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9 New Restaurants to Try Now

9 New Restaurants to Try Now

New York City

Who doesn’t love a sexy bar with delicious bites? Our new haunt: the banquette-lined, mahogany-clad NoMad Bar ($$$), from the team behind the adjacent NoMad hotel. They had us at pot pie and foie gras, but we stayed for the bacon-wrapped hot dogs with black-truffle mayonnaise, artisanal beers, and perfectly balanced cocktails. In Williamsburg, Brooklyn, chef Michael Psilakis is close to opening a yet-to-be-named beer hall ($$), a 5,000-square-foot homage to Greek street food—crab keftedes; pork-shoulder gyros—with local brews on tap.

Chicago

In the up-and-coming Avondale neighborhood, the laid-back, Korean-American Parachute ($$) is the first opening from Top Chef  vet Beverly Kim and her husband, John Clark. Order the boudin noir with nam phrik and coconut yogurt, and anything from the Asian bread menu (but especially the Chinese bing). Hyde Park’s dining scene just cranked up the dial with Promontory ($$), where chef Jared Wentworth, from Logan Square gastropub Longman & Eagle, serves hearty classics such as lamb navarin and vegetable pot-au-feu.

Austin, Texas

Unexpected encore: those mad geniuses at innovative Japanese restaurants Uchi and Uchiko take a more traditional approach with St. Philip ($$), a pizzeria and bakery in Sunset Valley.

San Francisco

Capitalizing on the flyaway success of State Bird Provisions, the Progress is Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski’s locavore-minded follow-up next door, set to open by the end of the year. In the meantime, head to the Presidio and hit the Commissary ($$$), from Traci des Jardins of Jardinière. Her 112-seat restaurant serves Spanish-inflected dishes such as salt-cod fritters and octopus with pimenton.

Los Angeles

Quinn and Karen Hatfield, the duo behind Hollywood favorites Hatfield’s and the Sycamore Kitchen, are launching Odys & Penelope ($$$) on La Brea Avenue. Main attractions: grilled Monterey Bay squid, smoked short ribs, and whole-bird churrasco. Save us a seat.

New Orleans

Hometown hero John Besh teams up with Brooklyn-based chef Aarón Sánchez (of the Food Network’s Chopped) to open the farm-to-table taqueria Johnny Sánchez ($$) in the Central Business District. The tacos we’re craving: Wagyu-beef barbacoa; squash blossom with burrata.

Restaurants
$ Less than $25
$$ $25 to $75
$$$ $75 to $150
$$$$ More than $150

Jennifer Flowers is the Hotels & Food Editor at Travel + Leisure. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

Photo courtesy of Rush Jagoe

Worth a Look: The High Road with Mario Batali on Hulu Series

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Shackled to your desk today, but in desperate need of an escape? Steal a few minutes for an episode of The High Road with Mario Batali, a twelve-part series of short films on Hulu where the celebrity chef pairs up with famous residents to play tourist in New York City, visiting notable sights while chatting about everything from politics to real-life heroes. We love the unique tone of each vignette, be it a chuckle-worthy hangout at the High Line with Jimmy Fallon, or an eccentric tour of Brooklyn’s Gowanus neighborhood with George Stephanopoulos. The latest installment launches today, and features Batali on a trip with actress Julianna Margulies to the mother of landmarks, the Empire State Building. If a New York State of Mind sounds enticing right about now, check out the newest episode below.

Jennifer FlowersJennifer Flowers is the Hotels & Food Editor at Travel + Leisure. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

Photo courtesy of Ken Goodman

Travel Diary: Just Back From Shanghai

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Just back from China, T+L hotels & food editor Jennifer Flowers shares her best discoveries in this frenetic, hypnotic megacity.

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Chef’s Tour: Dallas with Matt McCallister

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The blue-eyed chef is making waves at his seasonal, Gulf-inspired restaurant, FT33—he even snagged a spot on Food & Wine magazine’s prestigious roster of Best New Chefs this year. We caught up with McCallister to find out his top local haunts in Dallas.

BreakfastSmoke’s Blueberry Pancakes and Smoked Brisket Cornbread Hash. ‘Nuff said.

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Chef’s Tour: Washington. D.C. with José Andrés

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Spanish-American superstar chef José Andrés is busier than ever: his America Eats Tavern opened in June at the Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner in McLean, Va. (we’re dying to try his chicken and dumplings, she-crab soup, and foie gras s’mores), and a highly-anticipated Chinese-Peruvian concept, China Chilcano, is in the works for D.C. We were lucky enough to snag a few minutes of his time and ask for his top eats in and around Our Nation’s Capital.

Breakfast “I usually eat breakfast at home with my daughters, but when I do go out, the Willard Hotel has a great brunch. I remember going there during Christmas for the first time for high tea. The French toast is great there, and I love the eggs benedict.

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Andrew Zimmern’s Bucket List: 31 Meals To Try Before You Die

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Leave it to Andrew Zimmern—the Travel Channel’s peripatetic Bizarre Foods TV host—to create the ultimate foodie traveler’s global bucket list. We love that no place is too fancy (a caviar bar in St. Petersburg, Russia), too humble (noodle soup at a wholesale market in Bangkok), or too far-flung (tuna and lamb ribs in Samoa) to make the cut. We caught up with Zimmern at the Food & Wine Classic in Aspen last weekend to get the inside scoop on his picks. Check out the full list on Pinterest here.

