T+L’s Best New Restaurants: 2015 Edition

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Michael Persico

In 11 of the world’s most compelling food capitals, neo-traditionalists, upstart iconoclasts, and ingredient obsessives are setting new culinary standards.

Philadelphia

10 of 12

This unsung destination has blossomed into one of the U.S.’s most exciting restaurant cities—Portland East?—with a fierce indie spirit and world-class kitchen talent. Peter Serpico, a veteran of New York City's Momofuku Ko, wowed us at his namesake Serpico with asparagus in garlicky pecorino broth and the now-famous pig’s head with burnt-onion mustard. If it’s comfort food you’re after, Michael Solomonov and Steve Cook (whose Zahav and Federal Donuts revitalized Sansom Street) opened two adjacent places, both equally worthy of attention. Inspired by the hummusiyas of Israel, the color-splashed Dizengoff is where earthy chickpea purées reach the stratosphere—especially when topped with heirloom zucchini and za’atar. Next door at Abe Fisher, co-chef Yehuda Sichel spins deliciously irreverent riffs on the foods of the Jewish diaspora (“borscht” is a beet tartare garnished with jewel-like trout roe). Another New York transplant, Eli Kulp (formerly of Torrisi), made sparks with his remake of the Fork three years ago. High Street on Market is its relaxed, more experimental sibling—the artisanal breads and the caraway-rye rigatoni with pastrami ragù are reasons alone to go to Philly.

T+L’s Best New Restaurants: 2015 Edition

Philadelphia

This unsung destination has blossomed into one of the U.S.’s most exciting restaurant cities—Portland East?—with a fierce indie spirit and world-class kitchen talent. Peter Serpico, a veteran of New York City's Momofuku Ko, wowed us at his namesake Serpico with asparagus in garlicky pecorino broth and the now-famous pig’s head with burnt-onion mustard. If it’s comfort food you’re after, Michael Solomonov and Steve Cook (whose Zahav and Federal Donuts revitalized Sansom Street) opened two adjacent places, both equally worthy of attention. Inspired by the hummusiyas of Israel, the color-splashed Dizengoff is where earthy chickpea purées reach the stratosphere—especially when topped with heirloom zucchini and za’atar. Next door at Abe Fisher, co-chef Yehuda Sichel spins deliciously irreverent riffs on the foods of the Jewish diaspora (“borscht” is a beet tartare garnished with jewel-like trout roe). Another New York transplant, Eli Kulp (formerly of Torrisi), made sparks with his remake of the Fork three years ago. High Street on Market is its relaxed, more experimental sibling—the artisanal breads and the caraway-rye rigatoni with pastrami ragù are reasons alone to go to Philly.

Michael Persico
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