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10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Rick Urwin

Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, Vermont

What the APA Says: It’s a winner “not only for the historic buildings, thriving retail trade, and carefully maintained streets and walkways,” but also because of its “strong community support.”

Why They’re Right: While the advent of the indoor shopping mall in the 1970’s meant the death of most pedestrian malls, this one—established in 1981—still buzzes with activity. Burlington’s anti-establishment politics and its passionate embrace of cold weather contribute to the success of the four-block-long, brick-paved mall of Victorian, Art Deco, and modern buildings. Church Street Marketplace draws crowds year-round not only for the shops and restaurants, but also through cultural programming, street performers, festivals, art exhibits, concerts, and seasonal celebrations.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Pioneer Courthouse Square

Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland, Oregon

What the APA Says: It won for “its role as the city’s central downtown meeting place, its integration with transit, and the precedent it set for other revitalization projects in Portland.”

Why They’re Right: “Keep Portland Weird” read bumper stickers around town. Spend any time in Pioneer Courthouse Square and you’ll find that it’s ground zero for the alternative lifestyle embraced by the city. The square, known as “Portland’s Living Room,” hosts organized concerts, anti-war rallies, all-city sleepovers, art installations, local political speeches, an annual Tuba Christmas gathering of 200 tuba and euphonium players, as well as frequent impromptu performance art. The square’s current design, completed in 1984, features easy access from all surrounding streets, small welcoming areas of activity and leisure, as well as grander, more public spaces where locals come to be seen, as well as to watch the “weird” unfold.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Greg Peterson

Santa Monica Beach, Santa Monica, California

What the APA Says: “The designation stems from the beach’s commitment to accessibility, environmental stewardship and historic preservation, and maintaining its distinctive character.”

Why They’re Right: Perhaps the most unusual designee in this year’s 10 Best Public Spaces, this 3.5-mile stretch of public beach just west of Los Angeles draws millions of people annually to watch sunsets, stroll along the beachfront paths, sunbathe, people-watch, listen to musicians, surf, or ride the 1920’s carousel on Santa Monica Pier. Iconic images abound along the strand, which is recognized as the birthplace of beach culture: stilt-borne lifeguard stations, bikini-clad rollerbladers at Venice Beach, sun-bleached surfers at Malibu, body builders at Muscle Beach, leggy palm trees along Ocean Avenue, and those remarkable and unaffected sunsets over the Pacific.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Otavio Thompson

Union Station, Washington, D.C.

What the APA Says: It was named for its “vibrant social and welcoming atmosphere, its transportation options, its historic position in the L’Enfant Plan for Washington, and its sustained civic support and revitalization after periods of decline.”

Why They’re Right: In a city known for grand edifices and soaring public spaces, Washington’s Union Station holds its own. The terminal’s classical façade—three monumental arches with alternating columns and a pediment soaring 600 feet high—faces the Capitol building five blocks away, providing a dramatic entrance into the heart of the city. The scale of the main waiting room, with 96-foot-high vaulted and coffered ceilings, is somewhat softened by the noise and motion of the 20 million people who pass through annually. Not only is Union Station a transportation hub for Amtrak, Washington D.C.’s Metro and transit buses, and suburban train lines, but it’s also a destination for restaurants, music, and shopping, and its easy walking access from the surrounding neighborhoods ensure that it serves more than just train passengers.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Craig Kuhner

Waterfront Park, Charleston, South Carolina

What the APA Says: It won for its “welcoming design and public accessibility, unique design integrating the park’s two basic elements, land and water, and its role in the successful revitalization of downtown Charleston.”

