Helen Pickford

Mexico City

16 of 23

Risk Factor: very high

The Scene: Street-vendor permits do exist, but regulations are generally ignored and rarely enforced, so be advised: go with a guide or look for well-maintained carts with long lines around lunchtime (2 p.m.–4:30 p.m.)

Where to Go: Carts in the Centro Histórico’s Zócalo (the city’s main square), and those in the central Colonia Roma neighborhood.

What to Order: Tlacoyos (corn patties filled with fava or bayo beans and topped with queso blanco); quesadillas with squash flowers; rajas (charred poblano peppers and onions); quelites (wild greens); tacos al pastor with spit-roasted pork.

What to Avoid: Carne apache, ground beef “cooked” in lime juice; sliced, raw fruit or vegetables; shaved ice (where the water source is unknown).

Spotlight: One Day, Three Meals

Must-try dishes from guide Lesley Téllez of Eat Mexico.

Breakfast: Begin your day with esquites, a hearty dish of corn kernels stewed in a spicy, herb-filled broth, at the tianguis, an outdoor market held Tuesdays in Condesa. Intersection of Carretera Pachuca and Avda. Veracruz.

Lunch: Head to the cart on the corner of Delicias and Aranda streets in the historic center for blue-corn tlacoyos: grilled corn-dough patties filled with beans and cheese and topped with cactus, cilantro, and a drizzle of salsa.

Dinner: El Vilsito—an auto shop by day and food stand by night—serves tacos al pastor, small corn tortillas with sliced and caramelized po

World's Most Delicious Street Food

Mexico City

Risk Factor: very high

The Scene: Street-vendor permits do exist, but regulations are generally ignored and rarely enforced, so be advised: go with a guide or look for well-maintained carts with long lines around lunchtime (2 p.m.–4:30 p.m.)

Where to Go: Carts in the Centro Histórico’s Zócalo (the city’s main square), and those in the central Colonia Roma neighborhood.

What to Order: Tlacoyos (corn patties filled with fava or bayo beans and topped with queso blanco); quesadillas with squash flowers; rajas (charred poblano peppers and onions); quelites (wild greens); tacos al pastor with spit-roasted pork.

What to Avoid: Carne apache, ground beef “cooked” in lime juice; sliced, raw fruit or vegetables; shaved ice (where the water source is unknown).

Spotlight: One Day, Three Meals

Must-try dishes from guide Lesley Téllez of Eat Mexico.

Breakfast: Begin your day with esquites, a hearty dish of corn kernels stewed in a spicy, herb-filled broth, at the tianguis, an outdoor market held Tuesdays in Condesa. Intersection of Carretera Pachuca and Avda. Veracruz.

Lunch: Head to the cart on the corner of Delicias and Aranda streets in the historic center for blue-corn tlacoyos: grilled corn-dough patties filled with beans and cheese and topped with cactus, cilantro, and a drizzle of salsa.

Dinner: El Vilsito—an auto shop by day and food stand by night—serves tacos al pastor, small corn tortillas with sliced and caramelized po

Helen Pickford

World's Most Delicious Street Food

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