<a href="http://www.explorethebay.net/BASE/" class="external" rel="nofollow">Nick Fisher</a>

Abandoned Skunk Train, California

8 of 12

Why It’s Eerie: From Elk to Fort Bragg, Mendocino County’s Highway 1 is strewn with ghost barns and shuttered lumber plants, abandoned as redwood logging became illegal. In Fort Bragg, the rusty maintenance yard for the number 681 Skunk Train, which began operations in 1885, is the creepiest. Train employees who work late nights on the adjacent, newly restored and active Skunk Line claim that the ghost of C. R. Johnson, founder of the railroad, lurks in the old depot.

How to Experience It: Etta Wilder, who hosted many a Skunk Line train passenger at her rambling seaside farmstead, still haunts Little River’s Glendeven Inn (doubles from $150). Ask for one of the inn’s cemetery maps, and pay your respects at her gravesite.

World's Eeriest Abandoned Places

Abandoned Skunk Train, California

Why It’s Eerie: From Elk to Fort Bragg, Mendocino County’s Highway 1 is strewn with ghost barns and shuttered lumber plants, abandoned as redwood logging became illegal. In Fort Bragg, the rusty maintenance yard for the number 681 Skunk Train, which began operations in 1885, is the creepiest. Train employees who work late nights on the adjacent, newly restored and active Skunk Line claim that the ghost of C. R. Johnson, founder of the railroad, lurks in the old depot.

How to Experience It: Etta Wilder, who hosted many a Skunk Line train passenger at her rambling seaside farmstead, still haunts Little River’s Glendeven Inn (doubles from $150). Ask for one of the inn’s cemetery maps, and pay your respects at her gravesite.

Nick Fisher [1] http://www.explorethebay.net/BASE/"

World's Eeriest Abandoned Places

Explore More