destinations – the weather is pleasant, the crowds are slim, and rates are lower. Here are some great-value getaways to consider.

Florida Keys: Parrot Key Resort, Florida Keys

Opened in 2008, Parrot Key Resort is one of Key West’s newest properties. Each of the spacious waterfront rooms has a patio, porch, or balcony. There are four pools, tropical gardens, and if you like watersports, you can kayak, paddleboard, and Jet Ski during your stay. The resort is near Mallory Square and other attractions of Old Town. Doubles from $179/night in May (versus from $239/night in April).

Related: Best Affordable Beach Resorts

New England: Ocean Edge Resort, Brewster, Cape Cod

Originally built for one of Brewster’s wealthiest residents, this seaside property has 337 guestrooms. Families can also choose to stay in stand-alone villas on the waterfront or around the Jack Nicklaus golf course. The resort has two year-round indoor pools, three outdoor pools, tennis courts, and access to the Cape Cod Bike Trail. Head to the town of Chatham for shopping or drive 40 minutes to Provincetown at the tip of the Cape. Although May temperatures not quite warm enough for a dip in the ocean, you can enjoy walks on the quiet beach and build sandcastles. Doubles from $119/night at The Villages, and from $175/night at The Mansion in May (versus from $250/night in July).

Caribbean: Hermitage Plantation Inn, Nevis

The airy, pastel gingerbread cottages of this inn are in a tropical garden of a former sugar plantation. Full tea service is served on the Great House veranda every day at 4 p.m.—a nod to the isle’s British heritage. Try the inn’s rum punch; they have their own 350-year-old recipe that’s a closely guarded secret. Doubles from $150/night starting April 15 (versus from $255 in high season).

Colorado Rockies: Sky Hotel, Aspen, CO

At the bottom of Aspen Mountain, Sky Hotel has 90 guest rooms that were recently renovated. The lobby is a cozy gathering place, with log-beam ceilings, high-back upholstered chairs, and a complimentary wine hour from 5 to 6 p.m. every evening. The property has more than one building and some rooms open to the outdoors. Doubles from $129/night in May (versus from $299/night in June/July and from $450/night in winter ski season).

Pacific Northwest: Rosario Resort, Orcas Island, WA

Orcas Island is an ideal Northwest escape for those who love nature, outdoor activities, and cultural attractions. Rosario Resort surrounds guests with the beauty of the San Juan Islands, offering views of East Sound and Cascade Bay. The Bayside Rooms are a short walk from the Moran Mansion and Rosario Marina and feature sliding-glass doors that open onto a patio or balcony with dramatic island views. Activities include kayaking and whale watching on Puget Sound, visiting the local Farmer’s Market, and touring artisans’ studios. Doubles from $119/night April through June (versus from $149/night in July/August).

More From Travel + Leisure:

Best Caribbean Islands for Foodies

America’s Best All-Inclusive Resorts

World’s Coolest Ferris Wheels

America’s Best Places to Eat Like a Local

Surprising Number of Travel Innovations Announced Today

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Strange things are afoot in the travel world today. It seems like our inboxes have been flooded by announcements of weird and wonderful innovations. Here's a selection of the most interesting news of the day (that would be April 1, by the way).

Ever the publicity hound, Richard Branson announced that his engineering team has secretly developed the world's first glass-bottom airplane. (Picture above) The plane's underbelly will be completely see-through, allowing travelers the "opportunity to look down on the beautiful scenery of Great Britain as they fly." But rest assured: Cabin crew will be trained to calm the nerves of vertigo-prone fliers. (Amy Farley)

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The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending March 29, 2013

The Department of Transportation delivered a sobering assessment of the safety record of recently shuttered Fung Wah Bus company, known for ferrying people cheaply between Boston and New York. Transportation Nation's Alex Goldmark reports. (Amy Farley)

Where’s Europe's dirty money? Gadling's Anna Brones reports that Oxford researchers tested currencies across the continent and found that the Danish krone has the highest bacteria count of them all. Hey, Denmark: Ever heard of money laundering? (A.F.)

A Norwegian economist is in the spotlight after proposing that airlines charge passengers according to their weight, a move that he claims “may provide significant benefits to airlines, passengers and society at large." CNN's James Durston has the scoop. (A.F.)

