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<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

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National Park: Glacier, Montana

Disney’s not just for kids. Adventures by Disney (eight-day trips from $2,439 per person) offers adults-only itineraries to national parks throughout North America, including a new eight-day excursion (September 5–12) through Montana’s Glacier National Park (and into Canada’s Banff National Park). The trip offers a range of adrenaline-pumping activities, including rafting Class III rapids on Montana’s Flathead River and summiting Alberta’s 7,500-foot Sulphur Mountain.

—Bree Sposato



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009
<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

iStock

Road Trip: Savannah to Charleston

The Itinerary: Southerners live by their stomachs, and nowhere more so than in the low country of coastal South Carolina and Georgia—a simple two-day getaway.

Day One: Savannah to Beaufort (51 miles). Start things out right at Mrs. Wilkes’ Dining Room (lunch for two $32), where down-home goodness is served from 11 a.m. sharp each day: platters of fried chicken, vegetables swathed in bacon grease, and tufts of mashed sweet potatoes. Make your way north to SC 170, then on to SC 46 east, ending up in walkable Bluffton, South Carolina, a celebration of small-town Southern life. Be sure to stop by the Bluffton Oyster Factory, where you can watch Gullah women hand-shuck buckets of briny May River bounty. For dinner, head to Pepper’s Porch (dinner for two $42) for a Low Country Boil, served under ghostly Spanish moss tresses. Spend the night in Beaufort at the 190-year-old Great Value Rhett House Inn (doubles from $139, including breakfast), an antebellum plantation manse one block from the Intercoastal Waterway.

Day Two: Beaufort to Charleston (134 miles). Hop on Highway 17, making a stop at Wood Brothers, a general store that will sell you a pouch of boiled peanuts (the unofficial state snack) for the hour-long drive to Wadmalaw Island. Follow 17, turning right onto Main Road and then onto Maybank Highway. Once you’re riverside, pull into P.M. King’s Grocery for ribs or a freshly made shrimp-salad sandwich. After lunch, tour the

<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Courtesy of C. Lefebvre, Left Foot Charley

Wine Region: Leelanau and Old Mission Peninsulas, Michigan

Why Go Now: Flanking West Grand Traverse Bay, in the state’s Lower Peninsula, these 850 acres of vineyards are finally turning out wines, particularly Pinot Blancs, worthy of the stupendous views. Among the best: bracing renditions from Left Foot Charley and Brys Estate.

Stay: Great Value Check in to the stately eight-room inn at the hillside Black Star Farms (doubles from $225).

Eat: Try the roast quail stuffed with foie gras at Blu (dinner for two $110), overlooking Lake Michigan.



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009
<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Reena Bammi

Great Neighborhood: Boston’s North End

When Boston’s “Big Dig” replaced the elevated highway, it reconnected downtown to the isolated North End peninsula, bringing fresh energy to the city’s oldest residential neighborhood.

Eat: Located in the same curved red-brick building since 1926, Pizzeria Regina (dinner for two $16) is old-school pizza pie, with a fire brick–baked crust ordered light, regular, or well done. The melanzane alla parmigiana at Trattoria Il Panino (dinner for two $100) is stacked so high it resembles an eggplant angel food cake. At the tiny Neptune Oyster (dinner for two $110), Olives alum Jeff Nace presides over the freshest local seafood, including an impeccable raw bar, complemented by a compact but brilliant wine list. Fellow Olives vet Torri Crowell packs a mean lunch at the low-key Volle Nolle (lunch for two $25), offering skillfully constructed sandwiches like Cuban-style pulled pork on grilled brioche. The romantic Carmen Wine Bar & Trattoria (dinner for two $80) has an expansive list of fine Italian wines to accompany the full-flavored rustic specialties, like briny clams and earthy braised fennel in pebbly, house-made mustard-spiked cream sauce. Linger at neighborhood cafés over desserts like Florentine ricotta cannoli at Boston institution Mike’s Pastry (dessert for two $6).

Shop: Judy and Joy Catuogno, the twin-sister curators behind

<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Courtesy of REI Adventures

National Park: Capitol Reef, Utah

This 242,000-acre expanse of stunning burnt-orange cliffs and canyons in southwestern Utah didn’t appear on U.S. maps until 1872. Since then it’s served as the backdrop for dozens of westerns, but it remains largely unexplored. Enter REI (seven-day trips from $1,799 per person), which has just launched a trip that takes you from the dramatic domes lining Waterpocket Fold, a 100-mile scar in the earth’s crust, to Cassidy Arch, and, adjacent to the park, the five stacked sandstone terraces that form the Grand Staircase National Monument.

