Best Places to Travel in 2016

People relaxing at Aarhus river at dusk
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Thomas Winz

The 50 biggest, buzziest destinations to visit this year include France’s new culture hub, a revived Hawaiian hideaway, and Mexico’s next great arts city.

17. Aarhus, Denmark

42 of 51

Denmark’s second city rarely gets a moment in the limelight, since its big sister Copenhagen takes much of the glory. But Aarhus, the picturesque canal town on the east coast of the Jutland peninsula, is shining this year, particularly on the culinary front. Chef Wassim Hallal has been at the forefront of a growing enthusiasm for delicious and technically advanced Nordic cooking that’s been sweeping the city. His restaurant, Frederikshøj (star dish: smoked oysters with bone marrow), along with restaurants Gastromé and Substans, were awarded the first Michelin stars in Denmark outside Copenhagen, and the trio is part of a rapidly evolving scene that’s seeing a raft of exciting newcomers. Other openings include Restaurant Domestic, a Jutland-produce-only outlet from four local influencers, and the upcoming outpost of Mikkeller, the microbrewery bar from Copenhagen. With this culinary revolution, plus innovative architecture (Olafur Eliasson’s rainbow-colored walkway atop the ARoS museum), some major regeneration along the waterfront, and the city’s upcoming tenure as one of two European Capitals of Culture in 2017, all the necessary ingredients are in place for Aarhus to become the next big European destination. —Emily Mathieson

People relaxing at Aarhus river at dusk

Best Places to Travel in 2016

17. Aarhus, Denmark

Denmark’s second city rarely gets a moment in the limelight, since its big sister Copenhagen takes much of the glory. But Aarhus, the picturesque canal town on the east coast of the Jutland peninsula, is shining this year, particularly on the culinary front. Chef Wassim Hallal has been at the forefront of a growing enthusiasm for delicious and technically advanced Nordic cooking that’s been sweeping the city. His restaurant, Frederikshøj (star dish: smoked oysters with bone marrow), along with restaurants Gastromé and Substans, were awarded the first Michelin stars in Denmark outside Copenhagen, and the trio is part of a rapidly evolving scene that’s seeing a raft of exciting newcomers. Other openings include Restaurant Domestic, a Jutland-produce-only outlet from four local influencers, and the upcoming outpost of Mikkeller, the microbrewery bar from Copenhagen. With this culinary revolution, plus innovative architecture (Olafur Eliasson’s rainbow-colored walkway atop the ARoS museum), some major regeneration along the waterfront, and the city’s upcoming tenure as one of two European Capitals of Culture in 2017, all the necessary ingredients are in place for Aarhus to become the next big European destination. —Emily Mathieson

Thomas Winz
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