The World's Strangest Street Food

Skip Ad
© NORMA JOSEPH / Alamy

From stinky tofu to fried water beetles, find the soul of a destination through its sidewalk snacks.

Yak Butter Tea, Lhasa, Tibet

7 of 11

Thick, salty butter tea—called po cha in these parts—is more like a savory soup than the sweet tea known to Western palates. It's made by churning or shaking yak butter, black tea, and salt together in a covered container; the result is best consumed when it's hot and foamy. Locals usually drink dozens of cups a day; it's an easy source of calories, and more pressingly in these high altitudes, heat. It's also served in practically every Tibetan home—and if you're staying in one, you'd better develop a taste for the brew: Local custom dictates that a guest's cup should be refilled after every sip.

Where to Find It: Any of the many streetside tea shops around Jokhang temple in Lhasa's old Tibetan quarter.

From the article The World's Strangest Street Food

The World's Strangest Street Food

Yak Butter Tea, Lhasa, Tibet

Thick, salty butter tea—called po cha in these parts—is more like a savory soup than the sweet tea known to Western palates. It's made by churning or shaking yak butter, black tea, and salt together in a covered container; the result is best consumed when it's hot and foamy. Locals usually drink dozens of cups a day; it's an easy source of calories, and more pressingly in these high altitudes, heat. It's also served in practically every Tibetan home—and if you're staying in one, you'd better develop a taste for the brew: Local custom dictates that a guest's cup should be refilled after every sip.

Where to Find It: Any of the many streetside tea shops around Jokhang temple in Lhasa's old Tibetan quarter.

From the article The World's Strangest Street Food

© NORMA JOSEPH / Alamy
Sponsored Content
More from T+L
 
Advertisement