—Bree Sposato



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009
<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Richard T. Nowitz / Corbis

Beach Town: Chincoteague, Virginia

Chincoteague, a seven-mile-long island just off the Virginia coast, feels like the land that time forgot. The gateway to the 37-mile-long Assateague Island National Seashore—a nature refuge that’s home to wild ponies, herons, woodpeckers, and foxes—is only accessible via car over the Route 175 swing-span bridge.

Stay: A Victorian-era house has been turned into Miss Molly’s Inn, a seven-room B&B that offers high tea in the afternoons. Doubles from $140, including breakfast.

Eat: Known for clam chowder and platters of fried Atlantic shrimp and Chincoteague oysters, the Seashell Café hits the spot after a long day of beachcombing. Dinner for two $65.

—Tom Austin



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009
<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

iStock

Beach Town: Santa Cruz, California

Anyone who remembers 1987’s camp vampire classic Lost Boys will recognize this location, where the Giant Dipper roller coaster at the Beach Boardwalk amusement park was used to great scenic effect. In real life, Santa Cruz has plenty of other attractions: Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, the Santa Cruz Surfing Museum, surfers at Pleasure Point, and cavorting seals at Natural Bridges State Beach.

Stay: At the waterfront Casablanca Inn, 32 of the 33 rooms have ocean views (and a handful have fireplaces, for when the nights get chilly). The restaurant, open for dinner only, looks out on the vast expanse of the Pacific. Doubles from $175.

Eat: Center Street Grill is the place for salads, pastas, made-from-scratch hollandaise sauce, ahi tuna, and freshly squeezed lemonade and orange juice on the outdoor patio. Dinner for two $52.

—Tom Austin



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009
<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Courtesy of Llama Trips in Yellowstone

National Park: Yellowstone, Wyoming

Bypass the crowds at Old Faithful and head to Yellowstone’s best kept secret: the quiet Bechler region, in the southwest corner. The most unexpected way to discover its dozens of waterfalls and hidden thermal spouts is on a customized camping expedition with Llama Trips in Yellowstone (from $250 per person per day), a husband-and-wife-owned operator that will have you soaking in a hot pool at the base of a 150-foot waterfall and observing the area’s wildlife (moose, black bears, bald eagles) up close—though not too close. Gentle llamas, indigenous to the region, carry all of your equipment.

—Bree Sposato



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009
<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Jessica Schwartzberg

Road Trip: Adirondacks

The Itinerary: New York’s largest state park seems to go on forever. But the south-central area—with its petite mountains and high-end camps—is easily explored in three days.

Day One: Albany to Chestertown (79 miles). Starting in the state capital, head north 78 miles on I-87, then take exit 25 and follow Route 8 to the waterfront Fern Lodge (doubles from $275, including breakfast), an updated wilderness-style retreat. After a boat tour of Friends Lake, head down the road for dinner at Friends Lake Inn (dinner for two $95), known for its farm-to-table menu and 18,000-plus-bottle wine cellar.

Day Two: Chestertown to Newcomb to Blue Mountain Lake (60 miles). After breakfast on the inn’s screened porch, go canoeing or swimming, then point yourself toward North Creek for a freshly made panino at Café Sarah (lunch for two $17). Spend the rest of the afternoon exploring Great Camp Santanoni, an 1892 estate on Newcomb Lake that’s accessible by foot, bike, or horse-drawn wagon. You’ll see one of the High Peaks in the distance. The night’s lodgings are at the informal fishing camp–style Great Value Hedges (doubles from $205, including breakfast and dinner).

Day Three: Blue Mountain Lake to Raquette Lake to Albany (138 miles).

Drive to nearby Raquette Lake and visit the National Historic Landmark Great Camp Sagamore, the Vanderbilts’ fairy-tale lodge. Then embark on a Gilded Age ex

<center>America's Best Summer Getaways 2009</center>

Courtesy of Alaska Wildland Adventures

National Park: Kenai Fjords, Alaska

This remote swath along the southern coast of Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula is home to glaciers and fjords, puffins and porpoises—and now an upscale hotel. Accessible only by boat, Alaska Wildland Adventures’Kenai Fjords Glacier Lodge (doubles from $950) is a collection of 16 comfortably rustic log cabins set on a 1,700-acre wildlife sanctuary owned by Alutiiq natives. Here, the park is literally your backyard.

—Bree Sposato



America's Best Summer Getaways 2009

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