Robbie Shone / Alamy

The Arctic Ice Shelf

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Louise Allard, the first Australian woman to make it to the North Pole, in 2006, recalls many
perilous fissures of open water and dangerously thin ice along her journey and jokes that if she
had waited a few years she could have been the first woman to water-ski to the North Pole. NASA
climate scientist Tom Wagner estimates that the Arctic will be ice free in the coming
decades—and Arctic nations are banking on it, with people building warm-water ports and oil
companies preparing for exploration. There’s even talk about using it as a transportation
route.

How to See It Now: Forgo the helicopter shuttle to True North and embark on a
nine-day cross-country ski expedition with Icetrek
Expeditions
.

Fastest Disappearing Natural Wonders

The Arctic Ice Shelf

Louise Allard, the first Australian woman to make it to the North Pole, in 2006, recalls many
perilous fissures of open water and dangerously thin ice along her journey and jokes that if she
had waited a few years she could have been the first woman to water-ski to the North Pole. NASA
climate scientist Tom Wagner estimates that the Arctic will be ice free in the coming
decades—and Arctic nations are banking on it, with people building warm-water ports and oil
companies preparing for exploration. There’s even talk about using it as a transportation
route.

How to See It Now: Forgo the helicopter shuttle to True North and embark on a
nine-day cross-country ski expedition with Icetrek
Expeditions
.

Robbie Shone / Alamy

Fastest Disappearing Natural Wonders

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