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Great Barrier Reef

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Australia’s legendary coral ecosystem—roughly the size of Japan—may disappear
by 2030. The Australian Conservation Foundation claims that a rise in ocean temperatures of just
3–5 degrees Fahrenheit, combined with more acidic water, could leave 97 percent of the Great
Barrier Reef bleached and lifeless. To help reefs worldwide, explorer and author Dr. Sylvia Earle
recommends watching sea life swim in the ocean rather than ordering it sautéed in butter and
lemon. “For every 10 pounds [of seafood] that goes to market, another 10 pounds, even 100
pounds gets thrown away,” she says.

How to See It Now: Measure, tag, and save the wildlife of the Great Barrier
Reef with Intrepid Travel.

Fastest Disappearing Natural Wonders

Great Barrier Reef

Australia’s legendary coral ecosystem—roughly the size of Japan—may disappear
by 2030. The Australian Conservation Foundation claims that a rise in ocean temperatures of just
3–5 degrees Fahrenheit, combined with more acidic water, could leave 97 percent of the Great
Barrier Reef bleached and lifeless. To help reefs worldwide, explorer and author Dr. Sylvia Earle
recommends watching sea life swim in the ocean rather than ordering it sautéed in butter and
lemon. “For every 10 pounds [of seafood] that goes to market, another 10 pounds, even 100
pounds gets thrown away,” she says.

How to See It Now: Measure, tag, and save the wildlife of the Great Barrier
Reef with Intrepid Travel.

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Fastest Disappearing Natural Wonders

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