World's Strangest Candy

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Courtesy of Toraya Confectionery Co.Ltd.

Put down the milk chocolate: When traveling, sample candies made with salt, chili, and mung beans.

Japan: Wagashi

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What it is: Nothings says indulgence like yams and bean paste—at least in Japan. These candies go back to ancient times, beginning with a legend about an emperor’s aide who committed suicide after failing to deliver a royal snack. Today the treats don’t look like any kind of candy, for the most part, but rather like sushi, or even rubber erasers.

How it tastes: Mildly sweet, usually; traditional Yokan wagashi has a jellied consistency.

Where to get it: Confectionary Toraya, with boutiques in Tokyo, Kyoto, and even a few counters in New York City and Paris. The boutiques’ spartan displays under glass counters make them look like jewelry stores, but a tiny box of jellied red-bean Yokan costs only a few dollars.

 

 

 

World's Strangest Candy

Japan: Wagashi

What it is: Nothings says indulgence like yams and bean paste—at least in Japan. These candies go back to ancient times, beginning with a legend about an emperor’s aide who committed suicide after failing to deliver a royal snack. Today the treats don’t look like any kind of candy, for the most part, but rather like sushi, or even rubber erasers.

How it tastes: Mildly sweet, usually; traditional Yokan wagashi has a jellied consistency.

Where to get it: Confectionary Toraya, with boutiques in Tokyo, Kyoto, and even a few counters in New York City and Paris. The boutiques’ spartan displays under glass counters make them look like jewelry stores, but a tiny box of jellied red-bean Yokan costs only a few dollars.

 

 

 

Courtesy of Toraya Confectionery Co.Ltd.
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