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Atlas Obscura mapped the surviving UFO homes around the planet.

Melanie Lieberman
September 24, 2016

Before there were rolling, prairie-inspired vacation homes or teeny, tiny house-hotels, there was the “Futuro House.”

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a peculiar trend took off with some homeowners. A compact house designed by Matti Suuronen that looked like a UFO gained traction.

These portable, prefabricated, and plastic structures had all the trappings of a Hollywood prop: a hatch for a front door, an ellipsoid shape perfect for blazing across the cosmos, and groovy lounge chairs around a central fire pit.

In total, 96 of these flying saucer-shaped homes were built. The approximately 60 that remain are a testament to the Space Age frenzy. Atlas Obscura mapped the surviving Futuros, which can be found in different spots across the planet (Earth).

There’s the graffiti-covered Royse City, Texas, Futuro, and a gleaming white Futuro on a beach in Adelaide, Australia. Enthusiasts can visit Suuronen’s original prototype in a museum in Rotterdam, or even spend the night in one of the pod-like homes.

There’s a Futuro on the shores of a Woodruff, Wisconsin, lake, available as a vacation rental on FlipKey, and even one perched in Russia’s Caucasus Mountains. The latter serves as a lounge for guests staying at Hotel Tarelka, and is perhaps one of the only Futuro Houses serving its intended purpose as a transportable ski cabin.

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