Jedd Johnson
Geraldine Mishev
December 26, 2014

Jackson doesn’t have what you’d expect for international cuisine. Half of the valley’s population has probably traveled to India, but we only got our first year-round Indian restaurant in spring 2014. Even so, you could eat at a different sushi restaurant every night and not repeat for almost a week. (And most of those meals would be standout, especially Nikai and Sudachi.) Thai is somewhere in between. Of course we’ve got Chinese restaurants, although none that are remarkable beyond the fact that they’re among the longest-lived restaurants in the valley, despite always seeming to be empty. Pearl Street Market and Aspens Market import cheeses and salumis from around the world, while Osteria makes much of its Italian-influenced charcuterie in house. Persephone Café bakes and serves French-inspired breads and pastries (head baker and co-owner Kevin Cohane trained at Cordon Bleu in Paris). Oh, and thirty-percent of the valley’s population is native to Mexico. Here are my five favorite spots for global cuisine:  

Teton Thai

Teton Thai wasn’t the valley’s first Thai restaurant, but most everyone agrees it’s the best, albeit not the most affordable. (Expect your pad Thai to be about $5 more than you’re used to.) Eaten in Teton Thai’s intimate, contemporary space in Teton Village, though, you won’t mind.

Thai Plate

Wall calendars dating from 2010? Tapestries of elephants exuberantly outfitted in sequins? Chipped walls painted in pastel colors? Jackson Hole locals love Thai Plate, hidden at the end of a wood sidewalk off Cache St., for its unabashedly low-key atmosphere, as well as its heaping portions of authentic Thai food. 

The Indian

Whether you snag a table in the restaurant, or want to go less formal and eat at the bar, the butter chicken, inventive cocktails and mussels are standouts at this newish Indian spot one block from the Town Square. If you can’t get past the decidedly non-politically-correct Colonial décor, they do take out.

King Sushi

For a town its size, Jackson has a surprising number of sushi restaurants—and most seek to be transportive, making you feel like you’ve left Jackson behind when you walk in the door. Case in point: King Sushi is in a log cabin. The cabin is historic, but the sushi is among the most inventive and daring in town.

Sanchez

Locals generally agree on the best Mexican place in the valley: the affordable, walk-up and family-owned Sanchez, located between the Town Square and Snow King. Up for debate is which is better: their tacos—non-greasy and overflowing, especially the veggie ones—or their fabulous huevos rancheros

You May Like