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Stephen Colbert's Favorite Things to Do in Charleston

Stephen Colbert

Long before he agreed to take over as host of the Late Show, Stephen Colbert was just another Charleston boy—swimming, fishing, and skateboarding down the quiet streets of what he recalls as a “sleepy Southern town.” Today, the South Carolina city is still one of his favorite vacation spots. Read on for Colbert’s down-home haunts.

Stay: Growing up, Colbert helped his mother run a now-defunct B&B in their house in the South of Broad neighborhood. “Back then, if I booked a guest, I got ten percent. A kid could have a whole weekend of fun on fifteen bucks.” Hotels he remembers from boyhood: the Francis Marion Hotel ($)—with views of the harbor—and 1853’s Mills House Wyndham Grand Hotel ($).

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Art Collector Jane Holzer Talks Andy Warhol and Their Mutual Love for Palm Beach

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In February, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, Florida, is honoring a hometown girl made good, Jane Holzer, who went to New York in the early 1960s and dazzled Andy Warhol, Diana Vreeland, and the known pop universe.

To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar (February 2–May 25, 2014) includes the high-1960s outfits Holzer—then known as “Baby Jane Holzer”—modeled, as well as Vogue spreads shot by David Bailey and Irving Penn. It’s Warhol-palooza, starring films with Holzer (Screen Test: Jane Holzer, Kiss, etc.) and iconic Warhol pieces like Flowers, Round Jackie, and Heinz Tomato Ketchup Box. These days, Holzer is all grown up but still in love with art, fashion, and sweet home Palm Beach.

Q: When did you first meet Andy Warhol?

A:I was on the street one day, near Bloomingdales, with David Bailey; Andy was on the opposite street corner. After we were introduced, Andy took one look at me and immediately said `Want to be in the movies?’

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Pérez Art Museum Makes Flashy Opening Today in Miami

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In addition to the Art Basel buzz, Miami is getting extra attention today with the opening of the Pérez Art Museum Miami. The three-level, $131 million state of the art building took 28 months to build. Notable features include 200,000 square feet of program space, floor-to-ceiling hurricane resistant windows, and views of both the downtown skyline and Key Biscayne. Verde, the museum's restaurant by Steven Starr, will offer seasonal dishes, craft cocktails, and quick bites like pastries and sandwiches. Designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the venue was inspired by Stiltsville—the atmospheric collection of shacks off the coast of Key Biscayne. Tip: Stay at a Bal Harbour–area hotel for free admission to PAMM and three other museums.

Photo credit: Iwan Baan

Oberoi Dubai's International Amenities

Oberoi, Dubai

With properties scattered everywhere from India to Indonesia, Oberoi Hotels & Resorts has always embraced multiculturalism. And in the United Arab Emirates, crossroads of rampant internationalism, the group’s new Oberoi, Dubai ($$$) is one big global romp, including Arabic coffee at check-in and a general United Nations approach to hospitality. Here’s a look at some of the highlights, country by country.

India: On staff at the city’s first 24-hour spa: Priyanka Chowdhury, who won two gold medals for India in the Yoga Olympics. Relax with the shirodhara treatment, a stream of oil on the forehead.

Japan: At the open-kitchen Umai restaurant ($$$$), Takeyuki Nakagawa is one of the few chefs in the U.A.E. certified to prepare fugu, the poisonous puffer fish that’s a Japanese delicacy.

England: Classic British afternoon tea (house-made scones and lemon curd; authentic clotted cream) gets a twist with Asian-inspired pandan eclairs and Turkish halvah.

Czech Republic: The lobby is dominated by two epic chandeliers: created by the Czech firm Lasvit, each is made from more than 100,000 shimmering crystal pieces. Only in Dubai.

See more up-and-coming hotels.

Courtesy of Oberoi Hotels & Resorts

The Iconic Pool at the Biltmore, Miami

Biltmore Hotel pool, Miami

Why the pool at the Biltmore Hotel, in Coral Gables, Florida, deserves a place in the iconography of travel.

Miami was built on a grandiose dream that somehow came true. The Biltmore’s fanciful half-acre pool—flanked by a Moorish tower and faux-Roman statuary—embodies the infinite possibilities of this city of whimsy. The winter headquarters of the Roaring Twenties, the hotel survived the 1930’s with Busby Berkeley–style aquacades starring Esther Williams; Johnny Weissmuller, in pre-Tarzan days, was a swim coach. By the 1970’s, the derelict Biltmore had become the local version of the hotel in The Shining—as kids, we’d sneak in and use it as a spooky clubhouse. Over time, both hotel and pool reopened, but every swim remains a dip into myth, enveloped by glittering ghosts. $

Hotel courtesy of The Biltmore

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