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Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Panasonic

Panasonic Lumix G1

Pros: The first digital camera with inter-changeable lenses that has the precision of a professional-grade (12.1-megapixel) SLR model. Plus, it’s super-compact.

Cons: It runs through the battery quickly (we took only 250 shots over the course of three days before the camera died).

Bottom Line Great for both professionals and amateurs. panasonic.com; $800.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Fujifilm

Fujifilm Finepix Z33WP

Pros: Waterproof up to 10 feet, this 10-megapixel digicam automatically tags your subjects and has an in-camera tool for uploading images to the Internet.

Cons: The camcorder feature takes footage that’s good enough for the Web, but not much else.

Bottom Line: A waterproof, 10-megapixel, full-featured camera at this price is a steal. fujifilmusa.com; $200.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Sony

Sony DSC-G3 Cyber-Shot

Pros: A 10.1-megapixel dual-purpose camera with built-in wireless; it lets you upload images and videos to online sharing services such as Flickr from any Wi-Fi hotspot.

Cons: The touch screen isn’t always responsive, and the Wi-Fi setup can be confusing, even for a techie.

Bottom Line: High-quality images combined with the convenience of uploading without a laptop or external hard drive. sonystyle.com; $500.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

James Wojcik

HP Mini 1000 MI Edition

Pros: This 10.3-by-6-inch netbook has a fast start-up because of its Linux operating system, and the on-screen tabs for mail, music, and movies make for easy navigation.

Cons: It’s difficult to type quickly on the keyboard, and the custom interface may turn off purists who like their Windows the traditional way.

Bottom Line: Impressive performance at a great price. hp.com; $425.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Dell, Inc.

Adamo by Dell

Pros: Though not technically a netbook, this pint-size 13.4-inch laptop almost competes in the category; it has an aluminum-and-glass casing, a high-resolution screen, and a dual-core processor for speed.

Cons: For the sake of slimness, the Adamo forgoes many features you’d expect from a laptop, such as a built-in memory-card slot and a DVD drive.

Bottom Line: This is the first PC that comes close to the simplicity and stylishness of a Mac. adamobydell.com; $1,999.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Samsung

Samsung NC10 Mini Notebook

Pros: Despite a compact 10.2-inch screen, the nearly full-size keyboard is a typist’s dream.

Cons: The actual netbook is slightly bigger than other models and lacks a built-in broadband modem.

Bottom Line: Our pick for those who work on the road but don’t want to lug around a full-size office laptop. samsung.com; $439.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Sony

Sony Vaio P Series Lifestyle PC

Pros: At 9.65 by 4.72 inches, it’s the smallest of all the netbooks and slim enough to fit in a jacket pocket. Its oblong shape is stylish, too.

Cons: The built-in pointer stick that serves as a mouse is almost impossible to control, so you’ll need to add a real mouse to make this work.

Bottom Line: The VAIO has drawbacks owing to its diminutive size, but its portability and sleek design can’t be beat. sonystyle.com; $900.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Palm, Inc.

Palm Pre

Pros: Though smaller than a BlackBerry, the Pre still has a big, iPhone-esque screen, a real keyboard, and excellent high-speed Wi-Fi that can locate a restaurant on Google Maps when you type in just a few letters.

Cons: The keyboard is more cramped than the BlackBerry’s, and for now, the number of cool applications pales in comparison with what’s available for the iPhone.

Bottom Line: An ideal fusion between the business- and e-mail-ready BlackBerry and the fun-loving iPhone (minus the apps). palm.com; price unavailable at press time.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of T-Mobile USA

T-Mobile G1

Pros: It’s the first phone to use Google’s new Android operating system, which includes a set of free apps that will soon rival that of the iPhone—Wikitude uses the G1’s GPS to find hotels, eateries, and activities near your current location.

Cons: You’ll need an adapter if you want to listen to music with your own headphones, and the “missed call” indicator is bizarrely complicated.

Bottom Line: The design is bulky, but the Android OS has a big future—if possible, hold out for an updated model, bound to come out later this year. t-mobileg1.com; $180.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

<center>Best Travel Gadgets of 2009</center>

Courtesy of Blackberry

BlackBerry Curve 8900 Smartphone

Pros: All the latest BlackBerry features in a slimmer, half-inch-thick package. Bonus: calls are transmitted via the Internet whenever you’re in a Wi-Fi hotspot, saving you minutes (or roaming charges when abroad).

Cons: Surfing the Web is slower than on the iPhone. And it’s currently only available on T-Mobile (Verizon Wireless, Sprint, and AT&T service is expected in a few months).

Bottom Line: If you need your cell to double as a work PDA, the Curve is your best bet. blackberry.com; $200.



Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

See the slideshow: Best Travel Gadgets of 2009

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