The World’s Eleven Best Street Food Cities

Tortas cart Mexico City street food
Skip Ad
© dbimages / Alamy Stock Photo

From Singapore to Cartagena, these cities take street food to the next level of deliciousness. Here’s where to go and what to order.

Mexico City

8 of 12

The Scene: Street food in Mexico City dates back to pre-Hispanic times—the Spaniards were reportedly amazed to find an array of ready-to-eat food for sale on the streets when they arrived in 1516. Not much has changed since then: the streets still teem with carts and makeshift taquerias slinging fast, cheap, delicious eats. Food safety regulations do exist here, but are rarely enforced, so stick to well-maintained carts with long lines.

Where to Go: The Centro Histórico’s Zócalo abounds with street food, but some of the city’s best lies outside the main square. A five-minute walk south of the Zócalo, you’ll find the city’s finest tortas at Tortas Been at República del Salvador, while five minutes north of the Zócalo, you’ll find the city’s best pozole (a meat and hominy stew) on Calle San Ildefonso.

What to Order: Tortas de pierna (roast pork leg sandwich); pozole; rajas (charred poblano peppers and onions); tacos al pastor (small corn tortillas filled with spit-roasted pork).

Tortas cart Mexico City street food

The World’s Eleven Best Street Food Cities

Mexico City

The Scene: Street food in Mexico City dates back to pre-Hispanic times—the Spaniards were reportedly amazed to find an array of ready-to-eat food for sale on the streets when they arrived in 1516. Not much has changed since then: the streets still teem with carts and makeshift taquerias slinging fast, cheap, delicious eats. Food safety regulations do exist here, but are rarely enforced, so stick to well-maintained carts with long lines.

Where to Go: The Centro Histórico’s Zócalo abounds with street food, but some of the city’s best lies outside the main square. A five-minute walk south of the Zócalo, you’ll find the city’s finest tortas at Tortas Been at República del Salvador, while five minutes north of the Zócalo, you’ll find the city’s best pozole (a meat and hominy stew) on Calle San Ildefonso.

What to Order: Tortas de pierna (roast pork leg sandwich); pozole; rajas (charred poblano peppers and onions); tacos al pastor (small corn tortillas filled with spit-roasted pork).

© dbimages / Alamy Stock Photo
More from T+L
 
Advertisement