/
Close
Newsletters  | Mobile

A Travel Blog from the Editors of T+L

RSS Feed Posts by Jennifer Flowers

Souvenir-Worthy Kitchen Tools From Around the World

Kitchen Tool: Tagine

Why does a cooking tool make a great souvenir? Because every time you use it, you relive your trip. Try to guess each item’s place of origin.

1. If you’re a nonna making potato dumplings in this boot-shaped nation, you might employ a macchinetta per gnocchi to create the signature indentations.

2. In the Land of Smiles, sticky rice steamers are used to achieve that tender-yet-chewy goodness; serve the rice with khao soi curry.

3. A must-have tool in an island nation obsessed with green tea? The chasen, or bamboo whisk, for blending the powdered matcha into hot water.

Read More

Rebirth: NYC's Le Colonial Restaurant Turns 20—and Gets a New Chef

Ron Wing Wee Hsu

When it comes to eating adventures, Vietnam’s flavor-rich, history-filled cuisine is at the top of my list. And while I’m currently buried under too much work in New York City to fly to Southeast Asia for my fix, there’s a spot in town that I’m hoping will help tide me over for now. You may or may not know Le Colonial, a long-established French-Vietnamese restaurant in Midtown East that had its heyday in the '90s as a hot power hangout. Just in time for its 20th anniversary, the restaurant has brought in a young new chef who is jazzing up the menu.

Read More

Chef's Tour: Boston Eats from Alden & Harlow's Michael Scelfo

Michael Scelfo

Where to find the best food in Boston? The smaller, less-explored neighborhoods, where delicious local haunts are waiting to be uncovered, according to chef Michael Scelfo, whose buzzy new Cambridge restaurant, Alden & Harlow, opened in February. Read on for his perfect day of eating in and around Beantown.

Read More

Trip Doctor: Hotel Tipping Guide

201307-hd-hotel-tippingjpg

When it comes to hotel gratuities, even the most seasoned travelers admit to being stumped. That’s why we’ve put together this handy cheat sheet below, which you can take with you the next time you’re on the road.

  • Bellman: $1 to $2 per bag.

  • Concierge: $10 to $20 for performing a special service, such as scoring tickets to a sold-out event or wrangling lost luggage from your airline.

  • Doorman: $2 for hailing a cab in rush hour or in the rain; $1 for each bag.

  • Housekeeping: $5 to $10 per day. Leave it at the front desk if you want it divided equally among all your housekeepers.

  • Room Service: A service charge is almost always included in the bill. To personally thank your server, 5 percent will suffice.

  • Valet: $5 when your car is delivered.

  • Free Town-Car Service: Because they’re providing a complimentary amenity, drivers are instructed not to expect tips. However, it’s not uncommon for travelers to offer a gratuity. The minimum starts around $5 and goes up as the distance increases. While chauffeurs are generally making above-market wages, they still appreciate being recognized for going the extra mile—literally.

Note: Gratuities are often lower or not expected outside North America. Follow 
local tipping customs when traveling overseas.

Jennifer FlowersJennifer Flowers is the Travel News Editor at Travel + Leisure and part of the Trip Doctor news team. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

Photo credit: Bernd Vogel / Corbis

Chef's Tour: Northern Spain

Travis Swikard

If you’re looking for some travel inspiration this spring, get thee to New York’s Boulud Sud, where Executive Chef Travis Swikard just launched a series of special dinners highlighting the global cuisines he’s obsessed with now—Israel, Greece, Sicily, the Cote d’ Azur, and more (get tickets here). In the meantime, I asked him to share the highlights of his recent culinary adventures in Catalonia and Basque Country.

Read More

Chef’s Tour: L.A. County with David Lefevre

David Lefevre

David Lefevre is making waves with Fishing with Dynamite, his seafood restaurant in Manhattan Beach, California. He’s even been shortlisted for this year’s James Beard Awards—the “Oscars of the food world”—in the category of Best Chef: West. We caught up with him last week when he cooked at New York City’s esteemed James Beard House, where he shared with T+L his perfect day of L.A. eating.

Read More

Chef's Tour: The Ardeche, France

Chef's Tour

It’s not every day that one of France’s most respected chefs—we’re talking the three-Michelin-star, Bocuse d’ Or-winning ilk—would travel to Manhattan and cook for an entire weekend. In fact, it’s been more than 20 years since Régis Marcon of Hôtel et Restaurant Régis et Jacques Marcon has cooked in New York City.

Marcon brought his talented sons Jacques and Paul with him last weekend, teaming up with longtime friend Daniel Boulud to create a series of exquisite meals out of Boulud’s equally Michelin-star-studded Restaurant Daniel. After dropping by the kitchen to chat with Chef Marcon during the city’s annual Citymeals-on-Wheels benefit (Boulud is co-president this year—check out his awesome new Chefs Deliver initiative), I’m dying to dine at his restaurant in France’s south-central Ardèche region. Read on, and then fight me for the last available aisle seat to France tomorrow.

Read More

Orient-Express Claims a New Name in Luxury: Belmond Hotels

201402-hd-orient-express-rebranding_1_jpg

To me, the phrase “Orient-Express” is synonymous with luxury travel: train rides through the Veneto, 16th-century retreats in Cusco, exotic cruises along Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River. That's why I was so surprised to see that the company of the same name, which counts 45 alluring hotels, rail lines, and river cruises in its collection, is changing its moniker to Belmond starting March 10. According to the group, the decision was made in order to “strengthen our brand architecture” and “increase consumer recognition in the marketplace.” The ultimate reason? They never actually owned the name. The trademark had been licensed through SNCF, France’s national railway company, and the group felt that having a name they could call their own might lure more property owners to invest in the brand. Following the change, only the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express train will keep its title.

Read More

How to Open a Bottle of Champagne



Did you know that France's charming Champagne region—home of Moët & Chandon, the mother of all producers—is just a 45-minute train ride from Paris? It's one thing I learned this week when I met the lovely Elise Losfelt, the latest addition to Moët & Chandon's team of nine winemakers, who stopped by talk about the spring release of Moët’s Grand Vintage Brut 2006. The other thing I learned from Elise? How to open a bottle of bubbly without injuring your friends and loved ones. Watch her tutorial, and impress your significant other with your new skills while breaking out the bubbly this Valentine’s Day weekend.

Jennifer FlowersJennifer Flowers is the Travel News Editor at Travel + Leisure and part of the Trip Doctor news team. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

Is Japan Cool? ANA Airways Proves It With New York Fashion Pop-Up

As T+L’s resident Japanophile, I’m always plotting my next trip to Tokyo, not only to revel in one of the world’s great food destinations, but also to discover the city’s amazing shopping scene. Luckily for me, All Nippon Airways (ANA) is participating with iconic department stores Mitsukoshi and Isetan in a Manhattan pop-up store during New York Fashion Week as part of its “Is Japan Cool?” campaign (47 Greene St.; through today, Feb.13).

Read More

Advertisement

Sign Up


Connect With Travel + Leisure
  • Travel+Leisure
  • Tablet
  • Available devices

Already a subscriber?
Get FREE ACCESS to the digital edition


Advertisement


Advertisement

Advertisement

Marketplace