Buenos Aires: Bodegones

10 of 32

The city’s past lives on in its bodegones,
neighborhood restaurants that often began as grocery stores. Here are the best
places to soak up Porteño spirit.

El Obrero This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La
Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford
Coppola on the wall. Dinner for two
$24.

El Preferido de Palermo Lost in a time warp amid Palermo’s trendy spots, this classic has retained its original grocery. Eat in the back
room with red-checked tablecloths where a mix of old-timers and barrio hipsters
order the signature fabada (Spanish bean-and-sausage casserole). Lunch for two $30.

Miramar Once a tailor shop, then a deli with a bar, this
ur-bodegón is famous for its collection of old vermouth bottles,
grilled sardines, and a wine-infused oxtail stew. Dinner for two $30.

Ña Serapia Cocina criolla—northern Argentinean
flavor—rules at this no-frills, dirt-cheap cult favorite across from the Parque
Las Heras. The carne picante (spicy beef) empanada is the juiciest in
town, and the carbonada stew teeming with pumpkin and corn spells
comfort food. Lunch for two $20. —Anya von
Bremzen

100 Best City Restaurants

Buenos Aires: Bodegones

The city’s past lives on in its bodegones,
neighborhood restaurants that often began as grocery stores. Here are the best
places to soak up Porteño spirit.

El Obrero This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La
Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford
Coppola on the wall. Dinner for two
$24.

El Preferido de Palermo Lost in a time warp amid Palermo’s trendy spots, this classic has retained its original grocery. Eat in the back
room with red-checked tablecloths where a mix of old-timers and barrio hipsters
order the signature fabada (Spanish bean-and-sausage casserole). Lunch for two $30.

Miramar Once a tailor shop, then a deli with a bar, this
ur-bodegón is famous for its collection of old vermouth bottles,
grilled sardines, and a wine-infused oxtail stew. Dinner for two $30.

Ña Serapia Cocina criolla—northern Argentinean
flavor—rules at this no-frills, dirt-cheap cult favorite across from the Parque
Las Heras. The carne picante (spicy beef) empanada is the juiciest in
town, and the carbonada stew teeming with pumpkin and corn spells
comfort food. Lunch for two $20. —Anya von
Bremzen

Andre Deak [1] [1] http://www.flickr.com/pontodeak

100 Best City Restaurants

Explore More