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Battle of the Ultra-Slim Notebooks

ultra-slim notebook

The ultralight MacBook Air is no longer the only option for travelers who want a real computer that fits in an airplane seat pocket. In the past six months, several major PC rivals have released an ultra-slim notebook—a class of laptops that are generally less than 0.8 inches thick, use quick-start solid-state drives (which means they boot up in almost no time), and have full-size, physical keyboards that are comfortable to use. Are these new models MacBook Air wannabes—or killers?

The Asus UX21 11.6-inch-screen Ultrabook (from $999) has a sexy aluminum alloy body and keyboard. It’s expected to power up in less than 30 seconds, and entry-level models are projected to sell for the same as a starter MacBook Air. Like its Mac rival, the Asus is available with a state-of-the-art, speedy i7 processor.

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Tech Innovator: Bluelounge's Dominic Symons

Dominic Symons

Who He Is: A Swiss designer with a passion for technology, Dominic Symons recognized early on that as our reliance on mobile devices grows, so does the organizational headache of storing and charging all these products. His Bluelounge studio offers a line of innovative and simple solutions for tech management.

His Big Idea: Symons began with the minimalist Cableyoyo ($5), a sleek, spool-like contraption that keeps power cords in place. His Sanctuary ($130) is a stylish box for organizing (and charging!) all your devices while keeping those cords neatly tucked away in a hidden compartment. Bluelounge’s latest invention is the MiniDock ($20), a charger that plugs into a wall socket and props up your iPhone or iPod, keeping it off the floor and out of the way.

Photo by Michael Ting

Battle of the Smart-Phone Keyboards

smart-phone keyboard

Whether you’re dashing off a quick text before the airplane door closes or typing a business report on the go, the accuracy and comfort of your smart-phone keyboard are important. Contrary to popular belief, touch screens haven’t entirely taken over. New BlackBerry-style handsets with physical keyboards are still coming out at a consistent clip, while innovative on-screen keyboard technologies such as the Android-compatible Swype, which allows you to drag your finger across the “keys,” connect-the-dots-style, are supplying revolutionary ways to make touch screens more accurate and simpler to use.

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Jean-Marie Hullot’s New Photo Encyclopedia

Innovator Jean-Marie Hullot

Innovator Jean-Marie Hullot

Who He Is: “I am a passionate traveler, a passionate photographer, and a passionate technologist,” says Hullot, a former Apple apps CTO who created software for the first Macintosh computer. After leaving Apple in 2005, he spent two years taking inspiring trips.

His Big Idea: Hullot conceived Fotopedia, which includes an image-driven encyclopedia made from user-submitted photos with minimal text—a visual Wikipedia of sorts. Lately, Fotopedia apps for iPad focused on UNESCO World Heritage sites, Paris, and (most compellingly) North Korea have given the traditional coffee-table book a digital spin. “In most magazines and books, pictures are used to illustrate a story,” Hullot says. On this app, it’s the image that tells the story.

Photo by Françoise Brenckmann

Lytro Camera: Revolutionary Photography

Ren Ng, inventor of Lytro cameras

Innovator Ren Ng

Who He Is: The 31-year-old rock-climbing enthusiast and Stanford University computer science Ph.D. is a pioneer in light field photography, a process that captures all the light information in a camera’s field of view (every angle, color, etc.), allowing for pictures that can be manipulated, then edited in extraordinary ways.

His Big Idea: Light field photography usually requires upward of 100 digicams, but Ng managed to capture the technology into the pocket-size Lytro camera (on sale by the end of 2011) that offers two revolutionary features: lightning-fast picture-taking (even in low light) and the ability to focus pictures after you take them, so later you can decide: Do you want those distant mountains as your subject? Or that nearby flower? “It’s camera 3.0,” Ng says.

