Courtesy of Falls Village Inn

Love is always in the air at these romantic hotels from coast to coast.

Falls Village Inn, Falls Village, CT

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Rumor has it that the Falls Village Inn was once a brothel. Two years ago, when Susan Sweetapple and Colin Chambers bought the dilapidated 1834 property in Litchfield County, garish flocked wallpaper lined a warren of unused upstairs rooms. Happily, the fledgling innkeepers found a godmother: the celebrated interior designer Bunny Williams lives down the road and offered her decorating services gratis. Williams is known for providing a place to put your feet up and your drink down. For the inn’s two rooms and two suites, she selected patterned quilts and coverlets, botanical prints, and crisp linen upholstery. New bathrooms with graphic black-and-white tiles were carved out of closets. (But hold out for the Green Room if you want an actual tub. Doesn’t anybody take a bath anymore?) The dining room showcases the canvases of local artists, and casual table coverings are ripped from a fat roll of brown butcher paper. It takes a village to feed the crowds here: hamburgers are made from the grass-fed beef of nearby Whippoorwill Farm; carrot cake is supplied by a busboy’s mother; and on Fridays, weather permitting, a retired helicopter pilot from Sharon, CT, brings in 30 squirming specimens from Rosie the Lobster Lady. The Appalachian Trail is right outside the door, ready for snowshoeing, and the cascading falls that give the town its name are a short hike away. But Falls Village has an almost defiantly laid-back personality, conducive to indulgent sloth and going off the grid—cell-phone reception is virtually nonexistent. Main Street commerce consists of a country store, which holds Saturday open-mike nights for native talent, and Toymakers Café, which used to sell hardware but now pushes sweet-potato waffles. (The breakfast menu is divided into “indulgences,” “classics,” and “fast.”)

Price Tag: Doubles from $199; thefallsvillageinn.com.

—Aimee Lee Ball

America's Most Romantic Hotels

Falls Village Inn, Falls Village, CT

Rumor has it that the Falls Village Inn was once a brothel. Two years ago, when Susan Sweetapple and Colin Chambers bought the dilapidated 1834 property in Litchfield County, garish flocked wallpaper lined a warren of unused upstairs rooms. Happily, the fledgling innkeepers found a godmother: the celebrated interior designer Bunny Williams lives down the road and offered her decorating services gratis. Williams is known for providing a place to put your feet up and your drink down. For the inn’s two rooms and two suites, she selected patterned quilts and coverlets, botanical prints, and crisp linen upholstery. New bathrooms with graphic black-and-white tiles were carved out of closets. (But hold out for the Green Room if you want an actual tub. Doesn’t anybody take a bath anymore?) The dining room showcases the canvases of local artists, and casual table coverings are ripped from a fat roll of brown butcher paper. It takes a village to feed the crowds here: hamburgers are made from the grass-fed beef of nearby Whippoorwill Farm; carrot cake is supplied by a busboy’s mother; and on Fridays, weather permitting, a retired helicopter pilot from Sharon, CT, brings in 30 squirming specimens from Rosie the Lobster Lady. The Appalachian Trail is right outside the door, ready for snowshoeing, and the cascading falls that give the town its name are a short hike away. But Falls Village has an almost defiantly laid-back personality, conducive to indulgent sloth and going off the grid—cell-phone reception is virtually nonexistent. Main Street commerce consists of a country store, which holds Saturday open-mike nights for native talent, and Toymakers Café, which used to sell hardware but now pushes sweet-potato waffles. (The breakfast menu is divided into “indulgences,” “classics,” and “fast.”)

Price Tag: Doubles from $199; thefallsvillageinn.com.

—Aimee Lee Ball

Courtesy of Falls Village Inn

America's Most Romantic Hotels

Imagine you and your better half cuddling fireside as the sun dips behind the distant mountains. The only sounds are from the wild; the only sights are canyons and the stark desert. No, you’re not in the Sahara. You’re at Utah’s ultra-romantic Amangiri resort.

With Valentine’s Day looming and no end to winter in sight, who doesn’t dream of stealing away on vacation? But you don’t need to travel to the ends of the earth (or beloved spots like Paris or the Caribbean) to find that spark-kindling setting. From seaside New England to Washington State’s wine country, we’ve uncovered dreamy properties certain to get you in the mood—whatever your idea of romance and your price range.

Related: America's Most Romantic Winter Destinations

You can take your love to literal new heights at Big Sur’s Post Ranch Inn, a cliff-top hotel whose treehouses and cottages perch a thousand feet above the Pacific. The policy of no clocks or televisions encourages couples to reconnect, while perks like a gratis convertible inspire drives along scenic Highway 1 with impromptu picnics on any of the breathtaking beaches.

Of course, romance doesn’t require endless water views; cozying up in a country bed-and-breakfast has its own appeal. Hillside Victorian cottages with a white picket fence and fairy-tale-like setting draw couples year round to Landrum, SC, where they check into the affordable Red Horse Inn. Blame its high occupancy rate on the waterfalls, rocking chairs, and in-room candlelit dinners.

Related: 50 Best Romantic Getaways 2010

Great country inns know just how to take care of their guests, and indeed many of our favorite romantic hotels are a quick jaunt but worlds away from major cities. It’s about a two-hour drive from Phoenix to an enchanting resort of adobe suites with kiva fireplaces set among the red-rock canyons of Sedona, while 2 1/2 hours gets you from Atlanta to a Blue Ridge Mountains retreat.

And sometimes, romance is just a subway ride away. Lovebirds who want to fall in love with their hometown all over again—or flock to a hotel with urban sophistication—can look no further than actor Robert De Niro’s Greenwich Hotel in New York City.

Read on to find the perfect romantic hotel for you two and make that daydreamed getaway a reality.

—Stephanie Orma

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