Twenty-One of the World’s Ultimate Luxury Vacations
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Twenty-One of the World’s Ultimate Luxury Vacations

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Tim McKenna/Courtesy of The Brando

The Brando

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Hollywood legend Marlon Brando bought the French Polynesian private island of Tetiaroa in the 1960s with an aim to preserve the beauty and biodiversity that he’d fallen in love with while filming Mutiny on the Bounty. Carrying on that legacy now is The Brando, a resort offering 35 luxury villas. Each lies on its own private beach with a plunge pool, outdoor dining area, and modern media room, while the property includes a spa, two restaurants, an organic garden, a tennis court, a library and cultural center, and an environmental research station. The Brando’s commitment to sustainability is one of the many reasons Betty Jo Currie of Currie & Co. Travels Unlimited recommends it, writing, “Not only does it hit all the marks for luxury... it is also cooling the villas with seawater and making compost from leftovers, which then fertilize the gardens. And they have a foundation on the island to protect the cultural history and future of the area—especially important in a society without a written language.”

Twenty-One of the World’s Ultimate Luxury Vacations

The Brando

Hollywood legend Marlon Brando bought the French Polynesian private island of Tetiaroa in the 1960s with an aim to preserve the beauty and biodiversity that he’d fallen in love with while filming Mutiny on the Bounty. Carrying on that legacy now is The Brando, a resort offering 35 luxury villas. Each lies on its own private beach with a plunge pool, outdoor dining area, and modern media room, while the property includes a spa, two restaurants, an organic garden, a tennis court, a library and cultural center, and an environmental research station. The Brando’s commitment to sustainability is one of the many reasons Betty Jo Currie of Currie & Co. Travels Unlimited recommends it, writing, “Not only does it hit all the marks for luxury... it is also cooling the villas with seawater and making compost from leftovers, which then fertilize the gardens. And they have a foundation on the island to protect the cultural history and future of the area—especially important in a society without a written language.”

Tim McKenna/Courtesy of The Brando
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