How did you choose your 31 meals?

The word “meal” to me seems limiting: how do you decide on 30 meals in the world when there are hundreds of thousands of places to choose from? I love leading people to travel experiences where they can carve out their own food destiny for themselves. That’s why the majority of my choices ended up being markets. I’m more about people seeking out unique adventures and letting them decide for themselves what they like about it.

Markets can be overwhelming though. How can travelers navigate their way to the best eating experiences?

You should either ask locals for their recommendations, or just look for the longest line. There are hundreds of vendors at any given market, but there’s one guy who’s got the biggest line early in the morning. Guess what? That’s where you should be eating.

Asia’s famous Tsukiji Fish Market in Tokyo isn’t on your list, but Noryangjin Fish Market in Seoul is. Why?

The reason, very simply, is that at Noryangjin is not as touristed or fetishized as Tsukiji, and more importantly, there’s an entire restaurant culture that’s sprung up around the market where anyone can buy a fish or shellfish and take it to the restaurant and have it cooked. That doesn't really exist at Tsukiji market. To me, the essence of travel is about discovery, so I’d rather have someone go to Noryingjan seafood market and become a part of the action and ask around: where’s the restaurant where I can take this amazing yellow snapper to? It's the type of experience that you can go and participate in.

 How does a Michelin-starred meal such as Mugaritz in San Sebastián, Spain, stand up next to a humble seafood shack like Badjao Seafood House in Palawan, in the Philippines?

You can’t say that a meal at Mugaritz is any better than a meal at Badjao Seafood House. The fish and shellfish at Badjao rivals what’s at Mugaritz. It’s as well tended, and it’s as beautifully created. You’re talking about a culinary experience in a magical restaurant versus a transporting little place where you walk out on a dock and sit in this little bamboo hut perched out over the water. “Best” and “most interesting” are relative terms.

We noticed that you included Kau Kee restaurant in Hong Kong—a favorite among T+L staff. What made it worthy of your top 31?

I like to go to Kau Kee and sit there for about an hour and a half, and every half hour I’ll have a bowl of brisket and noodles. It’s the essential Hong Kong experience: you’re in an old restaurant that only does one thing, and it costs anywhere between $1.50 and $3 per bowl. The reason I sit there for an hour and a half is not because I want time to have six bowls of soup. It's so I can watch all of Hong Kong go by—neighbors, families, shop owners—right from those tables. These are the types of experiences that make travel so unique.

Jennifer FlowersJennifer Flowers is the Hotels & Food Editor at Travel + Leisure. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

Photo courtesy of Travel Channel

Hilton Launches New Brand: Curio

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Hilton Worldwide this week has announced the launch of a new hotel collection called Curio, a group of four- and five-star boutique properties that will maintain their unique identities while having access to Hilton’s resources, including the company’s robust Hilton HHonors loyalty program. While there are plans for Curio to have a global presence, the first five participating hotels are all stateside, including the highly-anticipated, soon-to-open SLS Las Vegas Hotel & Casino, the Sam Houston Hotel in Houston, the Hotel Alex Johnson in Rapid City, S.D., and the Franklin Hotel in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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Harlem Eat Up! Festival to launch in NYC May 2015

marcus_harlem_eat_upjpgWith all the notable restaurants opening in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood—Red Rooster and the Cecil, to name just two—it’s fast becoming a local foodie mecca. That’s why today’s announcement came as no surprise to many: Harlem Eat Up!, the area’s first-ever food festival in partnership with sponsors like EY (Ernst & Young) and non-profit groups such as Citymeals-on-Wheels (the main beneficiary), will launch this time next year.

On a balmy Wednesday afternoon, celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson gathered at his Red Rooster restaurant alongside supporters including New York City mayor Bill DeBlasio and former president Bill Clinton to make the announcement (check out the video above to hear president Clinton on the festival). Come May 15, 2015, we’re excited to eat ourselves silly, but we’re also way impressed with chef Samuelsson, who continues to do amazing things to boost this historic—but long-neglected—uptown neighborhood.

Jennifer FlowersJennifer Flowers is the Food and Hotels Editor at Travel + Leisure. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

 

Photos by Jennifer Flowers

Ritz-Carlton Rancho Mirage Opens

Ritz-Carlton Rancho Mirage

There’s a noteworthy new spot worth considering for your next weekend getaway. The Ritz-Carlton, Rancho Mirage, set on a bluff above Palm Springs and California’s Coachella Valley, has thrown open its doors again today after a seven-year closure (you can thank the financial crisis for the delayed debut).

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Four Seasons to Launch Private Jet

Four Seasons jet

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a… flying hotel? Come February 2015, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts will extend its hospitality into the skies and launch its very own branded private aircraft—the first of its kind in the industry. And we’re not talking about a tiny Learjet—this is a Boeing 757 with custom-designed interiors, 52 handcrafted leather flatbed seats, and Four Seasons-worthy onboard dining.

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