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Getting Around Rome

Rome is compact enough so that you can cover most distances on your own two (comfortably shod) feet. When that cobblestone reflexology gets to be too much, the city’s public transportation network is quite handy between most points of interest. For a really authentic experience, gutsy travelers can do as the Romans do and drive a motorino (scooter), available for rent at many agencies around town.• Public transportation: Rome’s network of buses, trams, and metro trains, run by ATAC (www.atac.roma.it), is comprehensive, though routes can be confusing for newcomers. A 75-minute ticket costs $1.50; full-day tickets are $6; three-day tickets are $16; and weekly tickets are $23. Tickets are sold at tabacchi shops (marked with a “T” and often inside coffee bars) and at most newsstands. Time-stamp your tickets as soon as you board to validate them. Buses and trams are the most scenic way to get around, but the metro is much faster for farther-flung destinations. Pickpockets love to work the public transportation routes, so always be vigilant about your valuables.Taxis: Cabs are plentiful in the center, but generally you cannot hail them on the street. By law, they’re required to pick up passengers from the queue at taxi stands, which are located at most major piazzas and monuments. You can also call to have a cab sent to you, although it can be impossible to find one at prime times and in the rain. Try 06-3570 (the largest network) first, then 06-4994, 06-4157, 06-6645, or 06-88177. Fares in the center are metered and usually run about $15 for a 15-minute ride.

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