Hemis / Alamy
Marie Asselin
November 13, 2014

The Québécois do indeed love their beer. The number of microbreweries in the province of Quebec could lead one to believe that microbreweries are a long-standing tradition; but in fact, the first microbrewery is said to have opened in the early 1980s, with the trend only picking up speed about 10 years later. And pick up speed it did. Now, they’re a phenomenon. The province counts over 120 microbreweries, which together produce over 3,300 different types beers! There are festivals dedicated to beer in the summer, and we work hard to get our locally-grown brews noticed on an international level. In fact, many breweries have won prestigious prizes in tasting contests held all over the world. In Quebec City, several microbreweries not only produce but also serve beer—including exclusive blends—plus they offer delicious homemade food on their premises, becoming some of the coolest spots to grab a casual lunch or dinner. 

La Korrigane

La Korrigane is a brewery that produces its beers in very small quantities and serves them exclusively in its lively pub. In addition to traditional blends, the brewery also uses ingredients such as fresh blueberries and maple sap to produce intriguingly complex beers. The food is creative and uses locally-grown and produced ingredients. 

La Barberie

Off the beaten path on an outlying street of Saint-Roch, La Barberie is a laid-back spot visited by a diverse crowd, including hipsters, bar flies, and even families. Sample all of the tap selection by ordering the “carousel,” a wooden stand that holds eight glasses or pints. No food is served, but you can bring your own snacks, or use the communal barbecue in the summer.

 

L'Inox Maîtres Brasseurs

L’Inox, which opened over 25 years ago, is one of the city’s oldest microbreweries. Located on touristy Grande-Allée, it manages to keep a casual atmosphere, and locals are faithful to their classic lineup of beer blends. The terrace is the perfect place to people watch, especially when the street becomes a pedestrian-only thoroughfare during festivals.

 

La Souche

This brewery makes its own blends—its beer lineup features 20+ varieties—but true to its mission of encouraging Quebec’s industry, it also serves beers from other microbreweries. The pub is rustic and cozy, and the surprisingly elaborate menu features classic pub fare like burgers, poutines, and snacks, but everything is made fresh using the best local ingredients.

 

Corsaire Microbrasserie

A short and beautiful ferry ride away from Quebec City’s Old Port, Corsaire Microbrasserie blends 12 different beers, some of which are also sold in specialty shops around the city. The place is also known for its impressive selection of 60 single malts and 9 coffee blends, all roasted on site.

 

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