New Wonders of the World

Introducing the newest travel-inspiring sites added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List.

Landscape of Grand Pré, Canada

5 of 27

The archaeological remains in this bucolic setting testify to hardy European farmers who used dykes and the aboiteau wooden sluice system, a labor-intensive method that prevented saltwater tides from flooding the Pré marshland of Nova Scotia—one of the world’s most extreme tidal regions. The preserved area is more than 3,200 acres and was first developed by 17th-century Acadians of what was New France.

New Wonders of the World

Landscape of Grand Pré, Canada

The archaeological remains in this bucolic setting testify to hardy European farmers who used dykes and the aboiteau wooden sluice system, a labor-intensive method that prevented saltwater tides from flooding the Pré marshland of Nova Scotia—one of the world’s most extreme tidal regions. The preserved area is more than 3,200 acres and was first developed by 17th-century Acadians of what was New France.

UNESCO/ Francois Gaudet
Sponsored Content
Explore More
More from T+L
Advertisement