Photo courtesy of Ren Ng

Great Social Travel Websites

Great Travel Social Websites

What’s the best hotel in Aspen? According to Web entrepreneur Travis Katz, it all depends on who you are: a Goldman Sachs banker might want the luxury and cosseting service of the Little Nell, while a 20-year-old yoga instructor on a budget might opt for the more-bang-for-your-buck Limelight Lodge. Earlier this year, Katz, a former MySpace executive, officially launched gogobot.com, a sort of Facebook for travelers that lets you exchange tailored hotel, restaurant, and other destination recommendations with like-minded friends on the site and through other social networks. Gogobot, which creates stylish destination scrapbooks for users by drawing from their manually submitted reviews and FourSquare and Facebook check-ins, is based on the premise that travelers trust their friends’ recommendations over those of guidebooks or online user-generated review sites like TripAdvisor.

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NYC’s New Tech-Focused Hotel

201108-b-digital-traveler-tech-hoteljpg

Innovator Simon Woodroffe

Who He Is: Not since Richard Branson has Britain seen an entrepreneur as iconoclastic as Woodroffe. He designed rock shows for Stevie Wonder and Rod Stewart, launched the chain of conveyor-belt YO! Sushi restaurants, and then created Yotel in 2007, which blends the self-service of Japanese pod hotels (touch-screen check-in kiosks; motorized retractable beds) with a stylish, airplane-cabin vibe.

His Big Idea: Woodroffe’s newest outpost, Yotel Times Square (doubles from $259), in New York City, is a living demonstration of convenience through technology. The hotel features the world’s first luggage robot, a cranelike contraption that retrieves bags and stores them in a sleek white wall of drawers in the lobby. At its restaurant, Dohyo, the tables can be lowered into the floor, opening up the space for performances. Guest “cabins” all have Yotel’s trademark “techno-wall,” with flat-screen TV’s, music and power services, and device-storage areas.

Photo courtesy of Yotel

Cool Eco-Friendly Travel Gadgets

green travel devices

When it comes to the environment, technology can be a double-edged sword. New devices use up energy and precious resources, but they also offer exciting ways to travel green. These days, the best are doing this while also lightening their footprints. Take the Android-powered Samsung Replenish smartphone ($50), made from recycled plastic and without many of the toxic chemicals found in other phones. It is loaded with a bundle of eco-friendly apps (Treehugger; National Audubon Society) and can be powered using a solar battery charger. Music lovers, meanwhile, can take comfort in knowing that the new Etón Soulra XL ($300) iPod dock, which is designed to resemble an old-school boom box, not only charges while it plays but lasts up to five hours on a single solar charge—perfect for the beach. Unfortunately, most travel-size solar chargers are still not strong enough to power your laptop. In the meantime, though, there’s the Energy Star–rated IDAPT i1 Eco ($24.99). Constructed of recycled materials, it lets you charge nearly any device on the go. The green edge: when a gadget is fully powered, the IDAPT turns itself off—conserving essential electricity.

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Top Italian Food Guide Apps

Elizabeth Minchilli

Who She Is: Though she’s been known for years as a writer of books about Italian interiors, Elizabeth Minchilli’s greatest passion is food—an interest that blossomed after her family moved from St. Louis to Rome when she was 12. “By the time I was 14, I was cooking for the whole family,” recalls the writer, who, in addition to writing for Food & Wine, posts daily about Italian cuisine and travel on her blog.

Her Big Idea: “I’ve always had my own list of restaurants to recommend to friends when they come to town,” Minchilli explains. “People kept saying, ‘You should do an app.’” Earlier this year, she did just that, with the launch of Eat Rome and Eat Florence ($2.99 each; iTunes). Both are searchable, GPS-enabled apps with Minchilli’s picks and reviews for the best places to eat, drink, and shop for food in each city, complete with downloadable maps for offline viewing (to avoid costly roaming charges).

Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Minchilli

Top Discount Food Apps

discount food apps

Five-course dinners at top restaurants around the country no longer have to be such a costly part of your trip, thanks to an influx of restaurant deals found both online and via mobile apps. The BlackboardEats site offers discounts—such as 30 percent off dinner at Los Angeles’s Mo-Chica or New York’s Matsuri—to anyone who signs up. All you have to do is present the discount code at the restaurant at any time. Every venue is handpicked by a staff of professional restaurant reviewers (many from the now-defunct print version of Gourmet). Sometimes the deals involve mystery dishes that are only available to members, making it more of a food enthusiasts’ club than a coupon service.

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