America's Snobbiest Cities

Which locals hold their noses highest in the air? Travel + Leisure readers crowned snobbiest cities in America—and, admittedly, they have good reason to be proud.

No. 7 Dallas

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After a few years of somehow dodging the snobby top 10, Big D reminds readers what old-school attitude is about: this is a city where right-of-way is determined by blue-book value, and the stereotypically well-coiffed locals struck readers as the opposite of quirky. Staying at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek, or shopping at NorthPark’s Neiman-Marcus have long been hallmarks of good Dallas living. The new generation of Ewings might also be found at downtown boutique hotel The Joule, which just got three new penthouse suites, a tasteful Taschen library that does a weekly champagne afternoon tea, and Texas’s first imported-from-Europe ESPA spa. Readers gave Dallas credit for backing up its attitude with world-class museums and theaters, including the Rem Koolhaas-designed Wyly Theatre.

America's Snobbiest Cities

No. 7 Dallas

After a few years of somehow dodging the snobby top 10, Big D reminds readers what old-school attitude is about: this is a city where right-of-way is determined by blue-book value, and the stereotypically well-coiffed locals struck readers as the opposite of quirky. Staying at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek, or shopping at NorthPark’s Neiman-Marcus have long been hallmarks of good Dallas living. The new generation of Ewings might also be found at downtown boutique hotel The Joule, which just got three new penthouse suites, a tasteful Taschen library that does a weekly champagne afternoon tea, and Texas’s first imported-from-Europe ESPA spa. Readers gave Dallas credit for backing up its attitude with world-class museums and theaters, including the Rem Koolhaas-designed Wyly Theatre.

Courtesy The Joule Dallas
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