Why They’re Right: Though a Great Lawn invites group activity, Waterfront Park was intended to remind Charleston of its place in the natural world—its proximity to the Copper River and the harbor, and the borderline between civilization and the wild. Pathways meander along the river; a grand avenue of trees passes smaller, more intimate garden spaces; walkways intersect with quiet piers jutting over the water; and then, as the path gets farther from the city streets, it runs alongside salt marshes. Wading birds, porpoises, and working boats dominate the view on the water, but a slight turn brings you back to Charleston’s charming architecture and bustle.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Mary & Peter Samouelian

Waterplace Park, Providence, Rhode Island

What the APA Says: It won because of “the careful planning; unprecedented, strong collaboration; and unwavering commitment to transform the ’world’s largest bridge’ into a network of attractive and inviting parks and walkways.”

Why They’re Right: When Providence moved its railroad tracks underground, the ugly and off-putting jumble of railroad bridges at the junction of the Moshassuck, Woonasquatucket, and Providence rivers became ripe for re-imagining. That process took 10 years and required the relocation of rivers, but the result—a peaceful stretch of water, river walks, plazas, and bridges—has become a focal point in the city’s arts renaissance. Theater and musical performances take place both on the water’s edge and, in the case of the annual Waterfire music festival, on torch-lit water beneath the walkways and bridges. The four-acre park has transformed a blighted and inaccessible area of downtown Providence into a thriving cultural, commercial, and residential community.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Donn R. Nottage

West Side Market, Cleveland, Ohio

What the APA Says: It won for “its functionality as a neighborhood gathering place and fresh food market; its engaging atmosphere; and its role as an anchor in the community, stimulating nearby commercial and residential activity.”

Why They’re Right: Cleveland shines brightly on the map of new American food destinations. The once-quiet city boasts star chefs, up-and-coming restaurants, and innovative cuisines informed by the cooking traditions of the Cleveland immigrants. Much of that local identity can be traced to the almost 100-year-old West Side Market, a market complex that includes brightly lit indoor food stalls as well as an outdoor annex of vegetable stalls. Decorative ceramic corbels depicting vegetables and animals sit atop columns that support a herringbone-brick vaulted ceiling and a distinctive clock tower. An anchor to a thriving downtown neighborhood, the West Side Market serves household shoppers, diners, as well as the kitchens of the surrounding ethnic restaurants.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Courtesy of Mike Bacon

Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza, Prescott, Arizona

What the APA Says: It “exemplifies how citizen support, planning and design, and grounds management and maintenance can create a treasured urban space that is the center—both geographically and spiritually—of the community.”

Why They’re Right: As a 1900 fire engulfed the saloons and brothels of Prescott (Arizona’s Whisky Row), patrons carried their bottles, glasses, and the monumental 24-foot-long oak bar out of the Palace Saloon and set it across the street in Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza to create a makeshift bar. That was not the first spirited event to take place in Courthouse Plaza’s history, nor was it the last. Prescott holds almost all community events—craft fairs, concerts, political speeches, art exhibits, antique shows, and seasonal celebrations—at Courthouse Plaza, just as it has since city planners mapped the square in 1864. The 4.1-acre square, with the 1916 granite courthouse at its center, anchors the town’s still-lively historic district of shops, cafes, bookstores, and art galleries.

10 Great American Public Spaces

<center>10 Great American Public Spaces</center>

Meghan Lamb

Central Park, New York City

What the APA Says: “An exemplary public space that successfully maintains a large naturalistic landscape in the midst of one of the densest cities in the country, Central Park is arguably the most emulated park in the country.”

Why They’re Right: At least once, everyone should stand in Central Park’s Sheep Meadow on a summer evening. That’s when the setting sun stretches shadows across the lush lawn and dapples the surrounding green trees, and distant music drifts up the sloping path from the carousel. And those rude and short-tempered New Yorkers?You’ll see them strolling the paths and greens, savoring the last light. Central Park, 843 acres of precious parkland in the heart of a space-challenged city, offers succor in forms both civilized and untamed: open fields, craggy outcroppings, playgrounds, ponds, performance spaces, skating rinks, gardens, and majestic tree-lined promenades.

10 Great American Public Spaces

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