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The Dish on Lasse Halström's The Hundred-Foot Journey

201408-hd-the-hundred-foot-journeyjpg

Swedish director Lasse Hallström gives T+L the dish, as his latest release, The Hundred-Foot Journey, starring Helen Mirren, hits theaters.

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Opening: Denmark's Henne Kirkeby Kro Inn and Restaurant

Henne Kirkeby Kro

These days, you mostly hear about chefs in Copenhagen—not those who choose to leave. But in 2011, Paul Cunningham shuttered his Michelin-starred The Paul and headed to what he calls “Denmark’s wild West Coast,” turning the 200-year-old former coaching inn Henne Kirkeby Kro into a 12-table restaurant with five individually designed guest rooms. “It was the stress of city life,” he says. “I wanted something smaller, less mainstream.” Cunningham raises his own livestock, cultivates a kitchen garden, and serves whatever inspires him—from a simple, perfectly roasted lamb to langoustines with crushed tomato and garlic confit. Now he’s opened the first new building on the site in two centuries, Jægerhuset (hunters lodge). The seven rooms—including one named for Jóhannes Larsen, the renowned nature painter who vacationed here in the 19th century—are outfitted with pieces by iconic Danish designers (Hans Wegner; Finn Juhl). As for the handmade-brick exterior, Cunningham—ever the chef—likens it to blocks of nougatine. $$

Photo by Paul Cunningham

Travel Uniform: New York Restaurateur Will Guidara

Will Guidara

The New York restaurateur serves up his packing wisdom.

As co-owner of Manhattan’s Eleven Madison Park and NoMad restaurants (and co-author, with chef Daniel Humm, of the cookbook I Love NY, out in April), Will Guidara travels often—and light. “I can fit four days in my duffel,” he says. “Some people overpack because they’re scared of stains, but I’d rather just buy a new shirt!” When Guidara takes tasting trips—Hong Kong, London, and Copenhagen are on deck—he tends to head straight from plane to table. “It’s so flattering when people show up with luggage. It means your restaurant is the first thing they want to experience.”

• “My Victorinox jacket ($2,250) has tons of pockets for small items (like bags of Goldfish, my go-to travel snack).”

• “We serve Intelligentsia coffee at E.M.P.—the house blend from Colombia and Peru. It’s the best.”

• “I love my twill-and- leather Ghurka duffel ($995). My dad had the all-leather version.”

• “Breaking in A.P.C. jeans ($185) is worth it: they’re sturdy and durable.”

• “Even jeans look better with my Ferragamo moccasins ($440).”

Photo by Melanie Dunea

Q+A: Gael Garcia Bernal on Chile and Mexico

Gael Garcia Bernal

For his Academy Award-nominated film No, the Mexican star traveled to Santiago, Chile, to portray the young ad exec who helped oust General Augusto Pinochet in 1988. T+L caught up with the peripatetic actor.

Q: What stood out most about Chile?
A: It’s the only country where a dictator has been toppled democratically. A fantastic place to visit is the General Cemetery; the whole history is buried there and you can see how the classes are divided. And Chile faces the sea, so there’s a strong coastal culture.

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Q+A: Graydon Carter Re-Opens Beatrice Inn

Graydon Carter Q+A

Graydon Carter, the Vanity Fair editor-in-chief who moonlights as a restaurateur, has a Midas touch when it comes to reviving classic New York spots. He brought the Waverly Inn back to life in 2006, and Monkey Bar shortly thereafter. His latest transformation, with partners Emil Varda and Brett Rasinski: the West Village’s Beatrice Inn (285 W. 12th St.; $$$$), a 1950’s-era Italian restaurant turned nightclub turned chophouse. Here, Carter dishes on what it takes to succeed, the perfect sound track for eating steak, and more.

What to expect at the Beatrice Inn: This is downtown, so we don’t serve traditional huge steaks. Brian Nasworthy, a former Per Se sous-chef, runs the kitchen. There are a lot of salads—my wife demanded that.

Favorite New York chophouse: Keens Steakhouse (72 W. 36th St.; $$$). It was the hot place in the late 1800's, and it is still packed. The food is wonderful, and the drinks are hearty. I have the roast beef twice a year.

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Q&A: Director Fernando Meirelles

Fernando Meirelles

The Brazilian director is best known for his visually arresting films, such as 2002’s City of God, set in a Rio de Janeiro favela. His newest, 360, with Jude Law and Rachel Weisz, goes global. Shot in five different countries, it touches on the Arab Spring, euro crisis, and prostitution.

Q: You were filming on the road for almost 20 weeks. Any favorite hotels?
A:
We were in London for three months, so I rented an apartment. But I like Hazlitt’s Hotel ($$$). You get a key to the front door, and it’s like your own home. In Vienna, we stayed at the 25hours Hotel Wien (1-3 Lerchenfelder Str.; $). There are bicycles for guests, and the staff doesn’t wear uniforms. After a week or two, we were hanging out with the hotel crew.

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Q&A: Actress Greta Gerwig on Italy

Greta Gerwig

The former queen of mumblecore movies, Greta Gerwig, is now starring in such high-profile projects as Woody Allen’s To Rome with Love (out now). Here, her thoughts on truffles, art, and other Italian greats.

Q: Where did you stay while filming?
A: The cast stayed at the Parco dei Principi ($$$),near the far side of Villa Borghese. It was very fancy, but old-school, like seventies-style, which makes sense given Woody Allen. It was definitely built when you wanted to use as much chrome as you could get.

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Model Paulina Porizkova’s Favorite Travel Destinations

Paulina Porizkova

Paulina Porizkova—a star of photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders’s latest HBO documentary, About Face: The Supermodels Then and Now (airing July 30)—reveals her favorite destinations.

Paris: When I visit, I always go to the Jardin du Luxembourg and buy barbe à papa—cotton candy twice the size of your head. Sacré Coeur is another must. Walking up all those steps? Totally cliché, but I just love it.

St. Bart’s: My family and I have been going there for 28 years. The classic place to eat is Maya’s ($$$), for simple Creole-French food right on the water.

Kyoto: I shot an ice cream commercial in Japan when I was 16, but I’d never been to Kyoto until recently. We stayed at Hiiragiya ($$$), an inn run by the same family since 1818. Three generations waved goodbye to us as we left.

Photo by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

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