Cheeeeeeese! Slate presents a collection of vintage tourist shots by photographer Roger Minick, bringing back all sorts of memories of childhood family vacations. (Matt Haber)

Another slideshow, this time a beautiful side-by-side comparison of present-day Paris with photos from the turn of the century. (M.H.)

What happens to a man stuck in the 'It's a Small World' ride for 30 minutes?  (M.H.)

Do not try this: Russian tourists illegally scaled the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. Gawker's Max Read presents their admittedly pretty awesome (but so wrong!) photos. (M.H.)

The most terrifying hotel-based horror movie of all time now has a documentary dedicated to its most obsessive fans. Rodney Ascher's Room 237, which presents various interpretations of Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, is out in limited release and is being hotly debated. Back in July 2010, The Atlantic's James Parker checked into The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado to experience the place that inspired Stephen King's novel. (M.H.)

A Los Angeles restaurant has gotten some attention for tweeting about its no-show guests. (Peter Schlesinger)

A list of international airlines that'll keep WiFi junkies happy, via The Points Guy.(Jennifer Flowers)

How stunning is this new airport terminal that just opened in Amman, Jordan? Plus, it's super green. Inhabitat's Charley Cameron shows us the Queen Alia Airport. (Nikki Ekstein

Google maps steps it up again, with live transit updates in NYC, Washington DC, and Salt Lake City. TechCrunch's Drew Olanoff has the scoop (hat tip to Skift's Samantha Shankman). (N.E.)

Food Trends: What's Hot and Not

In-N-Out Burger

Overhyped:
• Cupcakes
• Tomato foam
• No-bookings policies
• Kobe beef
• Wooden benches
Portland, Oregon
• Scandinavian cuisine
• Kale

Just Right: In-N-Out Burger

Underrated:
• Callaloo
• Filipino cuisine
• Portland, Maine
• Chairs with backs
• Extreme-aged beef
• Accepting reservations
• Tomato sauce
• Paletas (ice pops)

Tells us what you think on Facebook and Twitter.

Photo courtesy of In-N-Out Burger

The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending March 22, 2013

It's been a lonely six months for Lady Liberty, who's been all alone in the New York Harbor without any visitors since Hurricane Sandy forced away the crowds. But the National Parks Service has just announced that the Statue of Liberty will reopen on--guess what day?--July 4. (Nikki Ekstein)

In January, T+L included ride-sharing (bike, car, private plane) as one of 2013's most important travel trends. Now, Forbes' Micheline Maynard has a few thoughts on Jump Seat, the new Airbnb for, well, the air. (Maria Pedone)

Another entry for the What Took them So Long? files: American Airlines began quietly testing a new boarding process that allows fliers without carry-on bags to board before their wheelie-toting counterparts. Blogger Johnny Jet broke the story. (Amy Farley)

Photographer Jeffrey Milstein's hypnotic images of airports from above reveal the strange patterns and intricate geometries of these much-maligned hubs. John Metcalfe takes a look for the Atlantic Cities. (A.F)

Fans of Indiana Jones movies will not want to miss the real life swashbuckling tale of one man's journey in the jungles of the South Pacific to find a lost temple of Israel. Matthew Fishbane's 'Solomon's Island' is a collaboration between Tablet Magazine and The Atavist. For $2.99 you can read the entire 20,000-word story with maps and timelines. (Matt Haber)

The Rumpus presents a short comic from Liam Golden called In San Francisco, There Is A Street (M.H.)

Sick of hearing what the pundits and analysts are saying about the economic crisis in Cyprus? Why not read New York's brief interview with Antreas Achilleos, whom they describe as "a random guy from Cyprus." Sample question: "What should Cyprus be famous for, other than Russian money-laundering and economic turmoil?" The answer: really good cheese. (M.H.)

Coming soon to New York's subway system: Interactive touchscreen kiosks. Fast Company Co.Design's Mark Wilson has the download. (M.H.)

Slate presents a slideshow of hunters and their prey by photographer David Chancellor. Some of these images might be familiar to readers of The New York Times Magazine, which featured several last year, but they're still as surprising and engrossing the second tome around. (M.H.)

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