Exploring the Real Majorca: Rugged, Rustic, and Steeped in Tradition
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Exploring the Real Majorca: Rugged, Rustic, and Steeped in Tradition

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Anne Dokter

Look beyond the Spanish island's mega-resorts and packed beaches and you’ll find historic hillside hotels, rustic seaside villages, and a surprisingly cosmopolitan capital city.

Es Capdellà and Sant Elm

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The one reason to go to the western mountain village of Es Capdellà is Castell Son Claret, the newest of Majorca’s antique castle makeovers. Everything about the place is designed to impress: the neo-Moorish crenellations of the 19th-century manor, the glassy pool, and the vast garden of herbs, olive trees, and blue agapanthus. When the hotel opened, in 2013, Madrid- based chef Francisco Pérez Arellano moved his Zaranda restaurant here and began applying his studied, haute-cuisine technique to the local ingredients. On my first night, I had a four-course meal that included stuffed loin of rabbit with crunchy snails and spinach. I still dream of the dessert box, with its cinnamon-dusted custard tarts.

Exploring the Real Majorca: Rugged, Rustic, and Steeped in Tradition

Es Capdellà and Sant Elm

The one reason to go to the western mountain village of Es Capdellà is Castell Son Claret, the newest of Majorca’s antique castle makeovers. Everything about the place is designed to impress: the neo-Moorish crenellations of the 19th-century manor, the glassy pool, and the vast garden of herbs, olive trees, and blue agapanthus. When the hotel opened, in 2013, Madrid- based chef Francisco Pérez Arellano moved his Zaranda restaurant here and began applying his studied, haute-cuisine technique to the local ingredients. On my first night, I had a four-course meal that included stuffed loin of rabbit with crunchy snails and spinach. I still dream of the dessert box, with its cinnamon-dusted custard tarts.

Anne Dokter
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