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Worst Medical Tourism Disasters

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Artpartner-images.com / Alamy

Traveling overseas for medical procedures is a growing industry—but is the cost savings worth the risk?

Fertility Treatments in Romania

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The Botch Job: A 45-year-old woman from Israel traveled to a Bucharest clinic for fertility treatments. According to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, Romanian authorities broke into a clinic in the middle of her procedure to arrest three of the clinic’s doctors who were allegedly running an illegal egg-trafficking business that involved overstimulating patients’ ovaries with drugs for extraction and sale on the black market. The woman was dragged out of the clinic by authorities immediately after her treatment ended.

The Real Deal: Egg trafficking is a big business in Eastern Europe and Israel, where fertility laws are looser than they are in Western Europe and the U.S., and where egg-trafficking schemes have scandalized a handful of fertility clinics.

Worst Medical Tourism Disasters

Fertility Treatments in Romania

The Botch Job: A 45-year-old woman from Israel traveled to a Bucharest clinic for fertility treatments. According to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, Romanian authorities broke into a clinic in the middle of her procedure to arrest three of the clinic’s doctors who were allegedly running an illegal egg-trafficking business that involved overstimulating patients’ ovaries with drugs for extraction and sale on the black market. The woman was dragged out of the clinic by authorities immediately after her treatment ended.

The Real Deal: Egg trafficking is a big business in Eastern Europe and Israel, where fertility laws are looser than they are in Western Europe and the U.S., and where egg-trafficking schemes have scandalized a handful of fertility clinics.

Artpartner-images.com / Alamy
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