Las Vegas's Best Restaurants

 Joël Robuchon, Las Vegas
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T+L tours Sin City to find Las Vegas’s best restaurants.

Joël Robuchon

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Joël Robuchon is located at the MGM Grand, though it does its best not to appear so: guests are picked up by limousine, delivered to a private entrance of the MGM’s exclusive Mansion annex, and escorted through rear corridors, Goodfellas-style, to the sumptuous, 50-seat dining room. Swathed in regal purples and golds, the interior is like a set from Die Zauberflöte. Surprisingly, it is the furthest thing from stiff.

Robuchon’s 16-course tasting menu costs $385 a person. As at so many Michelin three-stars, the opening courses are the standouts, their daintiness and concision whispering a whole evening’s worth of promise: a tin of osetra caviar hiding a layer of crabmeat and fennel cream; airy egg-yolk ravioli with chanterelles and spinach foam. Pairings are equally assured. A minerally white burgundy from Méo-Camuzet drinks beautifully with roasted lobster and sea-urchin flan.

Even the bread cart is amazing, laden with saffron focaccia, Gruyère brioche, olive flutes—plus a nearly five-pound slab of butter, flown in from Brittany.

 

 Joël Robuchon, Las Vegas

Las Vegas's Best Restaurants

Joël Robuchon

Joël Robuchon is located at the MGM Grand, though it does its best not to appear so: guests are picked up by limousine, delivered to a private entrance of the MGM’s exclusive Mansion annex, and escorted through rear corridors, Goodfellas-style, to the sumptuous, 50-seat dining room. Swathed in regal purples and golds, the interior is like a set from Die Zauberflöte. Surprisingly, it is the furthest thing from stiff.

Robuchon’s 16-course tasting menu costs $385 a person. As at so many Michelin three-stars, the opening courses are the standouts, their daintiness and concision whispering a whole evening’s worth of promise: a tin of osetra caviar hiding a layer of crabmeat and fennel cream; airy egg-yolk ravioli with chanterelles and spinach foam. Pairings are equally assured. A minerally white burgundy from Méo-Camuzet drinks beautifully with roasted lobster and sea-urchin flan.

Even the bread cart is amazing, laden with saffron focaccia, Gruyère brioche, olive flutes—plus a nearly five-pound slab of butter, flown in from Brittany.

 

Coral Von Zumwalt
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