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Free Online Photography Museum

Stieglitz

Arago is a new, free-access portal to all of the photography archives in France. At launch, the site included the collections of the Direction General des Patrimoines and public establishments under the Ministry of Culture–30,000 representative images from about 20 institutions. Arago will gradually expand to incorporate private collections as well as other public ones. The site is named after French politician and astronomer François Arago, who presented the Daguerrotype process to the Academie des Sciences in 1839, ensuring photography would be France’s gift to the world. Go on, browse—and be transported.

Tina Isaac is a contributor to TravelandLeisure.com.

Photo of Georgia O'Keeffe (1887–1986) by Alfred Stieglitz

Robert Doisneau, Paris les Halles Free iPad App

Doisneau, Paris les Halles

More than 110,000 visitors attended the Spring 2012 exhibition "Doisneau, Paris les Halles," a collection of photographs that portray the city’s demolished wholesale food market at the Hotel de Ville. The exhibition was timely: the old structures are being torn down. But if you missed the show—or were discouraged by the lines and the weather—it’s not too late to capture an enhanced digital experience. Now, you can download the free iPad application, which includes photographs, interviews, and special reports.

Paris-based Tina Isaac is a contributor to TravelandLeisure.com.

Photo courtesy of Doisneau Paris les Halles

The Louvre Expands to Lens, France

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Beginning December 4, 2012, over 200 of the Louvre’s works will be on display in the museum’s new satellite in Lens, a northern city in the Pas-de-Calais department, Picardie.  The collection will remain in the museum, Galerie des Temps, for several years.

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New Paris Restaurant Brings a French Twist to the Classic

Yannick Alléno

It was 1925 when Harry’s New York Bar, the famed American cocktail oasis in Paris, served the first French hot dog. Now, nearly a century later, a new spot in the City of Light takes on chien chaud. Yannick Alléno, the Michelin-starred head chef from Le Meurice, recently launched his first bistro in the imposing Art Deco institution Maison de la Mutualité in the 5th. Terroir Parisien (24 rue Saint Victor), which opened in March, serves seasonal Parisian fare and specialty dishes like mackerel in white wine and sole gratin with duxelles. But the menu highlight is the headlining “Parisian hot dog,” made of veal and served in a crusty baguette. Be advised: the popular veau chaud sells out early—customers should arrive before noon to score one of these gourmet dogs.

Tina Isaac is Travel + Leisure’s Paris correspondent.

Photo by Jean-François Mallet

Luxury Parisian Hotels Rethink Art of Hospitality

Hôtel de Crillon

It’s makeover season in the City of Light—at least for high-end palace hotels. Check into the famed 18th century Hôtel de Crillon (pictured) before it closes this fall for a two-year renovation (set to include the addition of a long-awaited spa). After a sweeping top-down restoration, Le Royal Monceau Raffles became home to a stunning collection of artwork; now, the hotel is expanding into cinema with its film-centric Ciné Brunch and Ciné Snack held every Saturday (hot chocolate, Hermé pastries and popcorn included).

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France Dispatch: Mama Shelter Rolls Out Another Hotel

201206-b-mama-marseille-2jpgCreated by the Trigano family (co-founders of Club Med) and French philosopher Cyril Aouizerate and designed by Philippe Starck, Mama Shelter now counts a second outpost.  The hotel, located near the Port of Marseilles, is slightly smaller than its Paris counterpart.  It has 127 lightly colored–pink, blue, and yellow–rooms, all equipped with iMacs.

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Q+A: Harriet Welty Rochefort, Author of "Joie de Vivre"

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Svelteness, style, and sex appeal: why do the French so effortlessly possess these qualities, and why can’t America get on board? Harriet Welty Rochefort knows the tricks of the French trade. A native Iowan who moved to Paris after college and married a Frenchmen, Rochefort is the author of French Fried: The Culinary Capers of an American in Paris, French Toast: An American in Paris Celebrates the Maddening Mysteries of the French, and the soon to be released Joie de Vivre: Secrets of Wining, Dining, and Romancing Like the French (St. Martin's Press, October 2012, $24.99).

She spoke with Travel + Leisure about not being an Ugly American, the best way to exercise in Paris, and why being a little “off” in considered sexy in Pah-ree.

Q: What advice do you give people traveling to Paris?

A: There’s three things. One, you should hang out in cafés as long as you can. Two, don't be loud, whether you’re on the street or in a restaurant. And three, get out of the Left Bank rut and try the 10th arrondissement (Canal St. Martin) or the 11th where all the savvy chefs have emigrated. 

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France Kicks Off WWI Centennial with Picasso at the Pompidou

Centre Pompidou Metz: Picasso

The Centre Pompidou Metz is marking the centennial of WWI with “1917,” a new exhibition running through September 24. It’s the kickoff event in a series of international commemorations of the Great War and will feature Picasso’s largest work (pictured), a 33-foot-by-33-foot canvas stage curtain made for the controversial ballet “Parade.” Don’t miss Chagall, Rodin, Klee, and the two hundred other artists represented in this highly anticipated retrospective.

Tina Isaac is Travel + Leisure’s Paris correspondent.

Photo by Alamy

New Cocktail Club Opens in Paris

Le Ballroom du Beef Club

The team behind the wildly popular Experimental Cocktail Club has struck again with a brand new speakeasy, Le Ballroom du Beef Club, in the 1st arrondissement. The cocktail scene takes place in the cellar, where the chic sip Salers Smash and Cucumber Fumant. Don’t miss Beef Club, the steakhouse that recently opened on the ground floor.

Tina Isaac is Travel + Leisure’s Paris correspondent.

Photo courtesy of Experimental Cocktail Club

Hermès: Site Specific Shoe Store

201206-b-mag-ephemere_sevres5brunoclerguejpgHermès, the French fashion brand, opened a new pop-up store on the Rue de Sèvres.  The store, which will remain in business until July 19th, is dedicated exclusively to woman’s shoes.  The inventory contains a complete spectrum of summer footwear by Pierre Hardy–including site-specific Oran sandals in hot pink, navy, and orange neoprene for €390–and a special preview of fall boots and shoes.  Next up for Hermès's future: a boutique dedicated to their Chinese contemporary lifestyle brand, Shang Xia.  It’s slated to open at the end of this year.

Tina Isaac is Travel + Leisure’s Paris correspondent.

Photo courtesy of Bruno Clergue

 

 

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