Five Drinks That Will Cure Any Case of Jet Lag
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Five Drinks That Will Cure Any Case of Jet Lag

A girl sleeping on a suitcase
(c) Image Source
A girl sleeping on a suitcase
(c) Image Source

Being a frequent traveler has one vice: jet lag. What often starts as an urge for a quick nap, can lead to missed city tours and monument visits in a new time zone. The good news is that today's top health drink brewers just might have found some cures for the travel bug. These pros make daily batches of tonics, teas, and juices that are said to cure just about any ailment imaginable—from insomnia to...sexual dysfunctions. So for them, jet lag remedies are a piece of cake. Read on for their expert advice.

There's nothing like water.

"Keeping hydrated is key for overcoming jet lag and beating the dryness and bloating that often accompanies travel," says Whitney Tingle, cofounder of organic meal delivery service Sakara Life. Tingle recommends replacing complimentary dehydrating drinks like coffee, soda, and black tea with mineral-rich spring waters while on the plane. And if you plan to catch some zs, sip on the brand's Night Water before dozing off. The emerald-colored elixir contains chlorella, an ingredient known to detoxify your body and improve digestion. "You'll wake up refreshed and ready to take on the day—wherever in the world you may be," says Tingle. Best part? The 8-ounce bottles of Night Water are also small enough to tuck into your purse if you're on the go!

Plus: "Rosemary oil has been our secret travel weapon for years," says DuBoise, noting that the lesser-known essential oil is a wellness powerhouse known to relieve cramping and nausea, promote healthy digestion, aid in circulation, boost the immune system, and ease uncomfortable respiratory symptoms from recycled plane air. "Add a drop or two of the oil to a bottle of our Beauty Water," she says.

Have a tea party.

For Adriana Ayales, herbalist and founder of NYC-based apothecary Anima Mundi, there's no better cure for a case of jet lag than a blend of polysaccharide-rich adaptogens. "Adaptogens are an incredible class of hormone and blood sugar-regulating herbs that help to de-stress and harmonize the system on many levels," she says. "All adaptogens target five or more organs and are the safest herbs that you can consume—and they taste good too!" Ayales has created a cocktail of her favorite adaptogens in Anima Mundi JetLag tea ($14), including ashwagandha, maca, astragalus, and more, known for their immune supporting and de-stressing properties. (Plus, a touch of vanilla and cinnamon for a chai latte-taste.) "It's most beneficial to drink the adaptogens first thing in the morning for a cleansing effect and a boost of energy." Ayales recommends adding a spoonful to a cup of water, letting it steep for 15 minutes, and sipping it once it's cool enough to drink. 

Take a nap.

If you're traveling overnight, Amanda Chantal Bacon (founder of Moon Juice, the California-based holistic wellness brand) recommends using the long flight to catch up on well-deserved beauty sleep. "Get as much rest as possible so that when you arrive, you can set yourself to the current time zone," says Bacon. But put the pill bottle down, she warns. "Sleeping drugs—even melatonin—can leave you a bit foggy." Instead, she suggests opting for a calming, herbal nightcap that will lull you to sleep without the energy-draining chemicals that often lead to grogginess well after you land. Try mixing a teaspoon of Moon Juice Goodnight Dust into a cup of water before falling asleep. 

Plus, got milk? "Almonds calm and ground the nervous system, so wherever I land I go to a shop that has almond milk," says Bacon. "Drink a cup in the morning and in the evening for three days," she says, explaining that three days is the approximate amount of time it takes to de-stress your nervous system and acclimate to a new timetable. "If you're intentional about supporting your system for three days, your trip should be painless."

Do a shot.

"Your body's normal sleep and wake cycles are regulated by an internal system called circadian rhythms," says Marra St. Clair, co-author of The Juice Cleanse Reset Diet  and cofounder of California-based juice company Project Juice. "Unfortunately, these internal rhythms do not adjust when you cross into a new time zone, leaving you sleepy when you would like to be awake or vice-versa." And as all of the pros agree, long, dry flights don't help, causing migraines and dehydration. St. Clair's fix? One word: turmeric. "Turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory ingredient and will help you to avoid headaches when flying. I strongly encourage you to include raw turmeric in your diet on the days leading up to your travels—and in flight. I love our shots when travelling because they can be carried on the plane with you. (I literally take one of each when I fly!)" Try Project Juice Turmeric Tonic.

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