America's Best Farmers' Markets
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America's Best Farmers' Markets

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Courtesy of the Neighborhood Farmers Market Alliance

Big buildings and heavy traffic don’t preclude tasting regional produce, supporting small farms, and eating like a local.

University District Farmers’ Market,Seattle

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The Spread: Seattle claimed the No. 1 spot for farmers’ markets in our annual America’s Favorite Cities survey, so it’s no surprise to find one of the country’s best single markets as well. On Saturdays, 60-odd growers and procurers gather in the University Heights Community Center playground to sell their wares—which all come from within Washington State. Award-winning chefs like Maria Hines and Jerry Traunfeld (of Poppy) are often seen stocking up here on seafood like Alaskan spot prawns and tiny Pacific oysters; cuts of heavily marbled Mangalitsa pork; and foraged edible plants from the state’s deep, wet forests—including fiddlehead ferns, stinging nettles, and morels.

Most Unusual Find: Ozette potatoes—thin-skinned, lumpy fingerlings that were cultivated by Makah Pacific Coast Native Americans 200 years ago—from Full Circle Farm in nearby Carnation.

America's Best Farmers' Markets

University District Farmers’ Market,Seattle

The Spread: Seattle claimed the No. 1 spot for farmers’ markets in our annual America’s Favorite Cities survey, so it’s no surprise to find one of the country’s best single markets as well. On Saturdays, 60-odd growers and procurers gather in the University Heights Community Center playground to sell their wares—which all come from within Washington State. Award-winning chefs like Maria Hines and Jerry Traunfeld (of Poppy) are often seen stocking up here on seafood like Alaskan spot prawns and tiny Pacific oysters; cuts of heavily marbled Mangalitsa pork; and foraged edible plants from the state’s deep, wet forests—including fiddlehead ferns, stinging nettles, and morels.

Most Unusual Find: Ozette potatoes—thin-skinned, lumpy fingerlings that were cultivated by Makah Pacific Coast Native Americans 200 years ago—from Full Circle Farm in nearby Carnation.

Courtesy of the Neighborhood Farmers Market Alliance [1] [1] http://www.seattlefarmersmarkets.org
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